OREMUS: 31 August 2007

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Thu Aug 30 19:27:40 GMT 2007


*******************************************************
Visit our website at http://www.oremus.org
There you will find links to each day's Oremus, an archive for the past year,
and the lectionary and calendar we follow. You can access our online
hymnal, collection of liturgical texts and a NRSV Bible Browser at our site.
We also provide links to other forms of Anglican daily prayer
and a site to leave and view prayer requests. An opportunity to support our work
is also now available.
*******************************************************

OREMUS for Friday, August 31, 2007 
Aidan, Bishop of Lindisfarne, Missionary, 651

O Lord, open our lips.
And our mouth shall proclaim your praise. nnn

Blessed are you, Holy God,
you liberate the oppressed
and make a way of salvation.
You call us to unite ourselves with all who cry for justice,
and lead us together into freedom
through our Lord and Liberator,
Jesus Christ.
For these and all your mercies, we praise you:
Father, Son, and Holy Spirit:
Blessed be God for ever.

An opening canticle may be sung. 

http://www.oremus.org/ocan.html

Psalm 61

Hear my cry, O God,*
 and listen to my prayer.
I call upon you from the ends of the earth
   with heaviness in my heart;*
 set me upon the rock that is higher than I.
For you have been my refuge,*
 a strong tower against the enemy.
I will dwell in your house for ever;*
 I will take refuge under the cover of your wings.
For you, O God, have heard my vows;*
 you have granted me the heritage
   of those who fear your name.
Add length of days to the king's life;*
 let his years extend over many generations.
Let him sit enthroned before God for ever;*
 bid love and faithfulness watch over him.
So will I always sing the praise of your name,*
 and day by day I will fulfil my vows.

Psalm 89:1-9,11-14,18-21,24-29, 52

Your love, O Lord, for ever will I sing;*
 from age to age my mouth will proclaim your faithfulness.
For I am persuaded that your love is established for ever;*
 you have set your faithfulness firmly in the heavens.
'I have made a covenant with my chosen one;*
 I have sworn an oath to David my servant:
'"I will establish your line for ever,*
 and preserve your throne for all generations."'
The heavens bear witness to your wonders, O Lord,*
 and to your faithfulness in the assembly of the holy ones;
For who in the skies can be compared to the Lord?*
 who is like the Lord among the gods?
God is much to be feared in the council of the holy ones,*
 great and terrible to all those round about him.
Who is like you, Lord God of hosts?*
 O mighty Lord, your faithfulness is all around you.
You rule the raging of the sea*
 and still the surging of its waves.
Yours are the heavens; the earth also is yours;*
 you laid the foundations of the world
   and all that is in it.
You have made the north and the south;*
 Tabor and Hermon rejoice in your name.
You have a mighty arm;*
 strong is your hand and high is your right hand.
Righteousness and justice
   are the foundations of your throne;*
 love and truth go before your face.
Truly, the Lord is our ruler;*
 the Holy One of Israel is our king.
You spoke once in a vision
   and said to your faithful people:*
 'I have set the crown upon a warrior
   and have exalted one chosen out of the people.
'I have found David my servant;*
 with my holy oil have I anointed him.
'My hand will hold him fast*
 and my arm will make him strong.
'My faithfulness and love shall be with him,*
 and he shall be victorious through my name.
'I shall make his dominion extend*
 from the Great Sea to the River.
'He will say to me, "You are my Father,*
 my God and the rock of my salvation."
'I will make him my first-born*
 and higher than the kings of the earth.
'I will keep my love for him for ever,*
 and my covenant will stand firm for him.
'I will establish his line for ever*
 and his throne as the days of heaven.
Blessed be the Lord for evermore!*
 Amen, I say, Amen.

A Song of the Justified (Romans 4.24,25; 5.1-5,8,9,11)

God reckons as righteous those who believe,
who believe in him who raised Jesus from the dead;

For Christ was handed over to death for our sins,
and raised to life for our justification.

Since we are justified by faith,
we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ.

Through Christ we have gained access
to the grace in which we stand,
and rejoice in our hope of the glory of God.

We even exult in our sufferings,
for suffering produces endurance,

And endurance brings hope,
and our hope is not in vain,

Because God's love has been poured into our hearts,
through the Holy Spirit, given to us.

God proves his love for us:
while we were yet sinners Christ died for us.

Since we have been justified by his death,
how much more shall we be saved from God's wrath.

Therefore, we exult in God through our Lord Jesus Christ,
in whom we have now received our reconciliation.

Psalm 147:1-12

Alleluia!
   How good it is to sing praises to our God!*
 how pleasant it is to honour him with praise!
The Lord rebuilds Jerusalem;*
 he gathers the exiles of Israel.
He heals the brokenhearted*
 and binds up their wounds.
He counts the number of the stars*
 and calls them all by their names.
Great is our Lord and mighty in power;*
 there is no limit to his wisdom.
The Lord lifts up the lowly,*
 but casts the wicked to the ground.
Sing to the Lord with thanksgiving;*
 make music to our God upon the harp.
He covers the heavens with clouds*
 and prepares rain for the earth;
He makes grass to grow upon the mountains*
 and green plants to serve us all.
He provides food for flocks and herds*
 and for the young ravens when they cry.
He is not impressed by the might of a horse,*
 he has no pleasure in human strength;
But the Lord has pleasure in those who fear him,*
 in those who await his gracious favour.
 Alleluia!

FIRST READING [Jeremiah 12:1-13]:

You will be in the right, O Lord,
   when I lay charges against you;
   but let me put my case to you.
Why does the way of the guilty prosper?
   Why do all who are treacherous thrive?
You plant them, and they take root;
   they grow and bring forth fruit;
you are near in their mouths
   yet far from their hearts.
But you, O Lord, know me;
   You see me and test me my heart is with you.
Pull them out like sheep for the slaughter,
   and set them apart for the day of slaughter.
How long will the land mourn,
   and the grass of every field wither?
For the wickedness of those who live in it
   the animals and the birds are swept away,
   and because people said, 'He is blind to our ways.'

If you have raced with foot-runners and they have wearied you,
   how will you compete with horses?
And if in a safe land you fall down,
   how will you fare in the thickets of the Jordan?
For even your kinsfolk and your own family,
   even they have dealt treacherously with you;
   they are in full cry after you;
do not believe them,
   though they speak friendly words to you.

I have forsaken my house,
   I have abandoned my heritage;
I have given the beloved of my heart
   into the hands of her enemies.
My heritage has become to me
   like a lion in the forest;
she has lifted up her voice against me 
   therefore I hate her.
Is the hyena greedy for my heritage at my command?
   Are the birds of prey all around her?
Go, assemble all the wild animals;
   bring them to devour her.
Many shepherds have destroyed my vineyard,
   they have trampled down my portion,
they have made my pleasant portion
   a desolate wilderness.
They have made it a desolation;
   desolate, it mourns to me.
The whole land is made desolate,
   but no one lays it to heart.
Upon all the bare heights in the desert
   spoilers have come;
for the sword of the Lord devours
   from one end of the land to the other;
   no one shall be safe.
They have sown wheat and have reaped thorns,
   they have tired themselves out but profit nothing.
They shall be ashamed of their harvests
   because of the fierce anger of the Lord. 

HYMN 
Words:  John Milton (1608-1674), 1623
Tune: Monkland

http://www.oremus.org/hymnal/l/l103.html
Hit "Back" in your browser to return to Oremus.             

Let us, with a gladsome mind,
praise the Lord, for he is kind:
Refrain:
for his mercies aye endure,
ever faithful, ever sure.

Let us blaze his Name abroad,
for of gods he is the God: Refrain

He with all commanding might
filled the new-made world with light: Refrain

He the gold-tressŠd sun
caused all day his course to run: Refrain

The horned moon to shine by night,
mid her spangled sisters bright: Refrain

All things living he doth feed,
his full hand supplies their need: Refrain

Let us, with a gladsome mind,
praise the Lord, for he is kind: Refrain

SECOND READING [1 Peter 4:7-11]:

The end of all things is near; therefore be serious and discipline yourselves for the sake
of your prayers. Above all, maintain constant love for one another, for love covers a
multitude of sins. Be hospitable to one another without complaining. Like good
stewards of the manifold grace of God, serve one another with whatever gift each of
you has received. Whoever speaks must do so as one speaking the very words of God;
whoever serves must do so with the strength that God supplies, so that God may be
glorified in all things through Jesus Christ. To him belong the glory and the power for
ever and ever. Amen.

The Benedictus (Morning), 
the Magnificat (Evening), or 
Nunc dimittis (Night) may follow.

Prayer:
We pray for the coming of God's kingdom, saying,
Father, by your Spirit:
bring in your kingdom.

You came in Jesus to bring good news to the poor, 
sight to the blind, freedom to the captives, 
and salvation to your people:
anoint us with your Spirit; 
rouse us to work in his name.
Father, by your Spirit,
bring in your kingdom.

Send us to bring help to the poor 
and freedom to the oppressed:
Father, by your Spirit,
bring in your kingdom.

Send us to tell the world 
the good news of your healing love:
Father, by your Spirit,
bring in your kingdom.

Send us to those who mourn,
to bring joy and gladness instead of grief:
Father, by your Spirit,
bring in your kingdom.

Send us to proclaim that the time is here
for you to save your people:
Father, by your Spirit,
bring in your kingdom.

Remember us, gracious God,
when we cannot see your way and purpose,
and renew in us the joy of your kingdom of light and life.
We ask this in the Name of Jesus Christ the Lord. Amen.

Everlasting God, 
you sent the gentle bishop Aidan 
to proclaim the gospel in England: 
grant us to live as he taught
in simplicity, humility and love for the poor;
through Jesus Christ your Son our Lord,
who is alive and reigns with you,
in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and for ever. Amen.
       
Gathering our prayers and praises into one,
let us pray as our Savior has taught us.

- The Lord's Prayer

May the mind that was in Christ possess us,
the love that is always at the heart of God enlarge us,
and the joy of the Spirit give us kindly eyes and thankful soul.
Amen.

*******************************************************
The psalms and the invitation to the Lord's Prayer are from _Celebrating Common
Prayer_ (Mowbray), (c) The Society of Saint Francis 1992, which is used with
permission.

The canticle is from _Common Worship: Daily Prayer, Preliminary
Edition_, copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2002.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The opening prayer of thanksgiving is based on a prayer from _Common Worship:
Services and Prayers for the Church of England_, material from which is included in
this service is copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2000.

The closing sentence is by Bruce Prewer.

The second collect is from _Common Worship: Services and Prayers for
the Church of England_, material from which is included in this service is
copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2000.

 The Gospel first came to the northern English in 627, When King Edwin of
Northumbria was converted by a mission from Canterbury led by Bishop
Paulinus, who established his see at York. Edwin's death in battle in 632 was
followed by a severe pagan reaction. A year later, Edwin's exiled nephew
Oswald gained the kingdom, and proceeded at once to restore the Christian
mission.
During his exile, Oswald had lived at Columba's monastery of Iona (see 9
June), where he had been converted and baptized. Hence he sent to Iona,
rather than to Canterbury, for missionaries. The first monk to preach was a
man named Corman, who had no success, and returned to Iona to complain
that the Northumbrians were a savage and unteachable race. A young monk
named Aidan responded, "Perhaps you were too harsh with them, and they
might have responded better to a gentler approach." At this, Aidan found
himself appointed to lead a second expedition to Northumbria. He centered his
work, not at York, but in imitation of his home monastery, on Lindisfarne, an
island off the northeast coast of England, now often called Holy Isle.
With his fellow monks and the English youths whom he trained, Aidan restored
Christianity in Northumbria, King Oswald often serving as his interpreter, and
extended the mission through the midlands as far south as London.
Aidan died at the royal town of Bamborough, 31 August, 651. The historian
Bede said of him: "He neither sought nor loved anything of this world, but
delighted in distributing immediately to the poor whatever was given him by
kings or rich men of the world. He traversed both town and country on foot,
never on horseback, unless compelled by some urgent necessity. Wherever on
his way he saw any, either rich or poor, he invited them, if pagans, to embrace
the mystery of the faith; or if they were believers, he sought to strengthen them
in their faith and stir them up by words and actions to alms and good works."
[James Kiefer]



More information about the oremus mailing list