OREMUS: 4 March 2008

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Mon Mar 3 17:00:01 GMT 2008


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OREMUS for Tuesday, March 4, 2008

O God, make speed to save us;
O Lord, make haste to help us.

Glory to you, O Champion of all Loves,
who for our sake endured the cross,
encountered the enemy and tasted death.
Glory be to you, O King of all kings,
who for our salvation
wrestled with principalities and powers,
subdued the forces of hell
and won the greatest of all victories.
To you be all praise, all glory and all love;
now and for ever. Amen.

An opening canticle may be sung. 

http://www.oremus.org/lentocan.html

Psalm 130

Out of the depths have I called to you, O Lord;
   Lord, hear my voice;*
 let your ears consider well the voice of my supplication.
If you, Lord, were to note what is done amiss,*
 O Lord, who could stand?
For there is forgiveness with you;*
 therefore you shall be feared.
I wait for the Lord; my soul waits for him;*
 in his word is my hope.
My soul waits for the Lord,
   more than the night-watch for the morning,*
 more than the night-watch for the morning.
O Israel, wait for the Lord,*
 for with the Lord there is mercy;
With him there is plenteous redemption,*
 and he shall redeem Israel from all their sins.

Psalm 131

O Lord, I am not proud;*
 I have no haughty looks.
I do not occupy myself with great matters,*
 or with things that are too hard for me.
But I still my soul and make it quiet,
   like a child upon its mother's breast;*
 my soul is quieted within me.
O Israel, wait upon the Lord,*
 from this time forth for evermore.

Psalm 137:1-6

By the waters of Babylon we sat down and wept,*
 when we remembered you, O Zion.
As for our harps, we hung them up*
 on the trees in the midst of that land.
For those who led us away captive asked us for a song,
   and our oppressors called for mirth:*
 'Sing us one of the songs of Zion.'
How shall we sing the Lord's song*
 upon an alien soil?
If I forget you, O Jerusalem,*
 let my right hand forget its skill.
Let my tongue cleave to the roof of my mouth
   if I do not remember you,*
 if I do not set Jerusalem above my highest joy.

A Song of the Word of the Lord (Isaiah 55.6-11)

Seek the Lord while he may be found,  
call upon him while he is near; 
Let the wicked abandon their ways,  
and the unrighteous their thoughts; 
Return to the Lord, who will have mercy;  
to our God, who will richly pardon. 
'For my thoughts are not your thoughts,  
neither are your ways my ways,' says the Lord. 
'For as the heavens are higher than the earth,  
so are my ways higher than your ways 
and my thoughts than your thoughts. 
'As the rain and the snow come down from above,  
and return not again but water the earth, 
'Bringing forth life and giving growth,  
seed for sowing and bread to eat, 
'So is my word that goes forth from my mouth;  
it will not return to me fruitless, 
'But it will accomplish that which I purpose,  
and succeed in the task I gave it.'

Psalm 146

Praise the Lord, O my soul!*
 I will praise the Lord as long as I live;
   I will sing praises to my God while I have my being.
Put not your trust in rulers,
   nor in any child of earth,*
 for there is no help in them.
When they breathe their last, they return to earth,*
 and in that day their thoughts perish.
Happy are they who have the God of Jacob
   for their help!*
 whose hope is in the Lord their God;
Who made heaven and earth, the seas,
   and all that is in them;*
 who keeps his promise for ever;
Who gives justice to those who are oppressed,*
 and food to those who hunger.
The Lord sets the prisoners free;
   the Lord opens the eyes of the blind;*
 the Lord lifts up those who are bowed down;
The Lord loves the righteous;
   the Lord cares for the stranger;*
 he sustains the orphan and widow,
   but frustrates the way of the wicked.
The Lord shall reign for ever,*
 your God, O Zion, throughout all generations.

FIRST READING [Ezekiel 47.1 9, 12]:

Then he brought me back to the entrance of the temple; there, water was flowing from
below the threshold of the temple towards the east (for the temple faced east); and the
water was flowing down from below the south end of the threshold of the temple,
south of the altar. Then he brought me out by way of the north gate, and led me round
on the outside to the outer gate that faces towards the east; and the water was coming
out on the south side.
Going on eastwards with a cord in his hand, the man measured one thousand cubits,
and then led me through the water; and it was ankle-deep. Again he measured one
thousand, and led me through the water; and it was knee-deep. Again he measured one
thousand, and led me through the water; and it was up to the waist. Again he
measured one thousand, and it was a river that I could not cross, for the water had
risen; it was deep enough to swim in, a river that could not be crossed. He said to me,
'Mortal, have you seen this?'

Then he led me back along the bank of the river. As I came back, I saw on the bank of
the river a great many trees on one side and on the other. He said to me, 'This water
flows towards the eastern region and goes down into the Arabah; and when it enters
the sea, the sea of stagnant waters, the water will become fresh. Wherever the river
goes, every living creature that swarms will live, and there will be very many fish, once
these waters reach there. It will become fresh; and everything will live where the river
goes. On the banks, on both sides of the river, there will grow all kinds of trees for
food. Their leaves will not wither nor their fruit fail, but they will bear fresh fruit every
month, because the water for them flows from the sanctuary. Their fruit will be for
food, and their leaves for healing.' 

HYMN 
Words: George William Kitchen and Michael Robert Newbolt, 1916
Tune: Crucifer

http://www.oremus.org/hymnal/l/l118.html
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Refrain:
Lift high the cross,
the love of Christ proclaim
till all the world adore
his sacred Name.

Come, brethren, follow where our Captain trod,
our King victorious, Christ the Son of God. Refrain

Led on their way by this triumphant sign,
the hosts of God in conquering ranks combine. Refrain

Each newborn soldier of the Crucified
bears on the brow the seal of him who died. Refrain

This is the sign which Satan's legions fear
and angels veil their faces to rever. Refrain

Saved by this Cross whereon their Lord was slain,
the sons of Adam their lost home regain. Refrain

>From north and south, from east and west they raise
in growing unison their songs of praise. Refrain

O Lord, once lifted on the glorious tree,
as thou hast promised, draw the world to thee. Refrain

Let every race and every language tell
of him who saves our souls from death and hell. Refrain

>From farthest regions let their homage bring,
and on his Cross adore their Savior King. Refrain

Set up thy throne, that earth's despair may cease
beneath the shadow of its healing peace. Refrain

For thy blest Cross which doth for all atone
creation's praises rise before thy throne. Refrain 

SECOND READING [John 5.1 3, 5 16]:

After this there was a festival of the Jews, and Jesus went up to Jerusalem.
Now in Jerusalem by the Sheep Gate there is a pool, called in Hebrew Beth-zatha,
which has five porticoes. In these lay many invalids blind, lame, and paralysed. One
man was there who had been ill for thirty-eight years. When Jesus saw him lying there
and knew that he had been there a long time, he said to him, 'Do you want to be made
well?' The sick man answered him, 'Sir, I have no one to put me into the pool when
the water is stirred up; and while I am making my way, someone else steps down
ahead of me.' Jesus said to him, 'Stand up, take your mat and walk.' At once the man
was made well, and he took up his mat and began to walk.
Now that day was a sabbath. So the Jews said to the man who had been cured, 'It is
the sabbath; it is not lawful for you to carry your mat.' But he answered them, 'The
man who made me well said to me, "Take up your mat and walk." ' They asked him,
'Who is the man who said to you, "Take it up and walk"?' Now the man who had
been healed did not know who it was, for Jesus had disappeared in the crowd that was
there. Later Jesus found him in the temple and said to him, 'See, you have been made
well! Do not sin any more, so that nothing worse happens to you.' The man went
away and told the Jews that it was Jesus who had made him well. Therefore the Jews
started persecuting Jesus, because he was doing such things on the sabbath. 

The Benedictus (Morning), 
the Magnificat (Evening), or 
Nunc dimittis (Night) may follow.

Prayer:
Show us your mercy, O Lord;
And grant us your salvation.

O Lord, save our nation;
And teach wisdom to those in authority.

Let your priests be clothed with righteousness;
Let your faithful people sing with joy.

Let your ways be known upon earth;
Your saving health among all nations.

Give your people the blessing of peace
And may all the earth be filled with your glory.

Create in us clean hearts, O God,
And renew a right spirit within us.

Lord of mercy and redemption,
rescue us, we pray, from the depths of sin and death;
forgive us what we do wrong,
and give us grace to stand in your presence,
to serve you in Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.
       
Trusting in the compassion of God,
let us pray as our Savior taught us:

- The Lord's Prayer

Help us, O Lord Jesus Christ,
to enter in your sorrows and to rejoice in your victory;
to embrace your cross and to wear your crown;
to receive the wounds of your love
and to behold you in glory and light;
for your own name's sake. Amen.

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The psalms and the invitation to the Lord's Prayer are from _Celebrating Common
Prayer_ (Mowbray), (c) The Society of Saint Francis 1992, which is used with
permission.

The canticle is from _Common Worship: Daily Prayer, Preliminary
Edition_, copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2002.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The opening prayer of thanksgiving is by Thomas Ken (1637-1711) and the closing prayer
is by St. Bridget of Sweden (1303-1373).



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