OREMUS: 3 March 2008

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Sun Mar 2 20:16:48 GMT 2008


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OREMUS for Monday, March 3, 2008
John and Charles Wesley, Evangelists, Hymn Writers, 1791 and 1788

O God, make speed to save us;
O Lord, make haste to help us.

Glory to you, O Champion of all Loves,
who for our sake endured the cross,
encountered the enemy and tasted death.
Glory be to you, O King of all kings,
who for our salvation
wrestled with principalities and powers,
subdued the forces of hell
and won the greatest of all victories.
To you be all praise, all glory and all love;
now and for ever. Amen.

An opening canticle may be sung. 

http://www.oremus.org/lentocan.html

Psalm 103

Bless the Lord, O my soul,*
 and all that is within me, bless his holy name.
Bless the Lord, O my soul,*
 and forget not all his benefits.
He forgives all your sins*
 and heals all your infirmities;
He redeems your life from the grave*
 and crowns you with mercy and loving-kindness;
He satisfies you with good things,*
 and your youth is renewed like an eagle's.
The Lord executes righteousness*
 and judgement for all who are oppressed.
He made his ways known to Moses*
 and his works to the children of Israel.
The Lord is full of compassion and mercy,*
 slow to anger and of great kindness.
He will not always accuse us,*
 nor will he keep his anger for ever.
He has not dealt with us according to our sins,*
 nor rewarded us according to our wickedness.
For as the heavens are high above the earth,*
 so is his mercy great upon those who fear him.
As far as the east is from the west,*
 so far has he removed our sins from us.
As a father cares for his children,*
 so does the Lord care for those who fear him.
For he himself knows whereof we are made;*
 he remembers that we are but dust.
Our days are like the grass;*
 we flourish like a flower of the field;
When the wind goes over it, it is gone,*
 and its place shall know it no more.
But the merciful goodness of the Lord
   endures for ever on those who fear him,*
 and his righteousness on children's children;
On those who keep his covenant*
 and remember his commandments and do them.
The Lord has set his throne in heaven,*
 and his kingship has dominion over all.
Bless the Lord, you angels of his,
   you mighty ones who do his bidding,*
 and hearken to the voice of his word.
Bless the Lord, all you his hosts,*
 you ministers of his who do his will.
Bless the Lord, all you works of his,
   in all places of his dominion;*
 bless the Lord, O my soul.

Psalm 123

To you I lift up my eyes,*
 to you enthroned in the heavens.
As the eyes of servants look to the hand of their masters,*
 and the eyes of a maid to the hand of her mistress,
So our eyes look to the Lord our God,*
 until he show us his mercy.
Have mercy upon us, O Lord, have mercy,*
 for we have had more than enough of contempt,
Too much of the scorn of the indolent rich,*
 and of the derision of the proud.

A Song of Praise (Revelation 4.11; 5.9b,10)

You are worthy, our Lord and God,  
to receive glory and honour and power. 
For you have created all things,  
and by your will they have their being. 
You are worthy, O Lamb, for you were slain,  
and by your blood you ransomed for God 
saints from every tribe and language and nation. 
You have made them to be a kingdom and priests 
serving our God,  
and they will reign with you on earth.

Psalm 150

Praise God in his holy temple;*
 praise him in the firmament of his power.
Praise him for his mighty acts;*
 praise him for his excellent greatness.
Praise him with the blast of the ram's-horn;*
 praise him with lyre and harp.
Praise him with timbrel and dance;*
 praise him with strings and pipe.
Praise him with resounding cymbals;*
 praise him with loud-clanging cymbals.
Let everything that has breath*
 praise the Lord.

FIRST READING [Isaiah 65.17 21]:

Thus says the LORD:
Lo, I am about to create new heavens
and a new earth;
The things of the past shall not be remembered
or come to mind.
Instead, there shall always be rejoicing and happiness
in what I create;
For I create Jerusalem to be a joy
and its people to be a delight;
I will rejoice in Jerusalem
and exult in my people.
No longer shall the sound of weeping be heard there,
or the sound of crying;
No longer shall there be in it
an infant who lives but a few days,
or an old man who does not round out his full lifetime;
He dies a mere youth who reaches but a hundred years,
and he who fails of a hundred shall be thought accursed.
They shall live in the houses they build,
and eat the fruit of the vineyards they plant.

HYMN 
Words: John and Charles Wesley, 1745
Tune: Das neugeborne Kindelein

http://www.oremus.org/hymnal/o/o624.htmlHit "Back" in your browser to
return to Oremus.

O thou, before the world began,
ordained a sacrifice for man,
and by the eternal Spirit made
an offering in the sinner's stead;
our everlasting Priest art thou,
pleading thy death for sinners now.

Thy offering still continues new
before the righteous Father's view;
thyself the Lamb forever slain;
thy priesthood doth unchanged remain;
thy years, O God, can never fail,
nor thy blest work within the veil.

O that our faith may never move,
but stand unshaken as thy love,
sure evidence of things unseen;
now let it pass the years between
and view thee bleeding on the tree:
my Lord, my God, who dies for me.

SECOND READING [John 4.43 end]:

At that time Jesus left Samaria for Galilee.
For Jesus himself testified
that a prophet has no honor in his native place.
When he came into Galilee, the Galileans welcomed him,
since they had seen all he had done in Jerusalem at the feast;
for they themselves had gone to the feast.

Then he returned to Cana in Galilee,
where he had made the water wine.
Now there was a royal official whose son was ill in Capernaum.
When he heard that Jesus had arrived in Galilee from Judea,
he went to him and asked him to come down
and heal his son, who was near death.
Jesus said to him,
"Unless you people see signs and wonders, you will not believe."
The royal official said to him,
"Sir, come down before my child dies."
Jesus said to him, "You may go; your son will live."
The man believed what Jesus said to him and left.
While the man was on his way back,
his slaves met him and told him that his boy would live.
He asked them when he began to recover.
They told him,
"The fever left him yesterday, about one in the afternoon."
The father realized that just at that time Jesus had said to him,
"Your son will live,"
and he and his whole household came to believe.
Now this was the second sign Jesus did
when he came to Galilee from Judea.

The Benedictus (Morning), 
the Magnificat (Evening), or 
Nunc dimittis (Night) may follow.

Prayer:
Save your people, Lord, and bless your inheritance,
Govern and uphold them now and always.

Day by day, we bless you;
We praise your name for ever.

Keep us today, Lord, from all sin;
Have mercy on us, Lord, have mercy.

We long for your salvation, O Lord:
grant us understanding, that we may live.

Lord, show us your love and mercy,
For we put our trust in you.

In you, Lord, is our hope:
Let us not be confounded at the last

As your merciful goodness endures for ever, O Lord,
remember the frailty of your children;
deal with us not according to our sins
but, in your compassion, redeem our life
and crown us with your mercy and loving-kindness;
through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Lord God, 
you inspired your servants John and Charles Wesley 
with burning zeal for the sanctification of souls, 
and endowed them with eloquence in speech and song: 
Kindle in your Church, we entreat you, such fervor, 
that those whose faith has cooled may be warmed, 
and those who have not known Christ 
may turn to him and be saved;
through him who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and for ever. Amen.
       
Trusting in the compassion of God,
let us pray as our Savior taught us:

- The Lord's Prayer

Help us, O Lord Jesus Christ,
to enter in your sorrows and to rejoice in your victory;
to embrace your cross and to wear your crown;
to receive the wounds of your love
and to behold you in glory and light;
for your own name's sake. Amen.

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The psalms and the invitation to the Lord's Prayer are from _Celebrating Common
Prayer_ (Mowbray), (c) The Society of Saint Francis 1992, which is used with
permission.

The canticle is from _Common Worship: Daily Prayer, Preliminary
Edition_, copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2002.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The opening prayer of thanksgiving is by Thomas Ken (1637-1711) and the closing prayer
is by St. Bridget of Sweden (1303-1373).

Born at Epworth Rectory in Lincolnshire, John Wesley was the son of an
Anglican clergyman and a Puritan mother. He entered Holy Orders and,
following a religious experience on this day in 1738, began an itinerant ministry
which recognised no parish boundaries. This resulted, after his death, in the
development of a world-wide Methodist Church. His spirituality involved an
Arminian affirmation of grace, frequent communion and a disciplined corporate
search for holiness. His open-air preaching, concern for education and for the
poor, liturgical revision, organisation of local societies and training of
preachers provided a firm basis for Christian growth and mission in England.

Charles shared with his brother John the building up of early Methodist
societies, as they travelled the country. His special concern was that early
Methodists should remain loyal to Anglicanism. He married and settled in
Bristol, later in London, concentrating his work on the local Christian
communities. His thousands of hymns established a resource of lyrical piety
which has enabled generations of Christians to re-discover the refining power
of God's love. They celebrate God's work of grace from birth to death, the
great events of God's work of salvation and the rich themes of eucharistic
worship, anticipating the taking up of humanity into the divine life.
John died in 1791 and Charles in 1788. [Exciting Holiness]



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