OREMUS: 5 September 2006

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Mon Sep 4 21:13:19 GMT 2006


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OREMUS for Tuesday, September 5, 2006 
Mother Teresa of Calcutta, 1997

O Lord, open our lips.
And our mouth shall proclaim your praise.

Blessed are you, Almighty God, Father of all mercies,
we give you thanks for all your goodness and loving-kindness
to us and to all whom you have made.
We bless you for our creation, preservation,
and all the blessings of this life;
but above all for your immeasurable love
in the redemption of the world by our Lord Jesus Christ;
for the means of grace, and for the hope of glory.
For these and all your mercies, we praise you:
Father, Son, and Holy Spirit:
Blessed be God for ever.

An opening canticle may be sung. 

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Psalm 16

Protect me, O God, for I take refuge in you;*
 I have said to the Lord, 'You are my Lord,
   my good above all other.'
All my delight is upon the godly that are in the land,*
 upon those who are noble among the people.
But those who run after other gods*
 shall have their troubles multiplied.
Their libations of blood I will not offer,*
 nor take the names of their gods upon my lips.
O Lord, you are my portion and my cup;*
 it is you who uphold my lot.
My boundaries enclose a pleasant land;*
 indeed, I have a goodly heritage.
I will bless the Lord who gives me counsel;*
 my heart teaches me, night after night.
I have set the Lord always before me;*
 because he is at my right hand I shall not fall.
My heart, therefore, is glad and my spirit rejoices;*
 my body also shall rest in hope.
For you will not abandon me to the grave,*
 nor let your holy one see the Pit.
You will show me the path of life;*
 in your presence there is fullness of joy,
   and in your right hand are pleasures for evermore.

A Song of the Holy City (Revelation 21:1-5a)

I saw a new heaven and a new earth,
for the first heaven and the first earth had passed away
and the sea was no more.

And I saw the holy city, new Jerusalem,
coming down out of heaven from God,
prepared as a bride adorned for her husband.

And I heard a great voice from the throne saying,
'Behold, my dwelling is with my people.

'I will dwell with them and they shall be mine,
and I myself will be with them.

'I will wipe away every tear from their eyes,
and death shall be no more.

'Neither shall there be mourning,
nor crying, nor pain any more,
for the former things have passed away.'

And the One who sat upon the throne said,
'Behold, I make all things new.'

Psalm 150

Alleluia!
   Praise God in his holy temple;*
 praise him in the firmament of his power.
Praise him for his mighty acts;*
 praise him for his excellent greatness.
Praise him with the blast of the ram's-horn;*
 praise him with lyre and harp.
Praise him with timbrel and dance;*
 praise him with strings and pipe.
Praise him with resounding cymbals;*
 praise him with loud-clanging cymbals.
Let everything that has breath*
 praise the Lord.
   Alleluia!

FIRST READING [Song of Solomon 3:6-11]:

What is that coming up from the wilderness,
   like a column of smoke,
perfumed with myrrh and frankincense,
   with all the fragrant powders of the merchant? 
Look, it is the litter of Solomon!
Around it are sixty mighty men
   of the mighty men of Israel, 
all equipped with swords
   and expert in war,
each with his sword at his thigh
   because of alarms by night. 
King Solomon made himself a palanquin
   from the wood of Lebanon. 
He made its posts of silver,
   its back of gold, its seat of purple;
its interior was inlaid with love.
   Daughters of Jerusalem, 
   come out.
Look, O daughters of Zion,
   at King Solomon,
at the crown with which his mother crowned him
   on the day of his wedding,
   on the day of the gladness of his heart.

HYMN 
Words: Shirley Erena Murray, alt.  
Tune: Rhuddlan  
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God of freedom, God of justice,
God whose love is strong as death,
God who saw the dark of prison,
God who knew the price of faith:
touch our world of sad oppression
with your Spirit's healing breath.

Rid the earth of torture's terror,
God whose hands were nailed to wood;
hear the cries of pain and protest,
God who shed the tears and blood;
move in us the power of pity,
restless for the common good.

Make in us a captive conscience
quick to hear, to act, to plead;
make us truly sisters, brothers,
of whatever race or creed:
teach us to be fully human,
open to each other's need.

SECOND READING [1 Timothy 4:6-16]:

If you put these instructions before the brothers and sisters, you will be a good servant
of Christ Jesus, nourished on the words of the faith and of the sound teaching that you
have followed. Have nothing to do with profane myths and old wives' tales. Train
yourself in godliness, for, while physical training is of some value, godliness is valuable
in every way, holding promise for both the present life and the life to come. The saying
is sure and worthy of full acceptance. For to this end we toil and struggle, because we
have our hope set on the living God, who is the Saviour of all people, especially of
those who believe. 
These are the things you must insist on and teach. Let no one despise your youth, but
set the believers an example in speech and conduct, in love, in faith, in purity. Until I
arrive, give attention to the public reading of scripture, to exhorting, to teaching. Do
not neglect the gift that is in you, which was given to you through prophecy with the
laying on of hands by the council of elders. Put these things into practice, devote
yourself to them, so that all may see your progress. Pay close attention to yourself and
to your teaching; continue in these things, for in doing this you will save both yourself
and your hearers.

The Benedictus (Morning), 
the Magnificat (Evening), or 
Nunc dimittis (Night) may follow.

Prayer:
We seek you daily, O Father,
and you are there daily to be found.

Wherever we seek you,
at home, at work, on the highway,
you are there, O Lord.

Whatever we do,
eating and drinking,
writing or working,
readings, meditating or praying,
you are there, O Lord.

If we are oppressed,
you defend us, O Lord.

If we hunger,
you feed us, O Lord.

Whatever we need,
you give us, O Lord.

Make us worthy, Lord,
to serve our sisters and our brothers
throughout the world who live and die
in poverty and hunger.
Give them, through our hands,
this day their daily bread,
and by our understanding love,
give peace and joy. Amen.

God of compassion,
you regard the forsaken
and give hope to the crushed in spirit
give us grace like your servant Mother Teresa
to hear those who cry to you in distress,
that they may be joined to the company
of those who raise a song of thanksgiving
to your glory, O Father,
through the Son and in the Holy Spirit. Amen.
       
Gathering our prayers and praises into one,
let us pray as our Savior has taught us.

- The Lord's Prayer

Be a bright flame before us, O God,
and a guiding star above us.
Be a smooth path below us
and a kindly shepherd behind us,
today, tomorrow, and always. Amen.

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The psalms and the second collect are from _Celebrating Common Prayer_
(Mowbray), (c) The Society of Saint Francis 1992, which is used with permission.

The canticle is from _Common Worship: Daily Prayer, Preliminary Edition_,
copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2002.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The opening prayer of thanksgiving uses sentences from prayers in The Book of
Common Prayer According to the Use of The Episcopal Church_.

The intercession is by Stephen Benner and is based on a prayer by James Norden written
in 1548.

The first collect is by Mother Teresa and the closing sentence is by St Columba.



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