OREMUS: 9 November 2007

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Thu Nov 8 21:47:03 GMT 2007


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OREMUS for Friday, November 9, 2007 
Margery Kempe, Mystic, c.1440

O Lord, open our lips.
And our mouth shall proclaim your praise.

Blessed are you, Lover of our souls,
in Jesus, your Incarnate One and our Redeemer,
you have made us no longer strangers and sojourners,
but fellow citizens with the saints 
and members of your household.
For these and all your mercies, we praise you:
Father, Son and Holy Spirit:
Blessed be God for ever!

An opening canticle may be sung. 

http://www.oremus.org/ocan.html

Psalm 109:1-4, 20-30

Hold not your tongue, O God of my praise;*
 for the mouth of the wicked,
   the mouth of the deceitful, is opened against me.
They speak to me with a lying tongue;*
 they encompass me with hateful words
   and fight against me without a cause.
Despite my love, they accuse me;*
 but as for me, I pray for them.
They repay evil for good,*
 and hatred for my love.
But you, O Lord my God,
   O deal with me according to your name;*
 for your tender mercy's sake, deliver me.
For I am poor and needy,*
 and my heart is wounded within me.
I have faded away like a shadow when it lengthens;*
 I am shaken off like a locust.
My knees are weak through fasting,*
 and my flesh is wasted and gaunt.
I have become a reproach to them;*
 they see and shake their heads.
Help me, O Lord my God;*
 save me for your mercy's sake.
Let them know that this is your hand,*
 that you, O Lord, have done it.
They may curse, but you will bless;*
 let those who rise up against me be put to shame,
   and your servant will rejoice.
Let my accusers be clothed with disgrace*
 and wrap themselves in their shame as in a cloak.
I will give great thanks to the Lord with my mouth;*
 in the midst of the multitude will I praise him;
Because he stands at the right hand of the needy,*
 to save his life from those who would condemn him.

A Song of the New Creation (Isaiah 43.15,16,18,19,20c,21)

'I am the Lord, your Holy One,  
the Creator of Israel, your King.' 
Thus says the Lord, who makes a way in the sea,  
a path in the mighty waters, 
'Remember not the former things,  
nor consider the things of old. 
'Behold, I am doing a new thing;  
now it springs forth, do you not perceive it? 
'I will make a way in the wilderness 
and rivers in the desert,  
to give drink to my chosen people, 
'The people whom I formed for myself,  
that they might declare my praise.' 

Psalm 147:1-12

Alleluia!
   How good it is to sing praises to our God!*
 how pleasant it is to honour him with praise!
The Lord rebuilds Jerusalem;*
 he gathers the exiles of Israel.
He heals the brokenhearted*
 and binds up their wounds.
He counts the number of the stars*
 and calls them all by their names.
Great is our Lord and mighty in power;*
 there is no limit to his wisdom.
The Lord lifts up the lowly,*
 but casts the wicked to the ground.
Sing to the Lord with thanksgiving;*
 make music to our God upon the harp.
He covers the heavens with clouds*
 and prepares rain for the earth;
He makes grass to grow upon the mountains*
 and green plants to serve us all.
He provides food for flocks and herds*
 and for the young ravens when they cry.
He is not impressed by the might of a horse,*
 he has no pleasure in human strength;
But the Lord has pleasure in those who fear him,*
 in those who await his gracious favour.
 Alleluia!

FIRST READING [Romans 15:14-21]:

I myself feel confident about you, my brothers and
sisters, that you yourselves are full of goodness, filled
with all knowledge, and able to instruct one another.
Nevertheless, on some points I have written to you rather
boldly by way of reminder, because of the grace given me
by God to be a minister of Christ Jesus to the Gentiles
in the priestly service of the gospel of God, so that the
offering of the Gentiles may be acceptable, sanctified by
the Holy Spirit. In Christ Jesus, then, I have reason to
boast of my work for God. For I will not venture to speak
of anything except what Christ has accomplished through
me to win obedience from the Gentiles, by word and deed,
by the power of signs and wonders, by the power of the
Spirit of God, so that from Jerusalem and as far around
as Illyricum I have fully proclaimed the good news of
Christ. Thus I make it my ambition to proclaim the good
news, not where Christ has already been named, so that I
do not build on someone else's foundation, but as it is
written,
'Those who have never been told of him shall see,
   and those who have never heard of him shall
understand.'

HYMN 
Words: Selection of Hymns from the Best Authors, 1787, by John Rippon
Tune: Foundation, Lyons, St. Denio

http://www.oremus.org/hymnal/h/h376.html
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How firm a foundation, ye saints of the Lord,
is laid for your faith in his excellent word!
What more can he say than to you he hath said,
to you that for refuge to Jesus have fled?

"Fear not, I am with thee; O be not dismayed!
For I am thy God, and will still give thee aid;
I'll strengthen thee, help thee, and cause thee to stand,
upheld by my righteous, omnipotent hand.

"When through the deep waters I call thee to go,
the rivers of woe shall not thee overflow;
for I will be with thee, thy troubles to bless,
and sanctify to thee thy deepest distress.

"When through fiery trials thy pathway shall lie,
my grace, all sufficient, shall be thy supply;
the flame shall not hurt thee; I only design
thy dross to consume, and thy gold to refine.

"The soul that on Jesus hath leaned for repose,
I will not, I will not desert to its foes;
that soul, though all hell shall endeavor to shake,
I'll never, no, never, no, never forsake."

SECOND READING [Luke 16:1-8]:

Jesus said to the disciples, 'There was a rich man who had a manager, and charges
were brought to him that this man was squandering his property. So he summoned him
and said to him, "What is this that I hear about you? Give me an account of your
management, because you cannot be my manager any longer." Then the manager said
to himself, "What will I do, now that my master is taking the position away from me? I
am not strong enough to dig, and I am ashamed to beg. I have decided what to do so
that, when I am dismissed as manager, people may welcome me into their homes." So,
summoning his master's debtors one by one, he asked the first, "How much do you
owe my master?" He answered, "A hundred jugs of olive oil." He said to him, "Take
your bill, sit down quickly, and make it fifty." Then he asked another, "And how much
do you owe?" He replied, "A hundred containers of wheat." He said to him, "Take
your bill and make it eighty." And his master commended the dishonest manager
because he had acted shrewdly; for the children of this age are more shrewd in dealing
with their own generation than are the children of light.

The Benedictus (Morning), 
the Magnificat (Evening), or 
Nunc dimittis (Night) may follow.

Prayer:
Let us with confidence present our prayers and supplications to the throne of
grace.

We pray for all those in positions of power,
that they may govern with wisdom and integrity, 
serving the needs of their people.
May your reign come;
Lord, hear our prayer.

We pray for the Church, the sign of your reign,
that it may extend your welcome to people of every race and background.
May your kingdom come;
Lord, hear our prayer.

We pray for Christians of every denomination,
that together we may come to understand the royal priesthood
you bestowed on us in baptism.  
May your dominion come;
Lord, hear our prayer.

We pray for those whose commitment to truth 
brings them into conflict with earthly powers, 
that they may have the courage to endure.
May your rule come;
Lord, hear our prayer.

We pray for this community of faith,
that attentive to your word, 
we may always worship in spirit and in truth.
May your reign come;
Lord, hear our prayer.

Loving God, 
you have taught us that the power of the heart
is greater than the power of wealth and might.
Hear us as we pray for the fulfilment of your reign.
We ask this through Jesus Christ our King;
to him be glory and power forever. Amen.

Almighty God,
you have built your Church
through the love and devotion of your saints:
we give thanks for your servant Margery Kempe,
whom we commemorate today.
Inspire us to follow her example
that we in our generation may rejoice with her
in the vision of your glory;
through Jesus Christ our Lord,
who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit
one God, now and for ever. Amen.
       
Uniting our prayers with the whole company of heaven,
let us pray as our Savior has taught us.

- The Lord's Prayer

May Christ, who has opened the kingdom of heaven,
bring us to reign with him in glory. Amen.

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The psalms and the invitation to the Lord's Prayer are from _Celebrating Common
Prayer_ (Mowbray), (c) The Society of Saint Francis 1992, which is used with
permission.

The canticle is from _Common Worship: Daily Prayer, Preliminary
Edition_, copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2002.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The opening prayer of thanksgiving is based on Ephesians 2:19.

The closing sentence is from _Common Worship: Daily Prayer_,
copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2004.

Born at Lynn in Norfolk in about 1373, Margery married and had fourteen
children. After she had received several visions, she and her husband went
on a pilgimage to Canterbury. Her fervent denunciations of all pleasure
aroused stiff opposition and she was accused of Lollardy. In 1413 she and
her husband took vows of chastity before the Bishop of Lincoln. She also
made a pilgrimage to the Holy Land. The Book of Margery Kempe, which
is almost the sole source of information about the author, describes her
travels and mystical experiences. It also shows her closeness to the passion
of Christ for the sins of the world. The last reference to her is on a
pilgrimage to Danzig in 1433.


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