OREMUS: 14 November 2007

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Tue Nov 13 21:00:04 GMT 2007


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OREMUS for Wednesday, November 14, 2007 
Samuel Seabury, First Bishop of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the USA, 1796

O Lord, open our lips.
And our mouth shall proclaim your praise.

Blessed are you, ever-living God,
you inscribe our names in your book of life
so that we may share the firstfruits of salvation.
You protect the widows and strangers,
the oppressed and forgotten,
and feed the hungry with good things.
You stand among us in Christ, offering life to all.
You call us to respond with open hearts and minds to the world,
caring for those for whom you care. 
For these and all your mercies, we praise you:
Father, Son and Holy Spirit:
Blessed be God for ever!

An opening canticle may be sung. 

http://www.oremus.org/ocan.html

Psalm 119:73-96

Your hands have made me and fashioned me;*
 give me understanding,
   that I may learn your commandments.
Those who fear you will be glad when they see me,*
 because I trust in your word.

I know, O Lord, that your judgements are right*
 and that in faithfulness you have afflicted me.
Let your loving-kindness be my comfort*
 as you have promised to your servant.
Let your compassion come to me, that I may live,*
 for your law is my delight.
Let the arrogant be put to shame,
   for they wrong me with lies;*
 but I will meditate on your commandments.
Let those who fear you turn to me,*
 and also those who know your decrees.
Let my heart be sound in your statutes,*
 that I may not be put to shame.
Psalm 119:81-88

My soul has longed for your salvation;*
 I have put my hope in your word.
My eyes have failed from watching for your promise,*
 and I say, 'When will you comfort me?'
I have become like a leather flask in the smoke,*
 but I have not forgotten your statutes.
How much longer must I wait?*
 when will you give judgement
   against those who persecute me?
The proud have dug pits for me;*
 they do not keep your law.
All your commandments are true;*
 help me, for they persecute me with lies.
They had almost made an end of me on earth,*
 but I have not forsaken your commandments.
In your loving-kindness, revive me,*
 that I may keep the decrees of your mouth.
Psalm 119:89-96

O Lord, your word is everlasting;*
 it stands firm in the heavens.
Your faithfulness remains
   from one generation to another;*
 you established the earth and it abides.
By your decree these continue to this day,*
 for all things are your servants.
If my delight had not been in your law,*
 I should have perished in my affliction.
I will never forget your commandments,*
 because by them you give me life.
I am yours; O that you would save me!*
 for I study your commandments.
Though the wicked lie in wait for me to destroy me,*
 I will apply my mind to your decrees.
I see that all things come to an end,*
 but your commandment has no bounds.

A Song of the Righteous (Wisdom 3.1,2a,3b-8)

The souls of the righteous are in the hand of God  
and no torment will ever touch them. 
In the eyes of the foolish, they seem to have died;  
but they are at peace. 
For though, in the sight of others, they were punished,  
their hope is full of immortality. 
Having been disciplined a little, 
they will receive great good,  
because God tested them and found them worthy. 
Like gold in the furnace, God tried them  
and, like a sacrificial burnt offering, accepted them. 
In the time of their visitation, they will shine forth  
and will run like sparks through the stubble. 
They will govern nations and rule over peoples  
and God will reign over them for ever.

Psalm 147:13-end

Alleluia!
Worship the Lord, O Jerusalem;*
 praise your God, O Zion;
For he has strengthened the bars of your gates;*
 he has blessed your children within you.
He has established peace on your borders;*
 he satisfies you with the finest wheat.
He sends out his command to the earth,*
 and his word runs very swiftly.
He gives snow like wool;*
 he scatters hoarfrost like ashes.
He scatters his hail like bread crumbs;*
 who can stand against his cold?
He sends forth his word and melts them;*
 he blows with his wind and the waters flow.
He declares his word to Jacob,*
 his statutes and his judgements to Israel.
He has not done so to any other nation;*
 to them he has not revealed his judgements.
   Alleluia!

FIRST READING [Wisdom 6:1-11]:

Listen therefore, O kings, and understand;
learn, O judges of the ends of the earth.
Give ear, you that rule over multitudes,
and boast of many nations.
For your dominion was given you from the Lord,
and your sovereignty from the Most High;
he will search out your works and inquire into your plans.
Because as servants of his kingdom you did not rule rightly,
or keep the law,
or walk according to the purpose of God,
he will come upon you terribly and swiftly,
because severe judgement falls on those in high places.
For the lowliest may be pardoned in mercy,
but the mighty will be mightily tested.
For the Lord of all will not stand in awe of anyone,
or show deference to greatness;
because he himself made both small and great,
and he takes thought for all alike.
But a strict inquiry is in store for the mighty.
To you then, O monarchs, my words are directed,
so that you may learn wisdom and not transgress.
For they will be made holy who observe holy things in holiness,
and those who have been taught them will find a defence.
Therefore set your desire on my words;
long for them, and you will be instructed. 

HYMN 
Words: Samuel John Stone, 1868
Tune: Aurelia

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The Church's one foundation
is Jesus Christ her Lord;
she is his new creation,
by water and the word:
from heaven he came and sought her
to be his holy bride;
with his own blood he bought her,
and for her life he died.

Elect from every nation,
yet one o'er all the earth,
her charter of salvation,
one Lord, one faith, one birth;
one holy Name she blesses,
partakes one holy food,
and to one hope she presses,
with every grace endued.

Though with a scornful wonder
men see her sore oppressed,
by schisms rent asunder,
by heresies distressed;
yet saints their watch are keeping,
their cry goes up, "How long?"
and soon the night of weeping
shall be the morn of song.

Mid toil and tribulation,
and tumult of her war
she waits the consummation
of peace for evermore;
till with the vision glorious
her longing eyes are blessed,
and the great Church victorious
shall be the Church at rest.

Yet she on earth hath union
with God, the Three in one,
and mystic sweet communion
with those whose rest is won.
O happy ones and holy!
Lord, give us grace that we
like them, the meek and lowly,
on high may dwell with thee.

SECOND READING [Luke 17:11-19]:

On the way to Jerusalem Jesus was going through the region between Samaria and
Galilee. As he entered a village, ten lepers approached him. Keeping their distance,
they called out, saying, 'Jesus, Master, have mercy on us!' When he saw them, he said
to them, 'Go and show yourselves to the priests.' And as they went, they were made
clean. Then one of them, when he saw that he was healed, turned back, praising God
with a loud voice. He prostrated himself at Jesus' feet and thanked him. And he was a
Samaritan. Then Jesus asked, 'Were not ten made clean? But the other nine, where are
they? Was none of them found to return and give praise to God except this foreigner?'
Then he said to him, 'Get up and go on your way; your faith has made you well.'

The Benedictus (Morning), 
the Magnificat (Evening), or 
Nunc dimittis (Night) may follow.

Prayer:
God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob,
of apostles and prophets:
in every age you have chosen people to work for you,
by showing justice and doing mercy.
Let the Church share Christ's own work
as prophet, priest and king,
reconciling the world to your law and your love,
and telling of your mighty power.

You have called us out of the world, O God,
and chosen us to witness to the nations.
Give us your Spirit to show the way, the truth and the life
of our Savior Jesus Christ.
Give thanks to God for the Church.
We are a chosen people.

You have appointed us as a royal priesthood, O God,
to pray for people everywhere and to declare your mercy.
We pray especially for the Episcopal Church
and the Churches of the Anglican Communion. 
Give us your Spirit that we may be drawn to each other in love.
Give thanks to God for the Church.
We are the household of God.

You have baptized us into one family of faith,
and named us your children,
the sisters and brothers of Jesus.
Give us your Spirit to live in peace
and serve each other gladly.
Give thanks to God for the Church.
We are a temple for your Spirit.

You have built us up, O God,
into a temple for worship.
Give us your Spirit to know that there is no other foundation for us
than Jesus Christ, our Rock and our Redeemer.
Give thanks to God for the Church.
We are a colony of heaven.

You have joined us in one body, O God,
to live for our Lord in the world.
Give us your Spirit that, working together without envy or pride,
we may serve our Lord and Head.
Give thanks to God for the Church.
We are the Body of Christ.

O God, we are your Church,
called, adopted, built up, blessed and joined to Jesus Christ.
Help us to know who we are
and in all we do to be your servants.
Give thanks to God for the Church.
And trust the Holy Spirit.

Almighty and everlasting God, 
by whose Spirit the whole body of the Church 
is governed and sanctified: 
Receive our prayers and supplications, 
which we offer before you for all people in your holy Church, 
that all its members, in their vocation and ministry, 
may truly and godly serve you; 
through our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. Amen.

Eternal God,
who blessed your servant Samuel Seabury
with the gift of perseverance
to renew the Anglican inheritance
in the churches of North America:
grant us unity in faith, steadfastness in hope,
and constancy in love,
that we may ever be true members
of the body of your Son Jesus Christ,
who is alive and reigns with you
in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and for ever. Amen.
       
Uniting our prayers with the whole company of heaven,
let us pray as our Savior has taught us.

- The Lord's Prayer

Grant that as we serve yo now on earth,
so we may one day rejoice with all the saints
in your kingdom of light and peace,
through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

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The psalms and the invitation to the Lord's Prayer are from _Celebrating Common
Prayer_ (Mowbray), (c) The Society of Saint Francis 1992, which is used with
permission.

The canticle is from _Common Worship: Daily Prayer, Preliminary
Edition_, copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2002.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The opening prayer of thanksgiving and the closing sentence are adapted from
prayers reprinted from _Revised Common Lectionary Prayers_,
copyright (c) 2002 Consultation on Common Texts

The second collect is from _For All the Saints_, (c) General
Synod of the Anglican Church of Canada, 1994.

A crucial date for members of the Episcopal Church in the United States of
America is the consecration of the first Bishop of the Anglican Communion in
the United States. During the colonial era, there had been no Anglican bishops
in the New World; and persons seeking to be ordained as clergy had had to
travel to England for the purpose. After the achievement of American
independence, it was important for the Church in the United States to have its
own bishops, and an assembly of Connecticut clergy chose Samuel Seabury to
go to England and there seek to be consecrated as a bishop.
However, the English bishops were forbidden by law to consecrate anyone
who would not take an oath of allegiance to the British Crown. He accordingly
turned to the Episcopal Church of Scotland. When the Roman Catholic king
James II was deposed in 1688, some of the Anglican clergy (including some
who had been imprisoned by James for defying him on religious issues) said
that, having sworn allegiance to James as King, they could not during his
lifetime swear allegiance to the new monarchs William and Mary. Those who
took this position were known as non-Jurors (non-swearers), and they included
almost all the bishops and clergy of the Episcopal Church in Scotland.
Accordingly, the monarchs and Parliament declared that thenceforth the official
church in Scotland should be the Presbyterian Church. The Episcopal Church
of Scotland thereafter had no recognition by the government, and for some
time operated under serious legal disablities. However, since it had no
connection with the government, it was free to consecrate Seabury without
government permission, and it did. This is why you see a Cross of St. Andrew
on the Episcopal Church flag.
In Aberdeen, 14 November 1784, Samuel Seabury was consecrated to the
Episcopate by the Bishop and the Bishop Coadjutor of Aberdeen and the
Bishop of Ross and Caithness. He thus became part of the unbroken chain of
bishops that links the Church today with the Church of the Apostles.
In return, he promised them that he would do his best to persuade the
American Church to use as its Prayer of Consecration (blessing of the bread
and wine at the Lord's Supper) the Scottish prayer, taken largely unchanged
from the 1549 Prayer Book, rather than the much shorter one in use in
England. The aforesaid prayer, adopted by the American Church with a few
modifications, has been widely regarded as one of the greatest treasures of the
Church in this country. [James Kiefer]


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