OREMUS: 19 March 2008

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Tue Mar 18 17:00:28 GMT 2008


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OREMUS for Wednesday, March 19, 2008
Wednesday in Holy Week

O God, make speed to save us;
O Lord, make haste to help us.

Blessed are you, almighty God,
through your Son, Jesus Christ our Lord,
for the days in which we commemorate
his life-giving death and glorious resurrection
are close at hand,
when the pride of the ancient enemy is trampled down
and the mystery of our redemption is fulfilled.
For these and all your mercies, we praise you,
Father, Son and Holy Spirit:
Blessed be God for ever!

An opening canticle may be sung. 

http://www.oremus.org/passocan.html

Psalm 142

I cry to the Lord with my voice;*
 to the Lord I make loud supplication.
I pour out my complaint before him*
 and tell him all my trouble.
When my spirit languishes within me, you know my path;*
 in the way wherein I walk they have hidden a trap for me.
I look to my right hand and find no one who knows me;*
 I have no place to flee to and no one cares for me.
I cry out to you, O Lord;*
 I say, 'You are my refuge,
   my portion in the land of the living.'
Listen to my cry for help,
   for I have been brought very low;*
 save me from those who pursue me,
   for they are too strong for me.
Bring me out of prison,
   that I may give thanks to your name;*
 when you have dealt bountifully with me,
   the righteous will gather around me.

READING [Wisdom 1:16-2:1, 12-22]:

But the ungodly by their words and deeds summoned death;
considering him a friend, they pined away
and made a covenant with him,
because they are fit to belong to his company.

For they reasoned unsoundly, saying to themselves,
'Short and sorrowful is our life,
and there is no remedy when a life comes to its end,
and no one has been known to return from Hades.
'Let us lie in wait for the righteous man,
because he is inconvenient to us and opposes our actions;
he reproaches us for sins against the law,
and accuses us of sins against our training.
He professes to have knowledge of God,
and calls himself a child of the Lord.
He became to us a reproof of our thoughts;
the very sight of him is a burden to us,
because his manner of life is unlike that of others,
and his ways are strange.
We are considered by him as something base,
and he avoids our ways as unclean;
he calls the last end of the righteous happy,
and boasts that God is his father.
Let us see if his words are true,
and let us test what will happen at the end of his life;
for if the righteous man is God's child, he will help him,
and will deliver him from the hand of his adversaries.
Let us test him with insult and torture,
so that we may find out how gentle he is,
and make trial of his forbearance.
Let us condemn him to a shameful death,
for, according to what he says, he will be protected.'

Thus they reasoned, but they were led astray,
for their wickedness blinded them,
and they did not know the secret purposes of God,
nor hoped for the wages of holiness,
nor discerned the prize for blameless souls

HYMN 
Words: Thomas Kelly, 1815
Tune: Bow Brickhill, Breslau, Ach bleib bei uns
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We sing the praise of him who died,
of him who died upon the cross;
the sinner's hope let men deride;
for this we count the world but loss.

Inscribed upon the cross we see
in shining letters, God is love:
he bears our sins upon the tree:
he brings us mercy from above.

The cross: it takes our guilt away,
it holds the fainting spirit up;
it cheers with hope the gloomy day,
and sweetens every bitter cup.

It makes the coward spirit brave,
and nerves the feeble arm for fight;
it takes its terror from the grave,
and gilds the bed of death with light.

The balm of life, the cure of woe,
the measure and the pledge of love,
the sinner's refuge here below,
the angel's theme in heaven above.

SECOND READING [Luke 22:54-71]:

Then they seized him and led Jesus away, bringing him into the high priest's house. But Peter was
following at a distance. When they had kindled a fire in the middle of the courtyard and sat down
together, Peter sat among them. Then a servant-girl, seeing him in the firelight, stared at him and
said, 'This man also was with him.' But he denied it, saying, 'Woman, I do not know him.' A little
later someone else, on seeing him, said, 'You also are one of them.' But Peter said, 'Man, I am
not!' Then about an hour later yet another kept insisting, 'Surely this man also was with him; for
he is a Galilean.' But Peter said, 'Man, I do not know what you are talking about!' At that
moment, while he was still speaking, the cock crowed. The Lord turned and looked at Peter. Then
Peter remembered the word of the Lord, how he had said to him, 'Before the cock crows today,
you will deny me three times.' And he went out and wept bitterly.
Now the men who were holding Jesus began to mock him and beat him; they also blindfolded him
and kept asking him, 'Prophesy! Who is it that struck you?' They kept heaping many other insults
on him.
When day came, the assembly of the elders of the people, both chief priests and scribes, gathered
together, and they brought him to their council. They said, 'If you are the Messiah, tell us.' He
replied, 'If I tell you, you will not believe; and if I question you, you will not answer. But from
now on the Son of Man will be seated at the right hand of the power of God.' All of them asked,
'Are you, then, the Son of God?' He said to them, 'You say that I am.' Then they said, 'What
further testimony do we need? We have heard it ourselves from his own lips!' 
The Benedictus (Morning),
the 
Magnificat (Evening), or 
Nunc dimittis (Night) may
follow.

Prayer:
With faith and love and in union with Christ,
let us offer our prayer before the throne of grace.

Have mercy on your people,
for whom your Son laid down his life.
Lord, graciously hear us.

Bring healing and wholeness to people and nations,
and have pity on those torn apart by division. 
Lord, graciously hear us.

Strengthen all who are persecuted for your name's sake,
and deliver them from evil.
Lord, graciously hear us.

Look in mercy upon all who suffer,
and hear those who cry out in pain and desolation.
Lord, graciously hear us.

Bring comfort to the dying,
and gladden their hearts with the power of your glory.
Lord, graciously hear us.

Give rest to the departed and bring them, with your saints,
to glory everlasting.
Lord, graciously hear us.

As we rejoice in the triumph of the cross,
we pray that the whole of creation may find fulfillment
in the eternal kingdom of God:

Almighty God,
as we stand at the foot of the cross of your Son,
help us to see and know your love for us,
so that in humility, love and joy
we may place at his feet
all that we have and all that we are;
through Jesus Christ our Savior. Amen.

Standing at the foot of the cross,
we pray as our Savior has taught us:

- The Lord's Prayer

Lead us, O God, in the way of Christ
and give us courage to take up our cross
and, in full reliance upon your grace, to follow him. Amen.

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The psalms are from _Celebrating Common Prayer_ (Mowbray),
(c) The Society of Saint Francis 1992, which is used with permission.

The canticle and the invitation to the Lord's Prayer (adapted) are from
_Common Worship: Daily Prayer, Preliminary Edition_, copyright
(c) The Archbishops' Council, 2002.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The opening prayer of thanksgiving is adapted by Stephen Benner from
_We Give You Thanks and Praise: The Ambrosian Eucharistic
Prefaces_, translated by Alan Griffiths, (c) The Canterbury Press
Norwich, 1999.

The closing sentence is adapted from two sentences in a prayer from
_Book of Common Worship_, (c) 1993 Westminster / John
Knox Press.



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