OREMUS: 18 August 2008

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Sun Aug 17 21:14:33 GMT 2008


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OREMUS for Monday, August 18, 2008
William Porcher DuBose, Priest, 1918

O Lord, open our lips.
And our mouth shall proclaim your praise.

Blessed are you, everloving Father,
your care extends beyond
the boundaries of race and nation,
to the hearts of all who live.
Your Spirit fills us with a living faith,
that we may receive your gift of mercy
and come to sit at the table of your heavenly banquet.
For these and all your mercies, we praise you:
Father, Son, and Holy Spirit:
Blessed be God for ever!

An opening canticle may be sung. 

http://www.oremus.org/ocan.html

Psalm 4

Answer me when I call, O God, defender of my cause;*
 you set me free when I am hard-pressed;
   have mercy on me and hear my prayer.
'You mortals, how long will you dishonour my glory;*
 how long will you worship dumb idols
   and run after false gods?'
Know that the Lord does wonders for the faithful;*
 when I call upon the Lord, he will hear me.
Tremble, then, and do not sin;*
 speak to your heart in silence upon your bed.
Offer the appointed sacrifices*
 and put your trust in the Lord.
Many are saying,
'O that we might see better times!'*
 Lift up the light of your countenance upon us, O Lord.
You have put gladness in my heart,*
 more than when grain and wine and oil increase.
I lie down in peace; at once I fall asleep;*
 for only you, Lord, make me dwell in safety.

Psalm 8

O Lord our governor,*
 how exalted is your name in all the world!
Out of the mouths of infants and children*
 your majesty is praised above the heavens.
You have set up a stronghold against your adversaries,*
 to quell the enemy and the avenger.
When I consider your heavens, the work of your fingers,*
 the moon and the stars you have set in their courses,
What are mortals, that you should be mindful of them?*
 mere human beings, that you should seek them out?
You have made them little lower than the angels;*
 you adorn them with glory and honour.
You give them mastery over the works of your hands;*
 and put all things under their feet,
All sheep and oxen,*
 even the wild beasts of the field,
The birds of the air, the fish of the sea,*
 and whatsoever walks in the paths of the sea.
O Lord our governor,*
 how exalted is your name in all the world!

A Song of the Blessed (Matthew 5.3-10)

Blessed are the poor in spirit,  
for theirs is the kingdom of heaven. 
Blessed are those who mourn,  
for they shall be comforted. 
Blessed are the meek,  
for they shall inherit the earth. 
Blessed are those who hunger 
and thirst after righteousness,  
for they shall be satisfied. 
Blessed are the merciful,  
for they shall obtain mercy. 
Blessed are the pure in heart,  
for they shall see God. 
Blessed are the peacemakers,  
for they shall be called children of God. 
Blessed are those who suffer persecution 
for righteousness' sake,  
for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.
Rejoice and be glad 
for you are the light of the world, 
and great is your reward in heaven. 

Psalm 146

Alleluia!
   Praise the Lord, O my soul!*
 I will praise the Lord as long as I live;
   I will sing praises to my God while I have my being.
Put not your trust in rulers,
   nor in any child of earth,*
 for there is no help in them.
When they breathe their last, they return to earth,*
 and in that day their thoughts perish.
Happy are they who have the God of Jacob
   for their help!*
 whose hope is in the Lord their God;
Who made heaven and earth, the seas,
   and all that is in them;*
 who keeps his promise for ever;
Who gives justice to those who are oppressed,*
 and food to those who hunger.
The Lord sets the prisoners free;
   the Lord opens the eyes of the blind;*
 the Lord lifts up those who are bowed down;
The Lord loves the righteous;
   the Lord cares for the stranger;*
 he sustains the orphan and widow,
   but frustrates the way of the wicked.
The Lord shall reign for ever,*
 your God, O Zion, throughout all generations.
   Alleluia!

FIRST READING [Ecclesiasticus 3:17-end]:

My child, perform your tasks with humility;
   then you will be loved by those whom God accepts.
The greater you are, the more you must humble yourself;
   so you will find favour in the sight of the Lord.
For great is the might of the Lord;
   but by the humble he is glorified.
Neither seek what is too difficult for you,
   nor investigate what is beyond your power.
Reflect upon what you have been commanded,
   for what is hidden is not your concern.
Do not meddle in matters that are beyond you,
   for more than you can understand has been shown to you.
For their conceit has led many astray,
   and wrong opinion has impaired their judgement.

Without eyes there is no light;
   without knowledge there is no wisdom.
A stubborn mind will fare badly at the end,
   and whoever loves danger will perish in it.
A stubborn mind will be burdened by troubles,
   and the sinner adds sin to sins.
When calamity befalls the proud, there is no healing,
   for an evil plant has taken root in him.
The mind of the intelligent appreciates proverbs,
   and an attentive ear is the desire of the wise.

As water extinguishes a blazing fire,
   so almsgiving atones for sin.
Those who repay favours give thought to the future;
   when they fall they will find support. 

HYMN 
Words: Words: Isaac Watts, 1707 
Tune: St. Thomas

http://www.oremus.org/hymnal/c/c330.html
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Come, we that love the Lord,
and let our joys be known;
join in a song with sweet accord,
and thus surround the throne.

Let those refuse to sing,
who never knew our God;
but favorites of the heavenly King,
may speak their joys abroad.

The men of grace have found,
glory begun below.
celestial fruits on earthly ground
from faith and hope may grow.

Then let our songs abound,
and every tear be dry;
we're marching through Emmanuel's ground,
to fairer worlds on high.

SECOND READING [Matthew 1:18-end]:

Now the birth of Jesus the Messiah took place in this way. When his mother Mary had
been engaged to Joseph, but before they lived together, she was found to be with child
from the Holy Spirit. Her husband Joseph, being a righteous man and unwilling to
expose her to public disgrace, planned to dismiss her quietly. But just when he had
resolved to do this, an angel of the Lord appeared to him in a dream and said, 'Joseph,
son of David, do not be afraid to take Mary as your wife, for the child conceived in
her is from the Holy Spirit. She will bear a son, and you are to name him Jesus, for he
will save his people from their sins.' All this took place to fulfil what had been
spoken by the Lord through the prophet:
'Look, the virgin shall conceive and bear a son,
   and they shall name him Emmanuel',
which means, 'God is with us.' When Joseph awoke from sleep, he did as the angel of
the Lord commanded him; he took her as his wife, but had no marital relations with
her until she had borne a son; and he named him Jesus.

The Benedictus (Morning), 
the Magnificat (Evening), or 
Nunc dimittis (Night) may follow.

Prayer:
High and holy God,
robed in majesty,
Lord of heaven and earth,
we pray that you bring justice, faith
and salvation to all peoples.
Lord, hear us.
Lord, graciously hear us.

You chose us in Christ to be your people
and to be the temple of your Holy Spirit;
we pray that you will fill your Church with vision and hope.
Lord, hear us.
Lord, graciously hear us.

Your Spirit enables us to cry, "Abba! Father!",
affirms that we are fellow-heirs with Christ
and pleads for us in our weakness;
we pray for all who are in need or distress.
Lord, hear us.
Lord, graciously hear us.

In the baptism and birth of Jesus,
you have opened heaven to us
and enabled us to share in your glory:
the joy of the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit
from before the world was made.
May your Church, living and departed,
come to a joyful resurrection in your city of light.
Lord, hear us.
Lord, graciously hear us.

Faithful Defender,
do not let our hearts be troubled,
but fill us with such confidence and joy
that we may sleep in peace and rise in your light;
through Jesus Christ our Savior. Amen.

Almighty God, 
you gave to your servant William Porcher DuBose 
special gifts of grace to understand the Scriptures 
and to teach the truth as it is in Christ Jesus: 
Grant that by this teaching we may know you, 
the one true God, and Jesus Christ whom you have sent; 
who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, 
one God, now and for ever. Amen.
       
Gathering our prayers and praises into one,
let us pray as our Savior has taught us.

- The Lord's Prayer

Grant us so fully to manifest Christ in our lives
that people of all races and creeds 
may be drawn to him who is their whole salvation, 
our Savior Jesus Christ.  Amen.

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The psalms are from _Celebrating Common Prayer_ (Mowbray), (c) The
Society of Saint Francis 1992, which is used with permission.

The canticle is from _Common Worship: Daily Prayer, Preliminary
Edition_, copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2002.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The opening prayer is by Stephen Benner. The closing prayer is a sentence from
_Uniting in Worship_, The Uniting Church in Australia.

The intercession is fro m_New Patterns for Worship_, copyright (c) The
Archbishops' Council, 2002.

The first collect is from _Daily Prayer_, copyright (c) The Scottish
Episcopal Church, 1998. Used with permission. 
http://www.scottishepiscopal.com

The second collect is from _The Proper for the Lesser Feasts and
Fasts_, 3rd edition, (c) 1980 The Church Pension Fund.

William Porcher DuBose is a serious candidate for the title of "greatest
theologian that the Episcopal Church in the USA has produced." He was born
in South Carolina in 1836, and attended the Military College of South Carolina
(now the Citadel) in Charleston (32:48 N 79:58 W), and the University of
Virginia in Charlottesville (38:02 N 78:29 W). He served as a chaplain in the
Confederate Army, and after the War of 1861-1865 served as a parish priest.
In 1871 he became a professor at the University of the South (an Episcopal
institution) in Sewanee, Tennessee, became Dean of the School of Theology in
1894, retired in 1908, and died in 1918.
He was fluent in Greek, and well-read both in Greek philosophy and in the
early Christian fathers. Among his numerous books, the best known are The
Soteriology of The New Testament, The Gospel in The Gospels, and The
Reason of Life. (Soter is the Greek word for "Savior", and soteriology is the
branch of theology that deals with such questions as, "What does it mean to
say that Christ saves us?" "How does his death and resurrection do us any
good?" "How are the benefits of Christ's work applied to the individual?" and
so on.) A quote from one of his articles follows:
"God has placed forever before our eyes, not the image but the very Person of
the Spiritual Man. We have not to ascend into Heaven to bring Him down, nor
to descend into the abyss to bring Him up, for He is with us, and near us, and
in us. We have only to confess with our mouths that He is Lord, and believe in
our hearts that God has raised Him from the dead--and raised us in Him-- and
we shall live." [James Kiefer]



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