OREMUS: 18 September 2006

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Sun Sep 17 17:48:45 GMT 2006


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OREMUS for Monday, September 18, 2006 
Ninian, Bishop of Galloway, Apostle to the Picts, c

O Lord, open our lips.
And our mouth shall proclaim your praise.

Blessed are you, Shepherding God,
undaunted you seek the lost,
exultant you bring home the found.
You touch our hearts with grateful wonder
at the tenderness of your forbearing love,
revealed in your Son, Jesus Christ. 
Father, Son, and Holy Spirit:
Blessed be God for ever.

An opening canticle may be sung. 

http://www.oremus.org/ocan.html

Psalm 104

Bless the Lord, O my soul;*
 O Lord my God, how excellent is your greatness!
   you are clothed with majesty and splendour.
You wrap yourself with light as with a cloak*
 and spread out the heavens like a curtain.
You lay the beams of your chambers
   in the waters above;*
 you make the clouds your chariot;
   you ride on the wings of the wind.
You make the winds your messengers*
 and flames of fire your servants.
You have set the earth upon its foundations,*
 so that it never shall move at any time.
You covered it with the deep as with a mantle;*
 the waters stood higher than the mountains.
At your rebuke they fled;*
 at the voice of your thunder they hastened away.
They went up into the hills
   and down to the valleys beneath,*
 to the places you had appointed for them.
You set the limits that they should not pass;*
 they shall not again cover the earth.
You send the springs into the valleys;*
 they flow between the mountains.
All the beasts of the field drink their fill from them,*
 and the wild asses quench their thirst.
Beside them the birds of the air make their nests*
 and sing among the branches.
You water the mountains from your dwelling on high;*
 the earth is fully satisfied by the fruit of your works.
You make grass grow for flocks and herds*
 and plants to serve us all;
That they may bring forth food from the earth,*
 and wine to gladden our hearts,
Oil to make a cheerful countenance,*
 and bread to strengthen the heart.
The trees of the Lord are full of sap,*
 the cedars of Lebanon which he planted,
In which the birds build their nests,*
 and in whose tops the stork makes his dwelling.
The high hills are a refuge for the mountain goats,*
 and the stony cliffs for the rock badgers.
You appointed the moon to mark the seasons,*
 and the sun knows the time of its setting.
You make darkness that it may be night,*
 in which all the beasts of the forest prowl.
The lions roar after their prey*
 and seek their food from God.
The sun rises and they slip away*
 and lay themselves down in their dens.
The labourer goes forth to work*
 and to toil until the evening.
O Lord, how manifold are your works!*
 in wisdom you have made them all;
   the earth is full of your creatures.
Yonder is the great and wide sea
   with its living things too many to number,*
 creatures both small and great.
There move the ships,
   and there is that Leviathan,*
 which you have made for the sport of it.
All of them look to you*
 to give them their food in due season.
You give it to them, they gather it;*
 you open your hand and they are filled with good things.
You hide your face and they are terrified;*
 you take away their breath
   and they die and return to their dust.
You send forth your Spirit and they are created;*
 and so you renew the face of the earth.
May the glory of the Lord endure for ever;*
 may the Lord rejoice in all his works.
He looks at the earth and it trembles;*
 he touches the mountains and they smoke.
I will sing to the Lord as long as I live;*
 I will praise my God while I have my being.
May these words of mine please him;*
 I will rejoice in the Lord.
Let sinners be consumed out of the earth,*
 and the wicked be no more.
Bless the Lord, O my soul.*
 Alleluia!

A Song of Divine Love (1 Corinthians 13:4-13)

Love is patient and kind,
 love is not jealous or boastful,
 it is not arrogant or rude.

Love does not insist on its own way,
 It is not angry or resentful.

It does not rejoice in wrongdoing
 but rejoices in the truth.

Love bears all things and believes all things;
 love hopes all things and endures all things.

Love will never come to an end,
 but prophecy will vanish,
 tongues cease and knowledge pass away.

Now we know only in part
 and we prophesy only in part,

But when the perfect comes,
 the partial shall pass away.

When I was a child, I spoke like a child,
 I thought like a child, I reasoned like a child.

But when I became mature,
 I put an end to childish ways.

For now we see only puzzling reflections in a mirror,
 but then we will see face to face.

Now I know only in part;
 then I shall know fully,
 even as I have been fully known.

There are three things that last for ever,
  faith, hope and love,
 but the greatest of these is love.

Psalm 150

Alleluia!
   Praise God in his holy temple;*
 praise him in the firmament of his power.
Praise him for his mighty acts;*
 praise him for his excellent greatness.
Praise him with the blast of the ram's-horn;*
 praise him with lyre and harp.
Praise him with timbrel and dance;*
 praise him with strings and pipe.
Praise him with resounding cymbals;*
 praise him with loud-clanging cymbals.
Let everything that has breath*
 praise the Lord.
   Alleluia!

FIRST READING [Proverbs 22:1-21]:

A good name is to be chosen rather than great riches,
   and favour is better than silver or gold.
The rich and the poor have this in common:
   the Lord is the maker of them all.
The clever see danger and hide;
   but the simple go on, and suffer for it.
The reward for humility and fear of the Lord
   is riches and honour and life.
Thorns and snares are in the way of the perverse;
   the cautious will keep far from them.
Train children in the right way,
   and when old, they will not stray.
The rich rules over the poor,
   and the borrower is the slave of the lender.
Whoever sows injustice will reap calamity,
   and the rod of anger will fail.
Those who are generous are blessed,
   for they share their bread with the poor.
Drive out a scoffer, and strife goes out;
   quarrelling and abuse will cease.
Those who love a pure heart and are gracious in
speech
   will have the king as a friend.
The eyes of the Lord keep watch over knowledge,
   but he overthrows the words of the faithless.
The lazy person says, 'There is a lion outside!
   I shall be killed in the streets!'
The mouth of a loose woman is a deep pit;
   he with whom the Lord is angry falls into it.
Folly is bound up in the heart of a boy,
   but the rod of discipline drives it far away.
Oppressing the poor in order to enrich oneself,
   and giving to the rich, will lead only to loss.

   The words of the wise:

Incline your ear and hear my words,
   and apply your mind to my teaching;
for it will be pleasant if you keep them within you,
   if all of them are ready on your lips.
So that your trust may be in the Lord,
   I have made them known to you today yes, to you.
Have I not written for you thirty sayings
   of admonition and knowledge,
to show you what is right and true,
   so that you may give a true answer to those who sent
you? 

HYMN 
Words: Augustus Montague Toplady, 1775
Tune: Toplady, Redhead (Petra).

http://www.oremus.org/hymnal/r/r082.html
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Rock of ages, cleft for me,
let me hide myself in thee;
let the water and the blood
from thy wounded side which flowed,
be of sin the double cure,
cleanse me from its guilt and power.

Not the labor of my hands
can fulfill thy law's demands;
could my zeal no respite know,
could my tears forever flow,
all for sin could not atone;
thou must save, and thou alone.

Nothing in my hand I bring,
simply to the cross I cling;
naked, come to thee for dress;
helpless look to thee for grace;
foul, I to the fountain fly;
wash me, Savior, or I die.

While I draw this fleeting breath,
when mine eyelids close in death,
when I soar through tracts unknown
see thee on thy judgment throne,
Rock of ages, cleft for me,
let me hide myself in thee.

SECOND READING [Romans 3:9-20]:

What then? Are we any better off? No, not at all; for we have already charged that all,
both Jews and Greeks, are under the power of sin, as it is written:
'There is no one who is righteous, not even one;
   there is no one who has understanding,
     there is no one who seeks God.
All have turned aside, together they have become worthless;
   there is no one who shows kindness,
     there is not even one.'
'Their throats are opened graves;
   they use their tongues to deceive.'
'The venom of vipers is under their lips.'
   'Their mouths are full of cursing and bitterness.'
'Their feet are swift to shed blood;
   ruin and misery are in their paths,
and the way of peace they have not known.'
   'There is no fear of God before their eyes.'

Now we know that whatever the law says, it speaks to those who are under the law,
so that every mouth may be silenced, and the whole world may be held accountable to
God. For 'no human being will be justified in his sight' by deeds prescribed by the law,
for through the law comes the knowledge of sin.

The Benedictus (Morning), 
the Magnificat (Evening), or 
Nunc dimittis (Night) may follow.

Prayer:
High and holy God,
robed in majesty,
Lord of heaven and earth,
we pray that you bring justice, faith
and salvation to all peoples.
Lord, hear us.
Lord, graciously hear us.

You chose us in Christ to be your people
and to be the temple of your Holy Spirit;
we pray that you will fill your Church with vision and hope.
Lord, hear us.
Lord, graciously hear us.

Your Spirit enables us to cry, "Abba! Father!",
affirms that we are fellow-heirs with Christ
and pleads for us in our weakness;
we pray for all who are in need or distress.
Lord, hear us.
Lord, graciously hear us.

In the baptism and birth of Jesus,
you have opened heaven to us
and enabled us to share in your glory:
the joy of the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit
from before the world was made.
May your Church, living and departed,
come to a joyful resurrection in your city of light.
Lord, hear us.
Lord, graciously hear us.

Teach us, O Lord,
to serve you with patience,
to follow you with simplicity,
to reverence you with fear
and to love you with our whole heart;
that serving, following, reverencing and loving
we may behold you in the beauty of holiness
and rest in the presence of your glory,
now and forever. Amen.

Almighty and everlasting God,
who called your servant Ninian to preach the gospel
to the people of northern Britain:
raise up in this and every land
heralds and evangelists of your kingdom,
that your Church may make know the immeasurable riches
of your Son our Savior Jesus Christ,
who is alive and reigns with you,
in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and for ever. Amen.
       
Gathering our prayers and praises into one,
let us pray as our Savior has taught us.

- The Lord's Prayer

Grant us delight in the mercy that has found us
and bring all to rejoice at the feast of forgiveness. Amen.

*******************************************************
The psalms are from _Celebrating Common Prayer_ (Mowbray),
(c) The Society of Saint Francis 1992, which is used with permission.

The canticle is from _Common Worship: Daily Prayer, Preliminary Edition_,
copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2002.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The opening prayer of thanksgiving and the closing prayer use phrases from a
prayer in _Opening Prayers: Collects in Contemporary Language_.
Canterbury Press, Norwich, 1999.
 
The intercession is from _New Patterns for Worship_, copyright (c) The
Archbishops' Council, 2002.

The first collect is by Evelyn Underhill.

The second collect is from _Common Worship: Services and Prayers for
the Church of England_, material from which is included in this service is
copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2000.

Ninian is also called Nynia, Ninias, Rigna, Trignan, Ninnidh, Ringan, Ninus, or Dinan. He
was a Celt, born in southern Scotland in about 360, and is regarded as the first major
preacher of the Gospel to the people living in Britain north of the Wall--that is, living
outside the territory that had been under Roman rule. He is said to have studied in Rome
(note that he is contemporary with Ambrose, Jerome, and Augustine), but was chiefly
influenced by his friendship with Martin of Tours, with whom he spent some considerable
time when he was returning from Italy to Britain. It is probable that he named his
headquarters in Galloway after Martin's foundation in Gall. Martin had a monastery known
as LOCO TEIAC, a Latinized form of the Celtic LEUG TIGIAC. LEUG means "white,
shining," and TIG means "house" (a shanty, or SHAN-TIG, is an old house). The suffix
-AC means "little." Thus, Martin's monastery had a name which in Celtic means "little
white house." At about the time of Martin's death in 397, Ninian built a church at
Galloway, in southwest Scotland. It was built of stone and plastered white, an unusual
construction in a land where almost all buildings were wood. He called it Candida Casa
(White House) or Whithorn, presumably after Martin's foundation at Tours.
Archaeologists have excavated and partially restored his church in this century. From his
base at Galloway, Ninian preached throughout southern Scotland, south of the Grampian
Mountains, and conducted preaching missions among the Picts of Scotland, as far north as
the Moray Firth, He also preached in the Solway Plains and the Lake District of England.
Like Patrick (a generation later) and Columba (a century and a half later), he was a
principal agent in preserving the tradition of the old Romano-British Church and forming
the character of Celtic Christianity. Some historians think that the number and extent of
his conversions has been exaggerated, but throughout southern Scotland there are many
and widespread churches that bear his name, and have traditionally been assumed to be
congregations originally founded by him.
Our information about him comes chiefly from Bede's History (Book 3, chapter 4), an
anonymous eighth century account, and a 12th century account by Aelred. Aelred is
writing 700 years after the event, and is for that reason rejected as untrustworthy by many
critics. However, he claims to rely on an earlier account, "written by a barbarian." This
suggests that he may have had an authentic record by a member of Ninian's community in
Galloway. [James Kiefer]


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