OREMUS: 13 October 2007

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Fri Oct 12 19:26:46 GMT 2007


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OREMUS for Saturday, October 13, 2007 
Edward the Confessor, King of England, 1066

O Lord, open our lips.
And our mouth shall proclaim your praise.

Blessed are you, O God,
our life, our health, our salvation.
You look with mercy on your people;
you stir up in us a saving faith,
that believing, we may be healed,
and being healed, we may worthily give you thanks.
For these and all your mercies, we praise you:
Father, Son, and Holy Spirit:

An opening canticle may be sung. 

http://www.oremus.org/ocan.html

Psalm 71

In you, O Lord, have I taken refuge;*
 let me never be ashamed.
In your righteousness, deliver me and set me free;*
 incline your ear to me and save me.
Be my strong rock, a castle to keep me safe;*
 you are my crag and my stronghold.
Deliver me, my God, from the hand of the wicked,*
 from the clutches of the evildoer and the oppressor.
For you are my hope, O Lord God,*
 my confidence since I was young.
I have been sustained by you ever since I was born;
   from my mother's womb you have been my strength;*
 my praise shall be always of you.
I have become a portent to many;*
 but you are my refuge and my strength.
Let my mouth be full of your praise*
 and your glory all the day long.
Do not cast me off in my old age;*
 forsake me not when my strength fails.
For my enemies are talking against me,*
 and those who lie in wait for my life
   take counsel together.
They say, 'God has forsaken him;
   go after him and seize him;*
 because there is none who will save.'
O God, be not far from me;*
 come quickly to help me, O my God.
Let those who set themselves against me
   be put to shame and be disgraced;*
 let those who seek to do me evil
   be covered with scorn and reproach.
But I shall always wait in patience,*
 and shall praise you more and more.
My mouth shall recount your mighty acts
   and saving deeds all day long;*
 though I cannot know the number of them.
I will begin with the mighty works of the Lord God;*
 I will recall your righteousness, yours alone.
O God, you have taught me since I was young,*
 and to this day I tell of your wonderful works.
And now that I am old and grey-headed, O God,
   do not forsake me,*
 till I make known your strength to this generation
   and your power to all who are to come.
Your righteousness, O God, reaches to the heavens;*
 you have done great things; who is like you, O God?
You have showed me great troubles and adversities,*
 but you will restore my life and bring me up again
   from the deep places of the earth.
You strengthen me more and more;*
 you enfold and comfort me,
Therefore I will praise you upon the lyre
   for your faithfulness, O my God;*
 I will sing to you with the harp, O Holy One of Israel.
My lips will sing with joy when I play to you,*
 and so will my soul, which you have redeemed.
My tongue will proclaim your righteousness all day long,*
 for they are ashamed and disgraced
   who sought to do me harm.

A Song of the Blessed (Matthew 5:3-10)
Blessed are the poor in spirit,
for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.

Blessed are those who mourn,
for they shall be comforted.

Blessed are the meek,
for they shall inherit the earth.

Blessed are those who hunger
and thirst after righteousness,
for they shall be satisfied.

Blessed are the merciful,
for they shall obtain mercy.

Blessed are the pure in heart,
for they shall see God.

Blessed are the peacemakers,
for they shall be called children of God.

Blessed are those who suffer persecution
for righteousness' sake,
for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.

Psalm 149

Alleluia!
   Sing to the Lord a new song;*
 sing his praise in the congregation of the faithful.
Let Israel rejoice in his maker;*
 let the children of Zion be joyful in their king.
Let them praise his name in the dance;*
 let them sing praise to him with timbrel and harp.
For the Lord takes pleasure in his people*
 and adorns the poor with victory.
Let the faithful rejoice in triumph;*
 let them be joyful on their beds.
Let the praises of God be in their throat*
 and a two-edged sword in their hand;
To wreak vengeance on the nations*
 and punishment on the peoples;
To bind their kings in chains*
 and their nobles with links of iron;
To inflict on them the judgement decreed;*
 this is glory for all his faithful people.
   Alleluia!

FIRST READING [Joel 3:12-21]:

Let the nations rouse themselves,
   and come up to the valley of Jehoshaphat;
for there I will sit to judge
   all the neighbouring nations.

Put in the sickle,
   for the harvest is ripe.
Go in, tread,
   for the wine press is full.
The vats overflow,
   for their wickedness is great.

Multitudes, multitudes,
   in the valley of decision!
For the day of the Lord is near
   in the valley of decision.
The sun and the moon are darkened,
   and the stars withdraw their shining.

The Lord roars from Zion,
   and utters his voice from Jerusalem,
   and the heavens and the earth shake.
But the Lord is a refuge for his people,
   a stronghold for the people of Israel.

So you shall know that I, the Lord your God,
   dwell in Zion, my holy mountain.
And Jerusalem shall be holy,
   and strangers shall never again pass through it.

On that day
the mountains shall drip sweet wine,
   the hills shall flow with milk,
and all the stream beds of Judah
   shall flow with water;
a fountain shall come forth from the house of the Lord
   and water the Wadi Shittim.

Egypt shall become a desolation
   and Edom a desolate wilderness,
because of the violence done to the people of Judah,
   in whose land they have shed innocent blood.
But Judah shall be inhabited for ever,
   and Jerusalem to all generations.
I will avenge their blood, and I will not clear the guilty,
   for the Lord dwells in Zion. 

HYMN 
Words: Henry Van Dyke, 1908
Tune: Hymn to Joy

http://www.oremus.org/hymnal/j/j251.html
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Joyful, joyful, we adore thee,
God of glory, Lord of love;
hearts unfold like flowers before thee,
opening to the sun above.
Melt the clouds of sin and sadness;
drive the dark of doubt away;
Giver of immortal gladness,
fill us with the light of day!

All thy works with joy surround thee,
earth and heaven reflect thy rays,
stars and angels sing around thee,
center of unbroken praise.
Field and forest, vale and mountain,
flowery meadow, flashing sea,
singing bird and flowing fountain
call us to rejoice in thee.

Thou art giving and forgiving,
ever blessing, ever blessed,
wellspring of the joy of living,
ocean depth of happy rest!
Thou our Father, Christ our Brother,
all who live in love are thine;
teach us how to love each other,
lift us to the joy divine.

Mortals, join the mighty chorus,
which the morning stars began;
Father-love is reigning o'er us,
brother love binds man to man.
ever singing, march we onward,
victors in the midst of strife,
joyful music leads us sunward
in the triumph song of life.

SECOND READING [Luke 11:27-28]:

While Jesus was saying this, a woman in the crowd raised her voice and said to him,
'Blessed is the womb that bore you and the breasts that nursed you!' But he said,
'Blessed rather are those who hear the word of God and obey it!'

The Benedictus (Morning), 
the Magnificat (Evening), or 
Nunc dimittis (Night) may follow.

Prayer:
Make your ways known upon earth, Lord God,
your saving power among all peoples.

Renew your Church in holiness,
and help us to serve you with joy.

Guide the leaders of this and every nation,
that justice may prevail throughout the world.

Let not the needy be forgotten,
nor the hope of the poor be taken away.

Make us instruments of your peace
and let your glory be over all the earth.

Faithful God, living Saviour,
in youth and old age,
in weakness and adversity,
from the womb to the grave,
may we know your protection
and proclaim your great salvation
in Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Sovereign God,
who set your servant Edward
upon the throne of an earthly kingdom
and inspired him with zeal for the kingdom of heaven:
grant that we may so confess the faith of Christ
by word and deed,
that we may, with all your saints, inherit your eternal glory;
through Jesus Christ your Son our Lord,
who is alive and reigns with you,
in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and for ever. Amen. 
       
Gathering our prayers and praises into one,
let us pray as our Savior has taught us.

- The Lord's Prayer

Give us your saving grace until that day when you welcome us
to the heavenly banquet beyond compare. Amen.

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The psalms and the invitation to the Lord's Prayer are from _Celebrating Common
Prayer_ (Mowbray), (c) The Society of Saint Francis 1992, which is used with
permission.

The canticle is from _Common Worship: Daily Prayer, Preliminary
Edition_, copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2002.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The opening prayer of thanksgiving and the closing prayer use phrases from a
prayer in _Opening Prayers: Collects in Contemporary Language_.
Canterbury Press, Norwich, 1999.

The second collect is from _Common Worship: Services and Prayers for
the Church of England_, material from which is included in this service is
copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2000.

Edward was born in 1003. He was the last Saxon king to rule (for more than a
few months) in England. He is called "Edward the Confessor" to distinguish
him from another King of England, Edward the Martyr (c962-979), who was
assassinated (presumably by someone who wished to place Edward's younger
half-brother on the throne), and who came to be regarded, on doubtful
grounds, as a martyr for the faith. In Christian biographies, the term
"confessor" is often used to denote someone who has born witness to the faith
by his life, but who did not die as a martyr. Edward was the son of King
Ethelred the Unready. This does not mean that he was unprepared, but rather
that he was stubborn and wilful, and would not accept "rede," meaning advice
or counsel.
Aethelred was followed by several Danish kings of England, during whose rule
young Edward and his mother took refuge in Normandy. But the last Danish
king named Edward as his successor, and he was crowned in 1042. Opinions
on his success as a king vary. Some historians consider him weak and
indecisive, and say that his reign paved the way for the Norman Conquest.
Others say that his prudent management gave England more than twenty years
of peace and prosperity, with freedom from foreign domination, at a time when
powerful neighbors might well have dominated a less adroit ruler. He was
diligent in public and private worship, generous to the poor, and accessible to
subjects who sought redress of grievances.
While in exile, he had vowed to make a pilgrimage to Rome if his family
fortunes mended. However, his council told him that it was not expedient for
him to be so long out of the country. Accordingly, he spent his pilgrimage
money instead on the relief of the poor and the building of Westminster Abbey,
which stands today (rebuilt in the thirteenth century) as one of the great
churches of England, burial place of her kings and others deemed worthy of
special honor.
He died on 5 January 1066, leaving no offspring; and after his death, the throne
was claimed by his wife's brother, Harold the Saxon, and by William, Duke of
Normandy. William defeated and slew Harold at the Battle of Hastings (14
October 1066), and thereafter the kings and upper classes of England were
Norman-French rather than Anglo-Saxon. Edward is remembered, not on the
day of his death, but on the anniversary of the moving ("translation") of his
corpse to a new tomb, a date which is also the anniversary of the eve of the
Battle of Hastings, the end of Saxon England.



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