OREMUS: 25 February 2008

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Sun Feb 24 17:00:01 GMT 2008


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OREMUS for Monday, February 25, 2008

O God, make speed to save us;
O Lord, make haste to help us.

Blessed are you, God of compassion and mercy:
your steadfast love is shown to every living thing;
your word calls us forth and your law revives and refreshes.
You call us to repent our misuse of your gifts,
that we may be transformed by your wisdom
to manifest for others
the mercy of our crucified and risen Lord.
For these and all your mercies, we praise you:
Father, Son, and Holy Spirit,
Blessed be God for ever!

An opening canticle may be sung. 

http://www.oremus.org/lentocan.html

Psalm 74 [CCP]

O God, why have you utterly cast us off?*
 why is your wrath so hot
   against the sheep of your pasture?
Remember your congregation that you purchased long ago,*
 the tribe you redeemed to be your inheritance,
   and Mount Zion where you dwell.
Turn your steps towards the endless ruins;*
 the enemy has laid waste everything in your sanctuary.
Your adversaries roared in your holy place;*
 they set up their banners as tokens of victory.
They were like men coming up with axes
   to a grove of trees;*
 they broke down all your carved work
   with hatchets and hammers.
They set fire to your holy place;*
 they defiled the dwelling-place of your name
   and razed it to the ground.
They said to themselves, 'Let us destroy them altogether.'*
 They burned down all the meeting-places of God
   in the land.
There are no signs for us to see;
   there is no prophet left;*
 there is not one among us who knows how long.
How long, O God, will the adversary scoff?*
 will the enemy blaspheme your name for ever?
Why do you draw back your hand?*
 why is your right hand hidden in your bosom?
Yet God is my king from ancient times,*
 victorious in the midst of the earth.
You divided the sea by your might*
 and shattered the heads of the dragons upon the waters;
You crushed the heads of Leviathan*
 and gave him to the people of the desert for food.
You split open spring and torrent;*
 you dried up ever-flowing rivers.
Yours is the day, yours also the night;*
 you established the moon and the sun.
You fixed all the boundaries of the earth;*
 you made both summer and winter.
Remember, O Lord, how the enemy scoffed,*
 how a foolish people despised your name.
Do not hand over the life of your dove to wild beasts;*
 never forget the lives of your poor.
Look upon your covenant;*
 the dark places of the earth are haunts of violence.
Let not the oppressed turn away ashamed;*
 let the poor and needy praise your name.
Arise, O God, maintain your cause;*
 remember how fools revile you all day long.
Forget not the clamour of your adversaries,*
 the unending tumult of those who rise up against you.

Psalm 101

I will sing of mercy and justice;*
 to you, O Lord, will I sing praises.
I will strive to follow a blameless course;
   O when will you come to me?*
 I will walk with sincerity of heart within my house.
I will set no worthless thing before my eyes;*
 I hate the doers of evil deeds;
   they shall not remain with me.
A crooked heart shall be far from me;*
 I will not know evil.
My eyes are upon the faithful in the land,
   that they may dwell with me,*
 and only those who lead a blameless life
   shall be my servants.
Those who act deceitfully shall not dwell in my house,*
 and those who tell lies shall not continue in my sight.

A Song of Praise (Revelation 4.11; 5.9b,10)

You are worthy, our Lord and God,  
to receive glory and honour and power. 
For you have created all things,  
and by your will they have their being. 
You are worthy, O Lamb, for you were slain,  
and by your blood you ransomed for God 
saints from every tribe and language and nation. 
You have made them to be a kingdom and priests 
serving our God,  
and they will reign with you on earth.

Psalm 150

Praise God in his holy temple;*
 praise him in the firmament of his power.
Praise him for his mighty acts;*
 praise him for his excellent greatness.
Praise him with the blast of the ram's-horn;*
 praise him with lyre and harp.
Praise him with timbrel and dance;*
 praise him with strings and pipe.
Praise him with resounding cymbals;*
 praise him with loud-clanging cymbals.
Let everything that has breath*
 praise the Lord.

FIRST READING [2 Kings 5.1 15]:

Naaman, commander of the army of the king of Aram, was a great man and in high
favour with his master, because by him the Lord had given victory to Aram. The man,
though a mighty warrior, suffered from leprosy. Now the Arameans on one of their
raids had taken a young girl captive from the land of Israel, and she served Naaman's
wife. She said to her mistress, 'If only my lord were with the prophet who is in
Samaria! He would cure him of his leprosy.' So Naaman went in and told his lord just
what the girl from the land of Israel had said. And the king of Aram said, 'Go then,
and I will send along a letter to the king of Israel.'
He went, taking with him ten talents of silver, six thousand shekels of gold, and ten
sets of garments. He brought the letter to the king of Israel, which read, 'When this
letter reaches you, know that I have sent to you my servant Naaman, that you may
cure him of his leprosy.' When the king of Israel read the letter, he tore his clothes and
said, 'Am I God, to give death or life, that this man sends word to me to cure a man of
his leprosy? Just look and see how he is trying to pick a quarrel with me.'
But when Elisha the man of God heard that the king of Israel had torn his clothes, he
sent a message to the king, 'Why have you torn your clothes? Let him come to me,
that he may learn that there is a prophet in Israel.' So Naaman came with his horses
and chariots, and halted at the entrance of Elisha's house. Elisha sent a messenger to
him, saying, 'Go, wash in the Jordan seven times, and your flesh shall be restored and
you shall be clean.' But Naaman became angry and went away, saying, 'I thought that
for me he would surely come out, and stand and call on the name of the Lord his God,
and would wave his hand over the spot, and cure the leprosy! Are not Abana and
Pharpar, the rivers of Damascus, better than all the waters of Israel? Could I not wash
in them, and be clean?' He turned and went away in a rage. But his servants
approached and said to him, 'Father, if the prophet had commanded you to do
something difficult, would you not have done it? How much more, when all he said to
you was, "Wash, and be clean"?' So he went down and immersed himself seven times
in the Jordan, according to the word of the man of God; his flesh was restored like the
flesh of a young boy, and he was clean.
Then he returned to the man of God, he and all his company; he came and stood
before him and said, 'Now I know that there is no God in all the earth except in Israel;
please accept a present from your servant.' 

HYMN 
Words: Latin, before the twelfth century;
trans. Thomas Alexander Lacey, 1906
Tune: Das neugeborne Kindelein (Jena), Ecce Tempus

http://www.oremus.org/hymnal/n/n108.html
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Now is the healing time decreed
for sins of heart, of word or deed,
when we in humble fear record
the wrong that we have done the Lord;

who, alway merciful and good,
has borne so long our wayward mood,
nor cut us off unsparingly
in our so great iniquity.

Therefore with fasting and with prayer,
our secret sorrow we declare;
with all good striving seek his face,
and lowly-hearted plead for grace.

Cleanse us, O Lord, from every stain,
help us the meed of praise to gain,
till with the angels linked in love
joyful we tread thy courts above.

Father and Son and Spirit blest,
to thee be every prayer addressed,
who art in threefold Name adored,
from age to age, the only Lord.

SECOND READING [Luke 4.24 30]:

Jesus said, 'Truly I tell you, no prophet is accepted in the prophet's home town. But
the truth is, there were many widows in Israel in the time of Elijah, when the heaven
was shut up for three years and six months, and there was a severe famine over all the
land; yet Elijah was sent to none of them except to a widow at Zarephath in Sidon.
There were also many lepers in Israel in the time of the prophet Elisha, and none of
them was cleansed except Naaman the Syrian.' When they heard this, all in the
synagogue were filled with rage. They got up, drove him out of the town, and led him
to the brow of the hill on which their town was built, so that they might hurl him off
the cliff. But he passed through the midst of them and went on his way.

The Benedictus (Morning), 
the Magnificat (Evening), or 
Nunc dimittis (Night) may follow.

Prayer:
Save your people, Lord, and bless your inheritance,
Govern and uphold them now and always.

Day by day, we bless you;
We praise your name for ever.

Keep us today, Lord, from all sin;
Have mercy on us, Lord, have mercy.

We long for your salvation, O Lord:
grant us understanding, that we may live.

Lord, show us your love and mercy,
For we put our trust in you.

In you, Lord, is our hope:
Let us not be confounded at the last

Righteous God, holy Redeemer,
renew your broken people with your Holy Spirit,
give them a vision of the coming dawn
and the courage to walk your narrow way,
that they may be a sign of hope to the needy
and proclaim the gracious name
of Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.
       
Trusting in the compassion of God,
let us pray as our Savior taught us:

- The Lord's Prayer

God of love,
turn our hearts to your ways;
and give us peace. Amen.

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The psalms and the invitation to the Lord's Prayer are from _Celebrating Common
Prayer_ (Mowbray), (c) The Society of Saint Francis 1992, which is used with
permission.

The canticle is from _Common Worship: Daily Prayer, Preliminary
Edition_, copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2002.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The opening prayer of thanksgiving adapts phrases from _Opening
Prayers: Collects in Contemporary Language_. Canterbury Press,
Norwich, 1999.

The closing sentence is from _New Patterns for Worship_,
copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2002.



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