OREMUS: 6 October 2006

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Thu Oct 5 19:30:37 GMT 2006


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OREMUS for Friday, October 6, 2006 
William Tyndale, Translator of the Scriptures, Martyr, 1536

O Lord, open our lips.
And our mouth shall proclaim your praise.

Blessed are you, O God of justice,
you hear our cry and save us.
You call us to heed your word to the prophets,
you rouse us to the demand of the gospel
and impel us to carry it out.
For these and all your mercies, we praise you:
Father, Son, and Holy Spirit:
Blessed be God for ever.

An opening canticle may be sung. 

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Psalm 51

Have mercy on me, O God,
   according to your loving-kindness;*
 in your great compassion blot out my offences.
Wash me through and through from my wickedness*
 and cleanse me from my sin.
For I know my transgressions,*
 and my sin is ever before me.
Against you only have I sinned*
 and done what is evil in your sight.
And so you are justified when you speak*
 and upright in your judgement.
Indeed, I have been wicked from my birth,*
 a sinner from my mother's womb.
For behold, you look for truth deep within me,*
 and will make me understand wisdom secretly.
Purge me from my sin and I shall be pure;*
 wash me and I shall be clean indeed.
Make me hear of joy and gladness,*
 that the body you have broken may rejoice.
Hide your face from my sins*
 and blot out all my iniquities.
Create in me a clean heart, O God,*
 and renew a right spirit within me.
Cast me not away from your presence*
 and take not your holy Spirit from me.
Give me the joy of your saving help again*
 and sustain me with your bountiful Spirit.
I shall teach your ways to the wicked,*
 and sinners shall return to you.
Deliver me from death, O God,*
 and my tongue shall sing of your righteousness,
   O God of my salvation.
Open my lips, O Lord,*
 and my mouth shall proclaim your praise.
Had you desired it, I would have offered sacrifice,*
 but you take no delight in burnt-offerings.
The sacrifice of God is a troubled spirit;*
 a broken and contrite heart, O God, you will not despise.
Be favourable and gracious to Zion,*
 and rebuild the walls of Jerusalem.
Then you will be pleased with the appointed sacrifices,
   with burnt-offerings and oblations;*
 then shall they offer young bullocks upon your altar.

A Song of Faith (1 Peter 1.3-4,18-21)

Blessed be the God and Father
of our Lord Jesus Christ!

By his great mercy we have been born anew to a living hope
through the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead.

Into an inheritance that is imperishable, undefiled and unfading,
kept in heaven for you.

Who are being protected by the power of God
through faith for a salvation,
ready to be revealed in the last time.

You were ransomed from the futile ways of your ancestors
not with perishable things like silver or gold

But with the precious blood of Christ
like that of a lamb without spot or stain.

Through him you have confidence in God,
who raised him from the dead and gave him glory,
so that your faith and hope are set on God.

Psalm 147:1-12

Alleluia!
   How good it is to sing praises to our God!*
 how pleasant it is to honour him with praise!
The Lord rebuilds Jerusalem;*
 he gathers the exiles of Israel.
He heals the brokenhearted*
 and binds up their wounds.
He counts the number of the stars*
 and calls them all by their names.
Great is our Lord and mighty in power;*
 there is no limit to his wisdom.
The Lord lifts up the lowly,*
 but casts the wicked to the ground.
Sing to the Lord with thanksgiving;*
 make music to our God upon the harp.
He covers the heavens with clouds*
 and prepares rain for the earth;
He makes grass to grow upon the mountains*
 and green plants to serve us all.
He provides food for flocks and herds*
 and for the young ravens when they cry.
He is not impressed by the might of a horse,*
 he has no pleasure in human strength;
But the Lord has pleasure in those who fear him,*
 in those who await his gracious favour.
 Alleluia!

FIRST READING [Job 2:11-3:26]:

Now when Job's three friends heard of all these troubles
that had come upon him, each of them set out from his
home Eliphaz the Temanite, Bildad the Shuhite, and Zophar
the Naamathite. They met together to go and console and
comfort him. When they saw him from a distance, they did
not recognize him, and they raised their voices and wept
aloud; they tore their robes and threw dust in the air
upon their heads. They sat with him on the ground for
seven days and seven nights, and no one spoke a word to
him, for they saw that his suffering was very great.

After this Job opened his mouth and cursed the day of his
birth. Job said:
'Let the day perish on which I was born,
   and the night that said,
   "A man-child is conceived."
Let that day be darkness!
   May God above not seek it,
   or light shine on it.
Let gloom and deep darkness claim it.
   Let clouds settle upon it;
   let the blackness of the day terrify it.
That night let thick darkness seize it!
   let it not rejoice among the days of the year;
   let it not come into the number of the months.
Yes, let that night be barren;
   let no joyful cry be heard in it.
Let those curse it who curse the Sea,
   those who are skilled to rouse up Leviathan.
Let the stars of its dawn be dark;
   let it hope for light, but have none;
   may it not see the eyelids of the morning 
because it did not shut the doors of my mother's
womb,
   and hide trouble from my eyes.

'Why did I not die at birth,
   come forth from the womb and expire?
Why were there knees to receive me,
   or breasts for me to suck?
Now I would be lying down and quiet;
   I would be asleep; then I would be at rest
with kings and counsellors of the earth
   who rebuild ruins for themselves,
or with princes who have gold,
   who fill their houses with silver.
Or why was I not buried like a stillborn child,
   like an infant that never sees the light?
There the wicked cease from troubling,
   and there the weary are at rest.
There the prisoners are at ease together;
   they do not hear the voice of the taskmaster.
The small and the great are there,
   and the slaves are free from their masters.

'Why is light given to one in misery,
   and life to the bitter in soul,
who long for death, but it does not come,
   and dig for it more than for hidden treasures;
who rejoice exceedingly,
   and are glad when they find the grave?
Why is light given to one who cannot see the way,
   whom God has fenced in?
For my sighing comes like my bread,
   and my groanings are poured out like water.
Truly the thing that I fear comes upon me,
   and what I dread befalls me.
I am not at ease, nor am I quiet;
   I have no rest; but trouble comes.' 

HYMN 
Words: Henry Williams Baker, 1861
Tune: Ravenshaw

http://www.oremus.org/hymnal/l/l464.html
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Lord, thy Word abideth,
and our footsteps guideth;
who its truth believeth
light and joy receiveth.

When our foes are near us,
then thy Word doth cheer us,
Word of consolation,
message of salvation.

When the storms are o'er us,
and dark clouds before us,
then its light directeth,
and our way protecteth.

Who can tell the pleasure,
who recount the treasure,
by thy Word imparted
to the simple-hearted?

Word of mercy, giving
succor to the living;
word of life, supplying
comfort to the dying!

O that we, discerning,
its most holy learning,
Lord, may love and fear thee,
evermore be near thee!

SECOND READING [Galatians 3:23-29]:

Now before faith came, we were imprisoned and guarded under the law until faith
would be revealed. Therefore the law was our disciplinarian until Christ came, so that
we might be justified by faith. But now that faith has come, we are no longer subject
to a disciplinarian, for in Christ Jesus you are all children of God through faith. As
many of you as were baptized into Christ have clothed yourselves with Christ. There is
no longer Jew or Greek, there is no longer slave or free, there is no longer male and
female; for all of you are one in Christ Jesus. And if you belong to Christ, then you are
Abraham's offspring, heirs according to the promise.

The Benedictus (Morning), 
the Magnificat (Evening), or 
Nunc dimittis (Night) may follow.

Prayer:
Eternal God, we praise you for your mighty love given in
Christ's sacrifice on the cross, and the new life we have
received by his resurrection. Especially we thank you for
     the presence of Christ in our weakness and suffering...
                         (We thank you, Lord.)
     the ministry of Word and Sacrament...
     all who work to help and heal...
     sacrifices made to our benefit...
     opportunities for our generous giving...

God of grace, let our concern for others reflect Christ's
self-giving love, not only in our prayers, but also in
our practice. Especially we pray for
     those subjected to tyranny and oppression...
                         (Lord, hear our prayer.)
     wounded and injured people...
     those who face death...
     those who may be our enemies...
     the church in Latin America...

Set our hearts on fire with love for you, O God, 
that in its flame we may love you with all our hearts, 
with all our minds,
with all our souls, 
and with all our strength,
and our neighbors as ourselves;
and grant that in the keeping of your commandments
we may glorify you, the giver of all good gifts,
through Christ our Lord. Amen.

Lord, give to your people grace to hear and keep your word
that, after the example of your servant William Tyndale,
we may not only profess your gospel
but also be ready to suffer and die for it,
to the honour of your name;
through Jesus Christ your Son our Lord,
who is alive and reigns with you,
in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and for ever. Amen.
       
Gathering our prayers and praises into one,
let us pray as our Savior has taught us.

- The Lord's Prayer

Pour out your Spirit, O God, over all the world,
to inspire every heart with knowledge and love of you. Amen.

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The psalms are from _Celebrating Common Prayer_ (Mowbray),
(c) The Society of Saint Francis 1992, which is used with permission.

The canticle is from _Common Worship: Daily Prayer, Preliminary Edition_,
copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2002.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The opening prayer of thanksgiving and the closing prayer use phrases from a
prayer in _Opening Prayers: Collects in Contemporary Language_.
Canterbury Press, Norwich, 1999.
 
The second collect is from _Common Worship: Services and Prayers for
the Church of England_, material from which is included in this service is
copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2000.

William Tyndale was born about 1495 at Slymbridge near the Welsh border.
He received his degrees from Magdalen College, Oxford, and also studied at
Cambridge. He was ordained to the priesthood in 1521, and soon began to
speak of his desire, which eventually became his life's obsession, to translate
the Scriptures into English. It is reported that, in the course of a dispute with a
promminent clergyman who disparaged this proposal, he said, "If God spare
my life, ere many years I will cause a boy that driveth the plow to know more
of the Scriptures than thou dost." The remainder of his life was devoted to
keeping that vow, or boast. Finding that the King, Henry VIII, was firmly set
against any English version of the Scriptures, he fled to Germany (visiting
Martin Luther in 1525), and there travelled from city to city, in exile, poverty,
persecution, and constant danger. Tyndale understood the commonly received
doctrine -- the popular theology -- of his time to imply that men earn their
salvation by good behavior and by penance. He wrote eloquently in favor of
the view that salvation is a gift of God, freely bestowed, and not a response to
any good act on the part of the receiver. His views are expressed in numerous
pamphlets, and in the introductions to and commentaries on various books of
the Bible that accompanied his translations. He completed his translation of the
New Testament in 1525, and it was printed at Worms and smuggled into
England. Of 18,000 copies, only two survive. In 1534, he produced a revised
version, and began work on the Old Testament. In the next two years he
completed and published the Pentateuch and Jonah, and translated the books
from Joshua through Second Chronicles, but then he was captured (betrayed
by one he had befriended), tried for heresy, and put to death. He was burned at
the stake, but, as was often done, the officer strangled him before lighting the
fire. His last words were, "Lord, open the King of England's eyes."
Miles Coverdale continued Tyndale's work by translating those portions of the
Bible (including the Apocrypha) which Tyndale had not lived to translate
himself, and publishing the complete work. In 1537, the "Matthew Bible"
(essentially the Tyndale-Coverdale Bible under another man's name to spare
the government embarrassment) was published in England with the Royal
Permission. Six copies were set up for public reading in Old St. Paul's Church,
and throughout the daylight hours the church was crowded with those who had
come to hear it. One man would stand at the lectern and read until his voice
gave out, and then he would stand down and another would take his place. All
English translations of the Bible from that time to the present century are
essentially revisions of the Tyndale-Coverdale work. [James Kiefer,
abridged]



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