OREMUS: 22 October 2007

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Sun Oct 21 17:00:05 GMT 2007


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OREMUS for Monday, October 22, 2007 

O Lord, open our lips.
And our mouth shall proclaim your praise.

Blessed are you, tireless Guardian of your people,
you are always ready to hear the cry of your chosen ones;
you teach us to rely day and night on your care.
You impel us to seek your enduring justice
and your ever-present help
revealed in your Son, Jesus Christ our Lord.
For these and all your mercies, we praise you:
Father, Son, and Holy Spirit:
Blessed be God for ever.>

An opening canticle may be sung. 

http://www.oremus.org/ocan.html

Psalm 80

Hear, O Shepherd of Israel, leading Joseph like a flock;*
 shine forth, you that are enthroned upon the cherubim.
In the presence of Ephraim, Benjamin and Manasseh,*
 stir up your strength and come to help us.
Restore us, O God of hosts;*
 show the light of your countenance
   and we shall be saved.
O Lord God of hosts,*
 how long will you be angered
   despite the prayers of your people?
You have fed them with the bread of tears;*
 you have given them bowls of tears to drink.
You have made us the derision of our neighbours,*
 and our enemies laugh us to scorn.
Restore us, O God of hosts;*
 show the light of your countenance
   and we shall be saved.
You have brought a vine out of Egypt;*
 you cast out the nations and planted it.
You prepared the ground for it;*
 it took root and filled the land.
The mountains were covered by its shadow*
 and the towering cedar trees by its boughs.
You stretched out its tendrils to the Sea*
 and its branches to the River.
Why have you broken down its wall,*
 so that all who pass by pluck off its grapes?
The wild boar of the forest has ravaged it,*
 and the beasts of the field have grazed upon it.
Turn now, O God of hosts, look down from heaven;
   behold and tend this vine;*
 preserve what your right hand has planted.
They burn it with fire like rubbish;*
 at the rebuke of your countenance let them perish.
Let your hand be upon the man of your right hand,*
 the son of man you have made so strong for yourself.
And so will we never turn away from you;*
 give us life, that we may call upon your name.
Restore us, O Lord God of hosts;*
 show the light of your countenance
   and we shall be saved.

A Song of Deliverance (Isaiah 12:2-6)

'Behold, God is my salvation;
I will trust and will not be afraid;

'For the Lord God is my strength and my song,
and has become my salvation.'

With joy you will draw water
from the wells of salvation.

On that day you will say,
'Give thanks to the Lord, call upon his name;

'Make known his deeds among the nations,
proclaim that his name is exalted.

'Sing God's praises, who has triumphed gloriously;
let this be known in all the world.

'Shout and sing for joy, you that dwell in Zion,
for great in your midst is the Holy One of Israel.'

Psalm 150

Alleluia!
   Praise God in his holy temple;*
 praise him in the firmament of his power.
Praise him for his mighty acts;*
 praise him for his excellent greatness.
Praise him with the blast of the ram's-horn;*
 praise him with lyre and harp.
Praise him with timbrel and dance;*
 praise him with strings and pipe.
Praise him with resounding cymbals;*
 praise him with loud-clanging cymbals.
Let everything that has breath*
 praise the Lord.
   Alleluia!

FIRST READING [Romans 4:13, 19-25]:

For the promise that he would inherit the world did not
come to Abraham or to his descendants through the law but
through the righteousness of faith. He did not weaken in
faith when he considered his own body, which was already
as good as dead (for he was about a hundred years old),
or when he considered the barrenness of Sarah's womb. No
distrust made him waver concerning the promise of God,
but he grew strong in his faith as he gave glory to God,
being fully convinced that God was able to do what he had
promised. Therefore his faith 'was reckoned to him as
righteousness.' Now the words, 'it was reckoned to him',
were written not for his sake alone, but for ours also.
It will be reckoned to us who believe in him who raised
Jesus our Lord from the dead, who was handed over to
death for our trespasses and was raised for our
justification. 

HYMN 
Words:   Marnie Barrell, 1999
Tune: Woodlands

http://www.oremus.org/hymnal/barrell/mb12.html
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Raised on the cross, he draws us to his side
the son of Mary claims his destiny.
Alone, afraid, as one of us he died,
his darkest hour his greatest victory.

Raised from the tomb, he draws us to his side
the son of God calls us to trust his way.
In him we live, transformed and glorified,
God's new creation born on Easter day.

Raised up to God, he draws us to his side
the Lord of earth and heaven takes his place,
the path of life eternal opened wide;
with him forever we shall see God's face.

SECOND READING [Luke 12:13-21]:

Someone in the crowd said to Jesus, 'Teacher, tell my brother to divide the family
inheritance with me.' But he said to him, 'Friend, who set me to be a judge or
arbitrator over you?' And he said to them, 'Take care! Be on your guard against all
kinds of greed; for one's life does not consist in the abundance of possessions.' Then
he told them a parable: 'The land of a rich man produced abundantly. And he thought
to himself, "What should I do, for I have no place to store my crops?" Then he said, "I
will do this: I will pull down my barns and build larger ones, and there I will store all
my grain and my goods. And I will say to my soul, Soul, you have ample goods laid up
for many years; relax, eat, drink, be merry." But God said to him, "You fool! This very
night your life is being demanded of you. And the things you have prepared, whose
will they be?" So it is with those who store up treasures for themselves but are not rich
towards God.'

The Benedictus (Morning), 
the Magnificat (Evening), or 
Nunc dimittis (Night) may follow.

Prayer:
We praise you, God our creator, for your handiwork in
shaping and sustaining your wondrous creation. Especially
we thank you for
     the miracle of life and the wonder of living...
                         (We thank you, Lord.)
     particular blessings coming to us in this day...
     the resources of the earth...
     gifts of creative vision and skillful craft...
     the treasure stored in every human life...

We dare to pray for others, God our Savior, claiming your
love in Jesus Christ for the whole world, committing
ourselves to care for those around us in his name.
Especially we pray for
     those who work for the benefit of others... 
                         (Lord, hear our prayer.)
     those who cannot work today...
     those who teach and those who learn...
     people who are poor...
     the Church in Europe...

Teach us, O Lord,
to serve you with patience,
to follow you with simplicity,
to reverence you with fear
and to love you with our whole heart;
that serving, following, reverencing and loving
we may behold you in the beauty of holiness
and rest in the presence of your glory,
now and forever. Amen.
       
Gathering our prayers and praises into one,
let us pray as our Savior has taught us.

- The Lord's Prayer

Grant us boldness to desire a place in your kingdom,
the courage to drink the cup of suffering,
and the grace to find in service
the glory you promise. Amen.

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The psalms and the invitation to the Lord's Prayer are from _Celebrating Common
Prayer_ (Mowbray), (c) The Society of Saint Francis 1992, which is used with
permission.

The canticle is from _Common Worship: Daily Prayer, Preliminary
Edition_, copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2002.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The opening prayer of thanksgiving and the closing prayer use phrases from a
prayer in _Opening Prayers: Collects in Contemporary Language_.
Canterbury Press, Norwich, 1999.



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