OREMUS: 6 October 2007

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Fri Oct 5 20:16:56 GMT 2007


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OREMUS for Saturday, October 6, 2007 
William Tyndale, Translator of the Scriptures, Martyr, 1536

O Lord, open our lips.
And our mouth shall proclaim your praise. nnn

Blessed are you, O God of justice,
you hear our cry and save us.
You call us to heed your word to the prophets,
you rouse us to the demand of the gospel
and impel us to carry it out.
For these and all your mercies, we praise you:
Father, Son, and Holy Spirit:
Blessed be God for ever.

An opening canticle may be sung. 

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Psalm 62

For God alone my soul in silence waits;*
 from him comes my salvation.
He alone is my rock and my salvation,*
 my stronghold, so that I shall not be greatly shaken.
How long will you assail me to crush me,
   all of you together,*
 as if you were a leaning fence, a toppling wall?
They seek only to bring me down
   from my place of honour;*
 lies are their chief delight.
They bless with their lips,*
 but in their hearts they curse.
For God alone my soul in silence waits;*
 truly, my hope is in him.
He alone is my rock and my salvation,*
 my stronghold, so that I shall not be shaken.
In God is my safety and my honour;*
 God is my strong rock and my refuge.
Put your trust in him always, O people,*
 pour out your hearts before him, for God is our refuge.
Those of high degree are but a fleeting breath,*
 even those of low estate cannot be trusted.
On the scales they are lighter than a breath,*
 all of them together.
Put no trust in extortion;
   in robbery take no empty pride;*
 though wealth increase, set not your heart upon it.
God has spoken once, twice have I heard it,*
 that power belongs to God.
Steadfast love is yours, O Lord,*
 for you repay everyone according to his deeds.

Psalm 63

O God, you are my God; eagerly I seek you;*
 my soul thirsts for you, my flesh faints for you,
   as in a barren and dry land where there is no water;
Therefore I have gazed upon you in your holy place,*
 that I might behold your power and your glory.
For your loving-kindness is better than life itself;*
 my lips shall give you praise.
So will I bless you as long as I live*
 and lift up my hands in your name.
My soul is content, as with marrow and fatness,*
 and my mouth praises you with joyful lips,
When I remember you upon my bed,*
 and meditate on you in the night watches.
For you have been my helper,*
 and under the shadow of your wings I will rejoice.
My soul clings to you;*
 your right hand holds me fast.

A Song of Wisdom (Wisdom 9.1-5a,5c-6,9-11)

O God of our ancestors and Lord of mercy,
you have made all things by your word.

By your wisdom you have formed us
to have dominion over the creatures you have made;

To rule the world in holiness and righteousness
and to pronounce judgement in uprightness of soul.

Give us the Wisdom that sits by your throne;
do not reject us from among your servants,

For we are your servants,
with little understanding of judgement and laws.

Even one who is perfect among us
will be regarded as nothing
without the wisdom that comes from you.

With you is Wisdom, she who knows your works,
and was present when you made the world.

She understands what is pleasing in your sight
and what is right according to your commandments.

Send her forth from the holy heavens,
from the throne of your glory send her.

That she may labour at our side
and that we may learn what is pleasing to you.

For she knows and understands all things,
she will guide us wisely in our actions
and guard us with her glory.

Psalm 149

Alleluia!
   Sing to the Lord a new song;*
 sing his praise in the congregation of the faithful.
Let Israel rejoice in his maker;*
 let the children of Zion be joyful in their king.
Let them praise his name in the dance;*
 let them sing praise to him with timbrel and harp.
For the Lord takes pleasure in his people*
 and adorns the poor with victory.
Let the faithful rejoice in triumph;*
 let them be joyful on their beds.
Let the praises of God be in their throat*
 and a two-edged sword in their hand;
To wreak vengeance on the nations*
 and punishment on the peoples;
To bind their kings in chains*
 and their nobles with links of iron;
To inflict on them the judgement decreed;*
 this is glory for all his faithful people.
   Alleluia!

FIRST READING [Baruch 4:5-12, 27-29]:

Take courage, my people,
   who perpetuate Israel's name!
It was not for destruction
   that you were sold to the nations,
but you were handed over to your enemies
   because you angered God.
For you provoked the one who made you
   by sacrificing to demons and not to God.
You forgot the everlasting God, who brought you up,
   and you grieved Jerusalem, who reared you.
For she saw the wrath that came upon you from God,
   and she said:
Listen, you neighbours of Zion,
   God has brought great sorrow upon me;
for I have seen the exile of my sons and daughters,
   which the Everlasting brought upon them.
With joy I nurtured them,
   but I sent them away with weeping and sorrow.
Let no one rejoice over me, a widow
   and bereaved of many;
I was left desolate because of the sins of my children,
   because they turned away from the law of God.
Take courage, my children, and cry to God,
   for you will be remembered by the one who brought this upon you.
For just as you were disposed to go astray from God,
   return with tenfold zeal to seek him.
For the one who brought these calamities upon you
   will bring you everlasting joy with your salvation. 

HYMN 
Words: Henry Williams Baker, 1861
Tune: Ravenshaw

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Lord, thy Word abideth,
and our footsteps guideth;
who its truth believeth
light and joy receiveth.

When our foes are near us,
then thy Word doth cheer us,
Word of consolation,
message of salvation.

When the storms are o'er us,
and dark clouds before us,
then its light directeth,
and our way protecteth.

Who can tell the pleasure,
who recount the treasure,
by thy Word imparted
to the simple-hearted?

Word of mercy, giving
succor to the living;
word of life, supplying
comfort to the dying!

O that we, discerning,
its most holy learning,
Lord, may love and fear thee,
evermore be near thee!

SECOND READING [Luke 10:17-24]:

The seventy returned with joy, saying, 'Lord, in your name even the demons submit to
us!' He said to them, 'I watched Satan fall from heaven like a flash of lightning. See, I
have given you authority to tread on snakes and scorpions, and over all the power of
the enemy; and nothing will hurt you. Nevertheless, do not rejoice at this, that the
spirits submit to you, but rejoice that your names are written in heaven.'
At that same hour Jesus rejoiced in the Holy Spirit and said, 'I thank you, Father, Lord
of heaven and earth, because you have hidden these things from the wise and the
intelligent and have revealed them to infants; yes, Father, for such was your gracious
will. All things have been handed over to me by my Father; and no one knows who the
Son is except the Father, or who the Father is except the Son and anyone to whom the
Son chooses to reveal him.'
Then turning to the disciples, Jesus said to them privately, 'Blessed are the eyes that
see what you see! For I tell you that many prophets and kings desired to see what you
see, but did not see it, and to hear what you hear, but did not hear it.' 

The Benedictus (Morning), 
the Magnificat (Evening), or 
Nunc dimittis (Night) may follow.

Prayer:
God of the Covenant,
we are your people through your grace in baptism.

Added one by one to your Church,
you bind us together in repentance and true profession of faith:
We are reborn by water and the Spirit.

Accustomed to preserving our selfish autonomy,
you call us to a life of mutual oversight and shared mission.
We are reborn by water and the Spirit.

Teach us to see each other as sisters and brothers
who share a common birth and a family table:
We are reborn by water and the Spirit.

Show us ways to support one another
that our faith is increased, our hope confirmed
and our love perfected.
We are reborn by water and the Spirit.

Offer through your Church hospitality
to those seeking Christ and hope.
We are reborn by water and the Spirit.

To you we come, O Lord,
the true goal of all human desiring,
beyond all earthly beauty,
gentle protector, strong deliverer;
in the night you are our confidence:
from first light be our joy. Amen.

Lord, give to your people grace to hear and keep your word
that, after the example of your servant William Tyndale,
we may not only profess your gospel
but also be ready to suffer and die for it,
to the honour of your name;
through Jesus Christ your Son our Lord,
who is alive and reigns with you,
in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and for ever. Amen.
       
Gathering our prayers and praises into one,
let us pray as our Savior has taught us.

- The Lord's Prayer

Pour out your Spirit, O God, over all the world,
to inspire every heart with knowledge and love of you. Amen.

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The psalms and the invitation to the Lord's Prayer are from _Celebrating Common
Prayer_ (Mowbray), (c) The Society of Saint Francis 1992, which is used with
permission.

The canticle is from _Common Worship: Daily Prayer, Preliminary
Edition_, copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2002.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The opening prayer of thanksgiving and the closing prayer use phrases from a
prayer in _Opening Prayers: Collects in Contemporary Language_.
Canterbury Press, Norwich, 1999.

The second collect is from _Common Worship: Services and Prayers for
the Church of England_, material from which is included in this service is
copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2000.

William Tyndale was born about 1495 at Slymbridge near the Welsh border.
He received his degrees from Magdalen College, Oxford, and also studied at
Cambridge. He was ordained to the priesthood in 1521, and soon began to
speak of his desire, which eventually became his life's obsession, to translate
the Scriptures into English. It is reported that, in the course of a dispute with a
promminent clergyman who disparaged this proposal, he said, "If God spare
my life, ere many years I will cause a boy that driveth the plow to know more
of the Scriptures than thou dost." The remainder of his life was devoted to
keeping that vow, or boast. Finding that the King, Henry VIII, was firmly set
against any English version of the Scriptures, he fled to Germany (visiting
Martin Luther in 1525), and there travelled from city to city, in exile, poverty,
persecution, and constant danger. Tyndale understood the commonly received
doctrine -- the popular theology -- of his time to imply that men earn their
salvation by good behavior and by penance. He wrote eloquently in favor of
the view that salvation is a gift of God, freely bestowed, and not a response to
any good act on the part of the receiver. His views are expressed in numerous
pamphlets, and in the introductions to and commentaries on various books of
the Bible that accompanied his translations. He completed his translation of the
New Testament in 1525, and it was printed at Worms and smuggled into
England. Of 18,000 copies, only two survive. In 1534, he produced a revised
version, and began work on the Old Testament. In the next two years he
completed and published the Pentateuch and Jonah, and translated the books
from Joshua through Second Chronicles, but then he was captured (betrayed
by one he had befriended), tried for heresy, and put to death. He was burned at
the stake, but, as was often done, the officer strangled him before lighting the
fire. His last words were, "Lord, open the King of England's eyes."
Miles Coverdale continued Tyndale's work by translating those portions of the
Bible (including the Apocrypha) which Tyndale had not lived to translate
himself, and publishing the complete work. In 1537, the "Matthew Bible"
(essentially the Tyndale-Coverdale Bible under another man's name to spare
the government embarrassment) was published in England with the Royal
Permission. Six copies were set up for public reading in Old St. Paul's Church,
and throughout the daylight hours the church was crowded with those who had
come to hear it. One man would stand at the lectern and read until his voice
gave out, and then he would stand down and another would take his place. All
English translations of the Bible from that time to the present century are
essentially revisions of the Tyndale-Coverdale work. [James Kiefer,
abridged]



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