OREMUS: 19 December 2007

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Tue Dec 18 21:10:23 GMT 2007


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OREMUS for Wednesday, December 19, 2007 
O Radix Jesse

O Lord, open our lips.
And our mouth shall proclaim your praise.

Blessed are you, God of mercy and might!
You sent your Son, the Word born in silence,
to be born as the majestic fruit of Jesse's stem,
standing as a sign to the people of Israel,
and King before whom all kings shall shut their mouths
and whom all nations shall seek.
For these and all your mercies, we praise you:
Father, Son, and Holy Spirit,
Blessed be God for ever!

An opening canticle may be sung. 

http://www.oremus.org/ocan.html

Psalm 37:1-28

Do not fret yourself because of evildoers;*
 do not be jealous of those who do wrong.
For they shall soon wither like the grass,*
 and like the green grass fade away.
Put your trust in the Lord and do good;*
 dwell in the land and feed on its riches.
Take delight in the Lord,*
 and he shall give you your heart's desire.
Commit your way to the Lord
   and put your trust in him,*
 and he will bring it to pass.
He will make your righteousness as clear as the light*
 and your just dealing as the noonday.
Be still before the Lord*
 and wait patiently for him.
Do not fret yourself over the one who prospers,*
 the one who succeeds in evil schemes.
Refrain from anger, leave rage alone;*
 do not fret yourself; it leads only to evil.
For evildoers shall be cut off,*
 but those who wait upon the Lord
   shall possess the land.
In a little while the wicked shall be no more;*
 you shall search out their place,
   but they will not be there.
But the lowly shall possess the land;*
 they will delight in abundance of peace.
The wicked plot against the righteous*
 and gnash at them with their teeth.
The Lord laughs at the wicked,*
 because he sees that their day will come.
The wicked draw their sword and bend their bow
   to strike down the poor and needy,*
 to slaughter those who are upright in their ways.
Their sword shall go through their own heart,*
 and their bow shall be broken.
The little that the righteous have*
 is better than great riches of the wicked.
For the power of the wicked shall be broken,*
 but the Lord upholds the righteous.
The Lord cares for the lives of the godly,*
 and their inheritance shall last for ever.
They shall not be ashamed in bad times,*
 and in days of famine they shall have enough.
As for the wicked, they shall perish,*
 and the enemies of the Lord,
   like the glory of the meadows, shall vanish;
   they shall vanish like smoke.
The wicked borrow and do not repay,*
 but the righteous are generous in giving.
Those who are blessed by God shall possess the land,*
 but those who are cursed by him shall be destroyed.
Our steps are directed by the Lord;*
 he strengthens those in whose way he delights.
If they stumble, they shall not fall headlong,*
 for the Lord holds them by the hand.
I have been young and now I am old,*
 but never have I seen the righteous forsaken,
   or their children begging bread.
The righteous are always generous in their lending,*
 and their children shall be a blessing.
Turn from evil and do good,*
 and dwell in the land for ever.

A Song of the Wilderness (Isaiah 35.1,2b-4a,4c-6,10)

The wilderness and the dry land shall rejoice,
the desert shall blossom and burst into song.

They shall see the glory of the Lord,
the majesty of our God.

Strengthen the weary hands,
and make firm the feeble knees.

Say to the anxious, 'Be strong, fear not,
your God is coming with judgement,
coming with judgement to save you.'

Then shall the eyes of the blind be opened,
and the ears of the deaf unstopped;

Then shall the lame leap like a hart,
and the tongue of the dumb sing for joy.

For waters shall break forth in the wilderness,
and streams in the desert;

The ransomed of the Lord shall return with singing,
with everlasting joy upon their heads.

Joy and gladness shall be theirs,
and sorrow and sighing shall flee away.

Psalm 147:1-12

Alleluia!
   How good it is to sing praises to our God!*
 how pleasant it is to honour him with praise!
The Lord rebuilds Jerusalem;*
 he gathers the exiles of Israel.
He heals the brokenhearted*
 and binds up their wounds.
He counts the number of the stars*
 and calls them all by their names.
Great is our Lord and mighty in power;*
 there is no limit to his wisdom.
The Lord lifts up the lowly,*
 but casts the wicked to the ground.
Sing to the Lord with thanksgiving;*
 make music to our God upon the harp.
He covers the heavens with clouds*
 and prepares rain for the earth;
He makes grass to grow upon the mountains*
 and green plants to serve us all.
He provides food for flocks and herds*
 and for the young ravens when they cry.
He is not impressed by the might of a horse,*
 he has no pleasure in human strength;
But the Lord has pleasure in those who fear him,*
 in those who await his gracious favour.
 Alleluia!

FIRST READING [Judges 13.2 7, 24 end]:

There was a certain man of Zorah, of the tribe of the Danites, whose name was
Manoah. His wife was barren, having borne no children. And the angel of the Lord
appeared to the woman and said to her, 'Although you are barren, having borne no
children, you shall conceive and bear a son. Now be careful not to drink wine or
strong drink, or to eat anything unclean, for you shall conceive and bear a son. No
razor is to come on his head, for the boy shall be a nazirite to God from birth. It is he
who shall begin to deliver Israel from the hand of the Philistines.' Then the woman
came and told her husband, 'A man of God came to me, and his appearance was like
that of an angel of God, most awe-inspiring; I did not ask him where he came from,
and he did not tell me his name; but he said to me, "You shall conceive and bear a son.
So then drink no wine or strong drink, and eat nothing unclean, for the boy shall be a
nazirite to God from birth to the day of his death." '
The woman bore a son, and named him Samson. The boy grew, and the Lord blessed
him. The spirit of the Lord began to stir him in Mahaneh-dan, between Zorah and
Eshtaol. 

HYMN 
Words: tanzas 1-2: German, fifteenth century carol; trans. Theodore Baker,
1894.
stanzas 3-4: Friedrich Layritz (1808-1859); trans. Harriet Reynolds Krauth
(1845-1925).
Tune: Es ist ein Ros
<a
href="http://www.oremus.org/hymnal/l/l189.html">http://www.oremus.org/hymnal/l/l
189.html
Hit "Back" in your browser to return to Oremus.

Lo, how a Rose e'er blooming
from tender stem hath sprung!
of Jesse's lineage coming,
as those of old have sung.
It came, a floweret bright,
amid the cold of winter,
when half spent was the night.

Isaiah 'twas foretold it,
the Rose I have in mind;
with Mary we behold it,
the Virgin Mother kind.
To show God's love aright,
she bore to us a Savior,
when half spent was the night.

The shepherds heard the story
proclaimed by angels bright,
how Christ, the Lord of glory
was born on earth this night.
To Bethlehem they sped
and in the manger they found him,
as angel heralds said.

This Flower, whose fragrance tender
with sweetness fills the air,
dispels with glorious splendor
the darkness everywhere;
true man, yet very God,
from sin and death he saves us,
and lightens every load.

SECOND READING [Luke 1.5 25]:

In the days of King Herod of Judea, there was a priest named Zechariah, who
belonged to the priestly order of Abijah. His wife was a descendant of Aaron, and her
name was Elizabeth. Both of them were righteous before God, living blamelessly
according to all the commandments and regulations of the Lord. But they had no
children, because Elizabeth was barren, and both were getting on in years.
Once when he was serving as priest before God and his section was on duty, he was
chosen by lot, according to the custom of the priesthood, to enter the sanctuary of the
Lord and offer incense. Now at the time of the incense-offering, the whole assembly of
the people was praying outside. Then there appeared to him an angel of the Lord,
standing at the right side of the altar of incense. When Zechariah saw him, he was
terrified; and fear overwhelmed him. But the angel said to him, 'Do not be afraid,
Zechariah, for your prayer has been heard. Your wife Elizabeth will bear you a son,
and you will name him John. You will have joy and gladness, and many will rejoice at
his birth, for he will be great in the sight of the Lord. He must never drink wine or
strong drink; even before his birth he will be filled with the Holy Spirit. He will turn
many of the people of Israel to the Lord their God. With the spirit and power of Elijah
he will go before him, to turn the hearts of parents to their children, and the
disobedient to the wisdom of the righteous, to make ready a people prepared for the
Lord.' Zechariah said to the angel, 'How will I know that this is so? For I am an old
man, and my wife is getting on in years.' The angel replied, 'I am Gabriel. I stand in
the presence of God, and I have been sent to speak to you and to bring you this good
news. But now, because you did not believe my words, which will be fulfilled in their
time, you will become mute, unable to speak, until the day these things occur.'
Meanwhile, the people were waiting for Zechariah, and wondered at his delay in the
sanctuary. When he did come out, he could not speak to them, and they realized that
he had seen a vision in the sanctuary. He kept motioning to them and remained unable
to speak. When his time of service was ended, he went to his home.
After those days his wife Elizabeth conceived, and for five months she remained in
seclusion. She said, 'This is what the Lord has done for me when he looked favourably
on me and took away the disgrace I have endured among my people.' 

The Benedictus (Morning), 
the Magnificat (Evening), or 
Nunc dimittis (Night) may follow.

Prayer:
As we look forward to your coming,
we call to mind our sins.

The hatred which divides nation from nation,
race from race, class from class:
Father forgive.

The covetous desires of people and nations
to possess what is not their own:
Father forgive.

The greed which exploits the work of human hands
and lays waste the earth:
Father forgive.

Our envy of the welfare and happiness of others:
Father forgive.

Our indifference to the plight
of the imprisoned, the homeless and the refugee:
Father forgive.

The lust which dishonors
the bodies of men, women and children:
Father forgive.

The pride which leads us to trust in ourselves
and not in God:
Father forgive.

O Root of Jesse,
master of the universe and ruler of the house of Israel,
your mighty acts have rescued remnants of your people
from the midst of slavery, exile, war, and holocaust:
Raise your scepter over us, that your saving rule
may be extended to all people in all places,
for the sake of him whom we know as Lord of all,
even Jesus, the Christ. Amen.

Awaiting his coming in glory,
let us pray as our Savior has taught us:

- The Lord's Prayer

Music may be found <a
href="http://www.oremus.org/hymnal/mid/veniemma.mid">here

O come, thou Branch of Jesse's tree,
free them from Satan's tyranny
that trust thy mighty power to save,
and give them victory o'er the grave. 
Rejoice! Rejoice! Emmanuel
shall come to thee, O Israel!

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The psalms and the invitation to the Lord's Prayer are from _Celebrating Common
Prayer_ (Mowbray), (c) The Society of Saint Francis 1992, which is used with
permission.

The canticle is from _Common Worship: Daily Prayer, Preliminary
Edition_, copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2002.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The opening prayer of thanksgiving is adapted by Stephen Benner from
_We Give You Thanks and Praise: The Ambrosian Eucharistic
Prefaces_, translated by Alan Griffiths, (c) The Canterbury Press
Norwich, 1999.

The closing prayer is adapted from a prayer from _Common Worship:
Services and Prayers for the Church of England_, material from which is
included in this service is copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2000.



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