OREMUS: 3 March 2007

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Fri Mar 2 22:16:20 GMT 2007


*******************************************************
Visit our website at http://www.oremus.org
There you will find links to each day's Oremus, an archive for the past year,
and the lectionary and calendar we follow. You can access our online
hymnal, collection of liturgical texts and a NRSV Bible Browser at our site.
We also provide links to other forms of Anglican daily prayer
and a site to leave and view prayer requests. An opportunity to support our work
is also now available.
*******************************************************

OREMUS for Saturday, March 3, 2007 
John and Charles Wesley, Evangelists, Hymn Writers, 1791 and 1788

O God, make speed to save us;
O Lord, make haste to help us.

Blessed are you, God, rich in mercy,
you so loved the world 
that when we were dead in our sins,
you sent your only Son for our deliverance.
Lifted up from the earth,
he is light and life;
exalted upon the cross,
he is truth and salvation.
For these and all your mercies, we praise you:
Father, Son, and Holy Spirit,
Blessed be God for ever!

An opening canticle may be sung. 

http://www.oremus.org/lentocan.html

Psalm 135

Praise the name of the Lord;*
 give praise, you servants of the Lord,
You who stand in the house of the Lord,*
 in the courts of the house of our God.
Praise the Lord, for the Lord is good;*
 sing praises to his name, for it is lovely.
For the Lord has chosen Jacob for himself*
 and Israel for his own possession.
For I know that the Lord is great,*
 and that our Lord is above all gods.
The Lord does whatever pleases him,
   in heaven and on earth,*
 in the seas and all the deeps.
He brings up rain clouds from the ends of the earth;*
 he sends out lightning with the rain,
   and brings the winds out of his storehouse.
It was he who struck down the first-born of Egypt,*
 the first-born both of human and beast.
He sent signs and wonders
   into the midst of you, O Egypt,*
 against Pharaoh and all his servants.
He overthrew many nations*
 and put mighty kings to death:
Sihon, king of the Amorites,
   and Og, the king of Bashan,*
 and all the kingdoms of Canaan.
He gave their land to be an inheritance,*
 an inheritance for Israel his people.
O Lord, your name is everlasting;*
 your renown, O Lord, endures from age to age.
For the Lord gives his people justice*
 and shows compassion to his servants.
The idols of the heathen are silver and gold,*
 the work of human hands.
They have mouths, but they cannot speak;*
 eyes have they, but they cannot see.
They have ears, but they cannot hear;*
 neither is there any breath in their mouth.
Those who make them are like them,*
 and so are all who put their trust in them.
Bless the Lord, O house of Israel;*
 O house of Aaron, bless the Lord.
Bless the Lord, O house of Levi;*
 you who fear the Lord, bless the Lord.
Blessed be the Lord out of Zion,*
 who dwells in Jerusalem.

A Song of Repentance (1 John 1:5-9)

This is the message we have heard from Christ
and proclaim to you:
that God is light,
in whom there is no darkness at all.

If we say that we have fellowship with God
while we walk in darkness,
we lie and do not do what is true.

But if we walk in the light
as God is in the light,
we have fellowship with one another.

And the blood of Jesus, the Son of God,
cleanses us from all our sins.

If we say that we have no sin,
we deceive ourselves
and the truth is not in us.

If we confess our sins,
the One who is faithful and just will forgive us
and cleanse us from all unrighteousness.

Psalm 149

Sing to the Lord a new song;*
 sing his praise in the congregation of the faithful.
Let Israel rejoice in his maker;*
 let the children of Zion be joyful in their king.
Let them praise his name in the dance;*
 let them sing praise to him with timbrel and harp.
For the Lord takes pleasure in his people*
 and adorns the poor with victory.
Let the faithful rejoice in triumph;*
 let them be joyful on their beds.
Let the praises of God be in their throat*
 and a two-edged sword in their hand;
To wreak vengeance on the nations*
 and punishment on the peoples;
To bind their kings in chains*
 and their nobles with links of iron;
To inflict on them the judgement decreed;*
 this is glory for all his faithful people.

FIRST READING [Jeremiah 22:1-9,13-17]:

Thus says the Lord: Go down to the house of the king of
Judah, and speak there this word, and say: Hear the word
of the Lord, O King of Judah sitting on the throne of
David you, and your servants, and your people who enter
these gates. Thus says the Lord: Act with justice and
righteousness, and deliver from the hand of the oppressor
anyone who has been robbed. And do no wrong or violence
to the alien, the orphan, and the widow, nor shed
innocent blood in this place. For if you will indeed obey
this word, then through the gates of this house shall
enter kings who sit on the throne of David, riding in
chariots and on horses, they, and their servants, and
their people. But if you will not heed these words, I
swear by myself, says the Lord, that this house shall
become a desolation. For thus says the Lord concerning
the house of the king of Judah:
You are like Gilead to me,
   like the summit of Lebanon;
but I swear that I will make you a desert,
   an uninhabited city.
I will prepare destroyers against you,
   all with their weapons;
they shall cut down your choicest cedars
   and cast them into the fire.

And many nations will pass by this city, and all of them
will say one to another, 'Why has the Lord dealt in this
way with that great city?' And they will answer, 'Because
they abandoned the covenant of the Lord their God, and
worshipped other gods and served them.'

Woe to him who builds his house by unrighteousness,
   and his upper rooms by injustice;
who makes his neighbours work for nothing,
   and does not give them their wages;
who says, 'I will build myself a spacious house
   with large upper rooms',
and who cuts out windows for it,
   panelling it with cedar,
   and painting it with vermilion.
Are you a king
   because you compete in cedar?
Did not your father eat and drink
   and do justice and righteousness?
   Then it was well with him.
He judged the cause of the poor and needy;
   then it was well.
Is not this to know me?
   says the Lord.
But your eyes and heart
   are only on your dishonest gain,
for shedding innocent blood,
   and for practising oppression and violence. 

HYMN 
Words: John and Charles Wesley, 1745
Tune: Das neugeborne Kindelein
<a
href="http://www.oremus.org/hymnal/o/o624.html">http://www.oremus.org/hymnal/o
/o624.html
Hit "Back" in your browser to return to Oremus.

O thou, before the world began,
ordained a sacrifice for man,
and by the eternal Spirit made
an offering in the sinner's stead;
our everlasting Priest art thou,
pleading thy death for sinners now.

Thy offering still continues new
before the righteous Father's view;
thyself the Lamb forever slain;
thy priesthood doth unchanged remain;
thy years, O God, can never fail,
nor thy blest work within the veil.

O that our faith may never move,
but stand unshaken as thy love,
sure evidence of things unseen;
now let it pass the years between
and view thee bleeding on the tree:
my Lord, my God, who dies for me.

SECOND READING [Matthew 23:37-39]:

Jesus said, 'Jerusalem, Jerusalem, the city that kills the prophets and stones those who
are sent to it! How often have I desired to gather your children together as a hen
gathers her brood under her wings, and you were not willing! See, your house is left to
you, desolate. For I tell you, you will not see me again until you say, "Blessed is the
one who comes in the name of the Lord." '

The Benedictus (Morning), 
the Magnificat (Evening), or 
Nunc dimittis (Night) may follow.

Prayer:
Great and wonderful God, we praise and thank you for the
gift of renewal in Jesus Christ. Especially we thank you
for
     opportunities for rest and recreation...
                         (We thank you, Lord.)
     the regenerating gifts of the Holy Spirit...
     activities shared by young and old...
     fun and laughter...
     every service that proclaims your love...

You make all things new, O God, and we offer our prayers
for the renewal of the whole world and the healing of its
wounds. Especially we pray for
     those who have no leisure...
                         (Lord, hear our prayer.)
     people enslaved by addictions...
     those who entertain and enlighten...
     those confronted with temptation...
     the church in North America...

O God, by your Word 
you marvelously carry out the work of reconciliation: 
Grant that in our Lenten fast we may be devoted to you with all our hearts, 
and united with one another in prayer and holy love; 
through Jesus Christ our Lord, 
who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, 
one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

Lord God, 
you inspired your servants John and Charles Wesley 
with burning zeal for the sanctification of souls, 
and endowed them with eloquence in speech and song: 
Kindle in your Church, we entreat you, such fervor, 
that those whose faith has cooled may be warmed, 
and those who have not known Christ 
may turn to him and be saved;
through him who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and for ever. Amen.
       
Trusting in the compassion of God,
let us pray as our Savior taught us:

- The Lord's Prayer

May God give us
his comfort and his peace,
his light and his joy,
in this world and the next. Amen.

*******************************************************
The psalms and the invitation to the Lord's Prayer are from _Celebrating Common
Prayer_ (Mowbray), (c) The Society of Saint Francis 1992, which is used with
permission.

The canticle is from _Common Worship: Daily Prayer, Preliminary
Edition_, copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2002.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The opening prayer of thanksgiving adapts phrases from _Opening
Prayers: Collects in Contemporary Language_. Canterbury Press,
Norwich, 1999.

The closing sentence is from _New Patterns for Worship_,
copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2002.

The collects are from _The Proper for the Lesser Feasts and
Fasts_, 3rd edition, (c) 1980 The Church Pension Fund.

Born at Epworth Rectory in Lincolnshire, John Wesley was the son of an
Anglican clergyman and a Puritan mother. He entered Holy Orders and,
following a religious experience on this day in 1738, began an itinerant ministry
which recognised no parish boundaries. This resulted, after his death, in the
development of a world-wide Methodist Church. His spirituality involved an
Arminian affirmation of grace, frequent communion and a disciplined corporate
search for holiness. His open-air preaching, concern for education and for the
poor, liturgical revision, organisation of local societies and training of
preachers provided a firm basis for Christian growth and mission in England.

Charles shared with his brother John the building up of early Methodist
societies, as they travelled the country. His special concern was that early
Methodists should remain loyal to Anglicanism. He married and settled in
Bristol, later in London, concentrating his work on the local Christian
communities. His thousands of hymns established a resource of lyrical piety
which has enabled generations of Christians to re-discover the refining power
of God's love. They celebrate God's work of grace from birth to death, the
great events of God's work of salvation and the rich themes of eucharistic
worship, anticipating the taking up of humanity into the divine life.
John died in 1791 and Charles in 1788. [Exciting Holiness]


More information about the oremus mailing list