OREMUS: 8 April 2008

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Mon Apr 7 17:00:01 GMT 2008


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OREMUS for Tuesday, April 8, 2008
William Augustus Muhlenberg, Priest, 1877

Alleluia! Christ is risen!
The Lord is risen indeed! Alleluia!

Blessed are you, God of glory,
by the Spirit of the risen Christ
you gather us together;
for Christ is the one who walks with us,
who opens the scriptures
and breaks the bread of life.
For these and all your mercies, we praise you,
Father, Son and Holy Spirit:
Blessed be God for ever!

An opening canticle may be sung. 

http://www.oremus.org/eastocan.html

Psalm 61

Hear my cry, O God,*
 and listen to my prayer.
I call upon you from the ends of the earth
   with heaviness in my heart;*
 set me upon the rock that is higher than I.
For you have been my refuge,*
 a strong tower against the enemy.
I will dwell in your house for ever;*
 I will take refuge under the cover of your wings.
For you, O God, have heard my vows;*
 you have granted me the heritage
   of those who fear your name.
Add length of days to the king's life;*
 let his years extend over many generations.
Let him sit enthroned before God for ever;*
 bid love and faithfulness watch over him.
So will I always sing the praise of your name,*
 and day by day I will fulfil my vows.

Psalm 62

For God alone my soul in silence waits;*
 from him comes my salvation.
He alone is my rock and my salvation,*
 my stronghold, so that I shall not be greatly shaken.
How long will you assail me to crush me,
   all of you together,*
 as if you were a leaning fence, a toppling wall?
They seek only to bring me down
   from my place of honour;*
 lies are their chief delight.
They bless with their lips,*
 but in their hearts they curse.
For God alone my soul in silence waits;*
 truly, my hope is in him.
He alone is my rock and my salvation,*
 my stronghold, so that I shall not be shaken.
In God is my safety and my honour;*
 God is my strong rock and my refuge.
Put your trust in him always, O people,*
 pour out your hearts before him, for God is our refuge.
Those of high degree are but a fleeting breath,*
 even those of low estate cannot be trusted.
On the scales they are lighter than a breath,*
 all of them together.
Put no trust in extortion;
   in robbery take no empty pride;*
 though wealth increase, set not your heart upon it.
God has spoken once, twice have I heard it,*
 that power belongs to God.
Steadfast love is yours, O Lord,*
 for you repay everyone according to his deeds.

A Song of Faith (1 Peter 1.3-5,18,19,21)

Blessed be the God and Father  
of our Lord Jesus Christ! 
By his great mercy we have been born anew to a living hope  
through the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead, 
Into an inheritance that is imperishable, undefiled and unfading,  
kept in heaven for you, 
Who are being protected by the power of God through faith,  
for a salvation ready to be revealed in the last time. 
You were ransomed from the futile ways of your ancestors  
not with perishable things like silver or gold 
But with the precious blood of Christ  
like that of a lamb without spot or stain. 
Through him you have confidence in God, 
who raised him from the dead and gave him glory,  
so that your faith and hope are set on God.

Psalm 147:1-12

Alleluia!
   How good it is to sing praises to our God!*
 how pleasant it is to honour him with praise!
The Lord rebuilds Jerusalem;*
 he gathers the exiles of Israel.
He heals the brokenhearted*
 and binds up their wounds.
He counts the number of the stars*
 and calls them all by their names.
Great is our Lord and mighty in power;*
 there is no limit to his wisdom.
The Lord lifts up the lowly,*
 but casts the wicked to the ground.
Sing to the Lord with thanksgiving;*
 make music to our God upon the harp.
He covers the heavens with clouds*
 and prepares rain for the earth;
He makes grass to grow upon the mountains*
 and green plants to serve us all.
He provides food for flocks and herds*
 and for the young ravens when they cry.
He is not impressed by the might of a horse,*
 he has no pleasure in human strength;
But the Lord has pleasure in those who fear him,*
 in those who await his gracious favour.
 Alleluia!

FIRST READING [Isaiah 43:15--44:3]:

I am the Lord, your Holy One,
   the Creator of Israel, your King.
Thus says the Lord,
   who makes a way in the sea,
   a path in the mighty waters,
who brings out chariot and horse,
   army and warrior;
they lie down, they cannot rise,
   they are extinguished, quenched like a wick:
Do not remember the former things,
   or consider the things of old.
I am about to do a new thing;
   now it springs forth, do you not perceive it?
I will make a way in the wilderness
   and rivers in the desert.
The wild animals will honour me,
   the jackals and the ostriches;
for I give water in the wilderness,
   rivers in the desert,
to give drink to my chosen people,
   the people whom I formed for myself
so that they might declare my praise.

But now hear, O Jacob my servant,
   Israel whom I have chosen!
Thus says the Lord who made you,
   who formed you in the womb and will help you:
Do not fear, O Jacob my servant,
   Jeshurun whom I have chosen.
For I will pour water on the thirsty land,
   and streams on the dry ground;
I will pour my spirit upon your descendants,
   and my blessing on your offspring. 

HYMN 
Words: Latin, eighth century; trans. John Chandler, 1837
Tune: Harewood, Gopsal

http://www.oremus.org/hymnal/c/c065.html
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Christ is our cornerstone,
on him alone we build;
with his true saints alone
the courts of heaven are filled:
on his great love
our hopes we place
of present grace
and joys above.

O then with hymns of praise
these hallowed courts shall ring;
our voices we will raise
the Three in One to sing;
and thus proclaim
in joyful song
both loud and long
that glorious Name.

Here, gracious Lord, do thou
for evermore draw nigh;
accept each faithful vow,
and mark each suppliant sigh:
in copious shower
on all who pray,
each holy day
thy blessings pour.

Here may we gain from heaven
the grace which we implore;
and may that grace, once given,
be with us evermore,
until that day
when all the blest
to endless rest     
are called away.    

SECOND READING [1 Peter 4:1-6]:

Since therefore Christ suffered in the flesh, arm yourselves also with the same intention
(for whoever has suffered in the flesh has finished with sin), so as to live for the rest of
your earthly life no longer by human desires but by the will of God. You have already
spent enough time in doing what the Gentiles like to do, living in licentiousness,
passions, drunkenness, revels, carousing, and lawless idolatry. They are surprised that
you no longer join them in the same excesses of dissipation, and so they blaspheme.
But they will have to give an account to him who stands ready to judge the living and
the dead. For this is the reason the gospel was proclaimed even to the dead, so that,
though they had been judged in the flesh as everyone is judged, they might live in the
spirit as God does.

The Benedictus (Morning), 
the Magnificat (Evening), or 
Nunc dimittis (Night) may follow.

Prayer:
On this day that the Lord has made, let us give God the glory
and pray for the people he has redeemed.

That we may live as those who believe
in the triumph of the cross: 
Risen Lord, hear our prayer.

That all people may receive the good news of his victory: 
Risen Lord, hear our prayer.

That those born to new life in the waters of baptism
may know the power of his resurrection:
Risen Lord, hear our prayer.

That those who suffer pain and anguish may find healing and peace
in the wounds of Christ:
Risen Lord, hear our prayer.

That in the undying love of Christ,
we may have union with all who have died:
Risen Lord, hear our prayer.

Let us join our voices with the saints in proclaiming
that Christ has given us the victory:

O God, our rock and our refuge,
as Jesus knew the discipline of suffering
and the victory that brings us salvation,
so grant us his fellowship in our weakness
and a place in his unending kingdom. Amen.

God of merciful compassion,
your Son came to heal those 
who were broken in body or spirit, 
and to turn their sorrow into joy:
grant that your Church may possess
the vision and compassion 
of your servant William Augustus Muhlenberg
that we will not close our eyes 
to the plight of the poor and neglected, 
the homeless and destitute, the old and the sick, 
the lonely and those who have none to care for them;
through Jesus Christ our Lord,
who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and for ever. Amen.
       
Rejoicing in the God's new creation,
let us pray as our Redeemer has taught us:

- The Lord's Prayer

Make our hearts burn to go back to the world
and speak your word of life in Jesus' Name. Amen.

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The psalms and the invitation to the Lord's Prayer are from _Celebrating Common
Prayer_ (Mowbray), (c) The Society of Saint Francis 1992, which is used with
permission.

The canticle is from _Common Worship: Daily Prayer, Preliminary
Edition_, copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2002.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The opening prayer of thanksgiving and the closing sentence are adapted from a prayer by
Alan Griffiths.

The second collect is by Stephen Benner and is based on a collect  from
_The Proper for the Lesser Feasts and Fasts_, 3rd edition, (c)
1980 The Church Pension Fund.

 William A. Muhlenberg was born in Philadelphia on 16 September 1796, to a
distinguished German Lutheran family. Attracted to the Episcopal Church by its use of
English, he was ordained in 1817. He was active in promoting the Sunday School
movement, and concerned that the Church should minister to all social groups. He wrote
hymns and compiled hymnals, greatly expanding the range of music in Episcopal churches.

In 1828 he founded, and for twenty years headed, Flushing Institute (later St Paul's
College), a boys' school in Flushing, New York. There he made extensive use of music,
flowers, vestments, and an emphasis on the Church year and on sacramental worship, with
the weekly reception of the sacrament of Holy Communion, while at the same time
preaching with great force and conviction the Reformation doctrines of grace and of
justification by faith. Out of his ministry came inspiration for the establishment of Church
schools and hospitals, and an outreach to the poor.      

In 1846 he founded the Church of the Holy Communion in New York City, with a parish
school, a parish unemployment fund, and trips to the country for poor city children. He
called himself an "Evangelical Catholic," and by his firm stand for Evangelical Faith,
Apostolic Order, and Corporal Works of Mercy, he spoke to all parties in the Church
while belonging to none. As one writer has said, "There was not a significant area of the
Church's life, during his ministry, that he did not elevate and strengthen by the pureness of
his life and the vigor of his consecrated imagination." [James Kiefer]


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