OREMUS: 15 March 2008

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Fri Mar 14 17:00:07 GMT 2008


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OREMUS for Saturday, March 15, 2008

O God, make speed to save us;
O Lord, make haste to help us.

Blessed are you, holy Father, 
almighty and eternal God,
 through Jesus Christ our Lord.
For as the time of his passion and resurrection draws near
the whole world is called to acknowledge his hidden majesty.
The power of the life-giving cross
reveals the judgement that has come upon the world
and the triumph of Christ crucified.
He is the victim who dies no more,
the Lamb once slain, who lives for ever,
our advocate in heaven to plead our cause.
For these and all your mercies, we praise you:
Father, Son, and Holy Spirit,
Blessed be God for ever!

An opening canticle may be sung. 

http://www.oremus.org/lentocan.html

Psalm 79

O God, the heathen have come into your inheritance;
   they have profaned your holy temple;*
 they have made Jerusalem a heap of rubble.
They have given the bodies of your servants
   as food for the birds of the air,*
 and the flesh of your faithful ones
   to the beasts of the field.
They have shed their blood like water
   on every side of Jerusalem,*
 and there was no one to bury them.
We have become a reproach to our neighbours,*
 an object of scorn and derision to those around us.
How long will you be angry, O Lord?*
 will your fury blaze like fire for ever?
Pour out your wrath upon the heathen
   who have not known you*
 and upon the kingdoms
   that have not called upon your name.
For they have devoured Jacob*
 and made his dwelling a ruin.
Remember not our past sins;
   let your compassion be swift to meet us;*
 for we have been brought very low.
Help us, O God our Saviour, for the glory of your name;*
 deliver us and forgive us our sins, for your name's sake.<!-- v10
     [
Why should the heathen say, 'Where is their God?'*
 Let it be known among the heathen and in our sight
   that you avenge the shedding
   of your servants' blood.]
Let the sorrowful sighing of the prisoners
   come before you,*
 and by your great might
   spare those who are condemned to die.<!-- v12
     [
May the revilings with which
   they reviled you, O Lord,*
 return sevenfold into their bosoms.]
We are your people and the sheep of your pasture;*
 we will give you thanks for ever
   and show forth your praise from age to age.

Psalm 110:1-5

The Lord said to my lord, 'Sit at my right hand,*
 until I make your enemies your footstool.'
The Lord will send the sceptre of your power
   out of Zion,*
 saying, 'Rule over your enemies round about you.
'Princely state has been yours
   from the day of your birth,*
 in the beauty of holiness have I begotten you,
   like dew from the womb of the morning.'
The Lord has sworn and he will not recant:*
 'You are a priest for ever after the order of Melchizedek.'

The Prayer of Habakkuk (Habakkuk 3.2-4,13a,15-19)

O Lord, I have heard of your renown,  
and I stand in awe, O Lord, of your work. 
In the midst of the years renew it; 
in the midst of the years make it known;  
in wrath remember mercy. 
God came from Teman, and the Holy One from Mount Paran.  
His glory covered the heavens, and the earth was full of his praise. 
His brightness was like the sun,  
rays flashed from his hand; there he veiled his power. 
You came forth to save your people,  
to save your anointed. 
You trampled the sea with your horses,  
churning the mighty waters. 
I hear, and my belly trembles,  
my lips quiver at the sound; 
Rottenness enters into my bones,  
and my steps totter beneath me. 
I will quietly wait for the day of trouble  
to come upon the people that invade us. 
Though the fig tree does not blossom, 
nor fruit appear on the vines,  
the produce of the olive fail, and the fields yield no food, 
Though the flock be cut off from the fold  
and there be no herd in the stalls, 
Yet will I rejoice in the Lord,  
I will exult in the God of my salvation. 
God, the Lord, is my strength;  
he makes my feet like hinds' feet, 
and makes me tread upon the high places. 

FIRST READING [Ezekiel 37.21 end]:

Thus says the Lord God: I will take the people of Israel from the nations among which
they have gone, and will gather them from every quarter, and bring them to their own
land. I will make them one nation in the land, on the mountains of Israel; and one king
shall be king over them all. Never again shall they be two nations, and never again
shall they be divided into two kingdoms. They shall never again defile themselves with
their idols and their detestable things, or with any of their transgressions. I will save
them from all the apostasies into which they have fallen, and will cleanse them. Then
they shall be my people, and I will be their God.
My servant David shall be king over them; and they shall all have one shepherd. They
shall follow my ordinances and be careful to observe my statutes. They shall live in the
land that I gave to my servant Jacob, in which your ancestors lived; they and their
children and their children's children shall live there for ever; and my servant David
shall be their prince for ever. I will make a covenant of peace with them; it shall be an
everlasting covenant with them; and I will bless them and multiply them, and will set
my sanctuary among them for evermore. My dwelling-place shall be with them; and I
will be their God, and they shall be my people. Then the nations shall know that I the
Lord sanctify Israel, when my sanctuary is among them for evermore. 

HYMN 
Words: James Russell Lowell, 1849
Tune: Ton-y-Botel (Ebenezer)

http://www.oremus.org/hymnal/o/o786.html
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Once to every man and nation,
comes the moment to decide,
in the strife of truth with falsehood,
for the good or evil side;
some great cause, some great decision,
offering each the bloom or blight,
and the choice goes by forever,
'twixt that darkness and that light.

Then to side with truth is noble,
when we share her wretched crust,
ere her cause bring fame and profit,
and 'tis prosperous to be just;
then it is the brave man chooses
while the coward stands aside,
till the multitude make virtue
of the faith they had denied.

By the light of burning martyrs,
Christ, thy bleeding feet we track,
toiling up new Calvaries ever
with the cross that turns not back;
new occasions teach new duties,
ancient values test our youth;
they must upward still and onward,
who would keep abreast of truth.

Though the cause of evil prosper,
yet the truth alone is strong;
though her portion be the scaffold,
and upon the throne be wrong;
yet that scaffold sways the future,
and behind the dim unknown,
standeth God within the shadow,
keeping watch above his own.

SECOND READING [John 11.45 end]:

Many of the Jews therefore, who had come with Mary and had seen what Jesus did,
believed in him. But some of them went to the Pharisees and told them what he had
done. So the chief priests and the Pharisees called a meeting of the council, and said,
'What are we to do? This man is performing many signs. If we let him go on like this,
everyone will believe in him, and the Romans will come and destroy both our holy
place and our nation.' But one of them, Caiaphas, who was high priest that year, said
to them, 'You know nothing at all! You do not understand that it is better for you to
have one man die for the people than to have the whole nation destroyed.' He did not
say this on his own, but being high priest that year he prophesied that Jesus was about
to die for the nation, and not for the nation only, but to gather into one the dispersed
children of God. So from that day on they planned to put him to death.
Jesus therefore no longer walked about openly among the Jews, but went from there
to a town called Ephraim in the region near the wilderness; and he remained there with
the disciples.
Now the Passover of the Jews was near, and many went up from the country to
Jerusalem before the Passover to purify themselves. They were looking for Jesus and
were asking one another as they stood in the temple, 'What do you think? Surely he
will not come to the festival, will he?' Now the chief priests and the Pharisees had
given orders that anyone who knew where Jesus was should let them know, so that
they might arrest him. 

The Benedictus (Morning), 
the Magnificat (Evening), or 
Nunc dimittis (Night) may follow.

Prayer:
Jesus, remember us when you come into your kingdom
and hear our prayers.

For your Church around the world,
we ask new life.

For all who carry out ministries in your Church,
we ask grace and wisdom.

For people who have accepted spiritual disciplines,
we ask inspired discipleship.

For Christians of every land,
we ask new unity in your Name.

For Jews and Muslims and people of other faiths,
we ask your divine blessing.

For those who cannot believe,
we ask your faithful love.

For governors and rulers in every land,
we ask your guidance.

For people who suffer and sorrow,
we ask your healing peace.

When you came among us in majesty, O God,
you took the form of a servant.
May we whom you call to your priestly service
work to establish justice on earth,
that we may inherit your kingdom in heaven;
through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.
       
Trusting in the compassion of God,
let us pray as our Savior taught us:

- The Lord's Prayer

Christ crucified draw us to himself,
to find in him a sure ground for faith,
a firm support for hope,
and the assurance of sins forgiven. Amen.

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The psalms and the invitation to the Lord's Prayer are from _Celebrating Common
Prayer_ (Mowbray), (c) The Society of Saint Francis 1992, which is used with
permission.

The canticle is from _Common Worship: Daily Prayer, Preliminary
Edition_, copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2002.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The opening prayer of thanksgiving adapts phrases from _Opening
Prayers: Collects in Contemporary Language_. Canterbury Press,
Norwich, 1999.

The closing sentence is from _New Patterns for Worship_,
copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2002.



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