OREMUS: 26 January 2008

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Fri Jan 25 17:00:01 GMT 2008


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OREMUS for Saturday, January 26, 2008
Timothy and Titus, Companions of Paul

O Lord, open our lips.
And our mouth shall proclaim your praise.

Blessed are you, O God,
in the One you have declared
to be your servant and your Son.
Blessed are you, O God,
in those called to be disciples of Jesus Christ.
Blessed are you, O God,
in your Creator Spirit
who calls us to renew and fashion our lives
into a joyful announcement of your good news.
For these and all your mercies, we praise you:
Father, Son, and Holy Spirit,
Blessed be God for ever!

An opening canticle may be sung. 

http://www.oremus.org/ocan.html

Psalm 90

Lord, you have been our refuge*
 from one generation to another.
Before the mountains were brought forth,
   or the land and the earth were born,*
 from age to age you are God.
You turn us back to the dust and say,*
 'Go back, O child of earth.'
For a thousand years in your sight
   are like yesterday when it is past*
 and like a watch in the night.
You sweep us away like a dream;*
 we fade away suddenly like the grass.
In the morning it is green and flourishes;*
 in the evening it is dried up and withered.
For we consume away in your displeasure;*
 we are afraid because of your wrathful indignation.
Our iniquities you have set before you,*
 and our secret sins in the light of your countenance.
When you are angry, all our days are gone;*
 we bring our years to an end like a sigh.
The span of our life is seventy years,
   perhaps in strength even eighty;*
 yet the sum of them is but labour and sorrow,
   for they pass away quickly and we are gone.
Who regards the power of your wrath?*
 who rightly fears your indignation?
So teach us to number our days*
 that we may apply our hearts to wisdom.
Return, O Lord; how long will you tarry?*
 be gracious to your servants.
Satisfy us by your loving-kindness in the morning;*
 so shall we rejoice and be glad all the days of our life.
Make us glad by the measure of the days
   that you afflicted us*
 and the years in which we suffered adversity.
Show your servants your works*
 and your splendour to their children.
May the graciousness of the Lord our God be upon us;*
 prosper the work of our hands;
   prosper our handiwork.

Psalm 110:1-5

The Lord said to my lord, 'Sit at my right hand,*
 until I make your enemies your footstool.'
The Lord will send the sceptre of your power
   out of Zion,*
 saying, 'Rule over your enemies round about you.
'Princely state has been yours
   from the day of your birth,*
 in the beauty of holiness have I begotten you,
   like dew from the womb of the morning.'
The Lord has sworn and he will not recant:*
 'You are a priest for ever after the order of Melchizedek.'

A Song of the Covenant (Isaiah 42.5-8a)

Thus says God, who created the heavens,  
who fashioned the earth and all that dwells in it; 
Who gives breath to the people upon it  
and spirit to those who walk in it, 
'I am the Lord and I have called you in righteousness,  
I have taken you by the hand and kept you; 
'I have given you as a covenant to the people,  
a light to the nations, to open the eyes that are blind, 
'To bring out the captives from the dungeon,  
from the prison, those who sit in darkness. 
'I am the Lord, that is my name;  
my glory I give to no other.' 

Psalm 149

Alleluia!
   Sing to the Lord a new song;*
 sing his praise in the congregation of the faithful.
Let Israel rejoice in his maker;*
 let the children of Zion be joyful in their king.
Let them praise his name in the dance;*
 let them sing praise to him with timbrel and harp.
For the Lord takes pleasure in his people*
 and adorns the poor with victory.
Let the faithful rejoice in triumph;*
 let them be joyful on their beds.
Let the praises of God be in their throat*
 and a two-edged sword in their hand;
To wreak vengeance on the nations*
 and punishment on the peoples;
To bind their kings in chains*
 and their nobles with links of iron;
To inflict on them the judgement decreed;*
 this is glory for all his faithful people.
   Alleluia!

FIRST READING [2 Samuel 1.1 4, 11 12, 17 19, 23 end]:

After the death of Saul, when David had returned from defeating the Amalekites,
David remained two days in Ziklag. On the third day, a man came from Saul's camp,
with his clothes torn and dirt on his head. When he came to David, he fell to the
ground and did obeisance. David said to him, 'Where have you come from?' He said
to him, 'I have escaped from the camp of Israel.' David said to him, 'How did things
go? Tell me!' He answered, 'The army fled from the battle, but also many of the army
fell and died; and Saul and his son Jonathan also died.'
Then David took hold of his clothes and tore them; and all the men who were with him
did the same. They mourned and wept, and fasted until evening for Saul and for his
son Jonathan, and for the army of the Lord and for the house of Israel, because they
had fallen by the sword.
David intoned this lamentation over Saul and his son Jonathan. (He ordered that The
Song of the Bow be taught to the people of Judah; it is written in the Book of Jashar.)
He said:
Your glory, O Israel, lies slain upon your high places!
   How the mighty have fallen!
Saul and Jonathan, beloved and lovely!
   In life and in death they were not divided;
they were swifter than eagles,
   they were stronger than lions.

O daughters of Israel, weep over Saul,
   who clothed you with crimson, in luxury,
   who put ornaments of gold on your apparel.

How the mighty have fallen
   in the midst of the battle!

Jonathan lies slain upon your high places.
   I am distressed for you, my brother Jonathan;
greatly beloved were you to me;
   your love to me was wonderful,
   passing the love of women.

How the mighty have fallen,
   and the weapons of war perished! 

HYMN 
Words: William Walsham How, 1867
Tune: Llangloffan, St. Catherine,  St. Hilda (St. Edith)

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O Jesus, thou art standing,
outside the fast closed door,
in lowly patience waiting
to pass the threshold o'er:
shame on us, Christian brothers,
his Name and sign who bear,
O shame, thrice shame upon us,
to keep him standing there!

O Jesus, thou art knocking;
and lo, that hand is scarred,
and thorns thy brow encircle,
and tears thy face have marred:
O love that passeth knowledge,
so patiently to wait!
O sin that hath no equal,
so fast to bar the gate!

O Jesus, thou art pleading
in accents meek and low,
"I died for you, my children,
and will you treat me so?"
O Lord, with shame and sorrow
we open now the door;
dear Savior, enter, enter,
and leave us never more.

SECOND READING [Mark 3.20 21]:

The crowd came together again, so that they could not even eat. When his family
heard it, they went out to restrain Jesus, for people were saying, 'He has gone out of
his mind.'

The Benedictus (Morning), 
the Magnificat (Evening), or 
Nunc dimittis (Night) may follow.

Prayer:
Loving God, in Jesus Christ you teach us to pray:

Guide us by your Holy Spirit
that our prayers for others may serve your will
and show your steadfast love for all.
Lord, in your mercy,
hear our prayer.

Gracious God,
you have called together a people
to be the Church of Jesus Christ,
founded on the apostles.
May your people be one in faith and discipleship,
breaking bread together and telling good news.
Lord, in your mercy,
hear our prayer.

May the world come to believe that you are love,
turn to your ways and live in the light of your truth.
Lord, in your mercy,
hear our prayer.

You made all things and called them good.
May your planet earth be held in reverence by all people,
that its resources may be used wisely 
and its fragile balance between life and death respected.
Lord, in your mercy,
hear our prayer.

Hear our prayers for those who rule the nations,
that they may learn wisdom and truth,
establish justice and mercy
and seek the ways of peace.
Lord, in your mercy,
hear our prayer.

Eternal Father,
our refuge from generation to generation,
in Christ your salvation has dawned for your people:
prosper the work of our hands
that the promise of your glorious kingdom
may be fulfilled in our midst;
through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Almighty God,
by the preaching of your apostle Paul
you called your servants Timothy and Titus
and made them his trusted partners
in the work of spreading and establishing your gospel.
Strengthen us in this present time
to stand fast in all our adversities
and to live in true godliness,
that with confidence and gladness
we may look for the glorious appearing
of our Savior Jesus Christ;
who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and for ever. Amen.
       
Believing the promises of God,
let us pray as our Savior has taught us:

- The Lord's Prayer

Equip us, your Church, to serve the human family
as a life-giving leaven,
by drawing men and women 
into a new birth as your beloved children,
through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

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The psalms and the invitation to the Lord's Prayer are from _Celebrating Common
Prayer_ (Mowbray), (c) The Society of Saint Francis 1992, which is used with
permission.

The canticle is from _Common Worship: Daily Prayer, Preliminary
Edition_, copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2002.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The opening prayer of thanksgiving and the closing sentence are adapted from
_Celebrating the Christian Year_ (c) Canterbury Press, Norwich.

The intercession is adapted from a prayer in _The Book of Common Worship. The
Presbyterian Church in Canada_, 1991. 



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