OREMUS: 20 November 2006

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Sun Nov 19 18:50:02 GMT 2006


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OREMUS for Monday, November 20, 2006 
Edmund, King of the East Angles, Martyr, 870

O Lord, open our lips.
And our mouth shall proclaim your praise.

Blessed are you, God our Father,
for you have enabled us to share 
in the inheritance of the saints in the light. 
You have rescued us from the power of darkness 
and transferred us into the kingdom of your beloved Son, 
in whom we have redemption and the forgiveness of sins. 
He is the image of the invisible God, the firstborn of all creation; 
for in him all things in heaven and on earth were created.
He himself is before all things, and in him all things hold together. 
For these and all your mercies, we praise you:
Father, Son, and Holy Spirit,
Blessed be God for ever!

An opening canticle may be sung. 

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Psalm 70

Be pleased, O God, to deliver me;*
 O Lord, make haste to help me.
Let those who seek my life
   be ashamed and altogether dismayed;*
 let those who take pleasure in my misfortune
   draw back and be disgraced.
Let those who say to me 'Aha!'
   and gloat over me turn back,*
 because they are ashamed.
Let all who seek you rejoice and be glad in you;*
 let those who love your salvation say for ever,
   'Great is the Lord!'
But as for me, I am poor and needy;*
 come to me speedily, O God.
You are my helper and my deliverer;*
 O Lord, do not tarry.

Psalm 75

We give you thanks, O God, we give you thanks,*
 calling upon your name
   and declaring all your wonderful deeds.
'I will appoint a time,' says God;*
 'I will judge with equity.
'Though the earth and all its inhabitants are quaking,*
 I will make its pillars fast.
'I will say to the boasters, "Boast no more",*
 and to the wicked, "Do not toss your horns;
'"Do not toss your horns so high,*
 nor speak with a proud neck."'
For judgement is neither from the east
   nor from the west,*
 nor yet from the wilderness or the mountains.
It is God who judges;*
 he puts down one and lifts up another.
For in the Lord's hand there is a cup,
   full of spiced and foaming wine, which he pours out,*
 and all the wicked of the earth
   shall drink and drain the dregs.
But I will rejoice for ever;*
 I will sing praises to the God of Jacob.
He shall break off all the horns of the wicked;*
 but the horns of the righteous shall be exalted.

A Song of Wisdom (Wisdom 9.1-5a,5c-6,9-11)

O God of our ancestors and Lord of mercy,
you have made all things by your word.

By your wisdom you have formed us
to have dominion over the creatures you have made;

To rule the world in holiness and righteousness
and to pronounce judgement in uprightness of soul.

Give us the Wisdom that sits by your throne;
do not reject us from among your servants,

For we are your servants,
with little understanding of judgement and laws.

Even one who is perfect among us
will be regarded as nothing
without the wisdom that comes from you.

With you is Wisdom, she who knows your works,
and was present when you made the world.

She understands what is pleasing in your sight
and what is right according to your commandments.

Send her forth from the holy heavens,
from the throne of your glory send her.

That she may labour at our side
and that we may learn what is pleasing to you.

For she knows and understands all things,
she will guide us wisely in our actions
and guard us with her glory.

Psalm 150

Alleluia!
   Praise God in his holy temple;*
 praise him in the firmament of his power.
Praise him for his mighty acts;*
 praise him for his excellent greatness.
Praise him with the blast of the ram's-horn;*
 praise him with lyre and harp.
Praise him with timbrel and dance;*
 praise him with strings and pipe.
Praise him with resounding cymbals;*
 praise him with loud-clanging cymbals.
Let everything that has breath*
 praise the Lord.
   Alleluia!

FIRST READING [Deuteronomy 26:5-10]:

You shall make this response before the Lord your God: 'A
wandering Aramean was my ancestor; he went down into
Egypt and lived there as an alien, few in number, and
there he became a great nation, mighty and populous. When
the Egyptians treated us harshly and afflicted us, by
imposing hard labour on us, we cried to the Lord, the God
of our ancestors; the Lord heard our voice and saw our
affliction, our toil, and our oppression. The Lord
brought us out of Egypt with a mighty hand and an
outstretched arm, with a terrifying display of power, and
with signs and wonders; and he brought us into this place
and gave us this land, a land flowing with milk and
honey. So now I bring the first of the fruit of the
ground that you, O Lord, have given me.' You shall set it
down before the Lord your God and bow down before the
Lord your God.

HYMN 
Words: Bernard of Clairvaux, twelfth century;
trans. Edward Caswall, 1849
Tune: King's Norton, St. Botolph, St. Agnes, Dalehurst, Redhead

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O Jesus, King most wonderful,
thou Conqueror renowned,
thou sweetness most ineffable,
in whom all joys are found.

When once thou visitest the heart,
then truth begins to shine,
then earthly vanities depart,
then kindles love divine.

O Jesus, Light of all below,
thou Fount of life and fire,
surpassing all the joys we know,
and all we can desire;

May every heart confess thy Name;
thy wondrous love adore,
and seeking thee, their hearts inflame
to seek thee more and more.

Thee, Jesus, may our voices bless,
thee may we love alone;
and ever in our lives express
the image of thine own.

SECOND READING [Hebrews 10:32-39]:

But recall those earlier days when, after you had been enlightened, you endured a hard
struggle with sufferings, sometimes being publicly exposed to abuse and persecution,
and sometimes being partners with those so treated. For you had compassion for those
who were in prison, and you cheerfully accepted the plundering of your possessions,
knowing that you yourselves possessed something better and more lasting. Do not,
therefore, abandon that confidence of yours; it brings a great reward. For you need
endurance, so that when you have done the will of God, you may receive what was
promised. For yet
'in a very little while,
   the one who is coming will come and will not delay;
but my righteous one will live by faith.
   My soul takes no pleasure in anyone who shrinks back.'
But we are not among those who shrink back and so are lost, but among those who
have faith and so are saved.

The Benedictus (Morning), 
the Magnificat (Evening), or 
Nunc dimittis (Night) may follow.

Prayer:
Watchful at all times,
let us pray for strength to stand with confidence
before our Maker and Redeemer.

That God may bring in his kingdom with judgement and mercy,
let us pray to the Lord:
Come in your might, Lord Jesus.

That God may establish among the nations
his sceptre of righteousness, let us pray to the Lord: 
Come in your might, Lord Jesus.

That the Church, may seek him in the scriptures
and recognise him in the breaking of the bread,
let us pray to the Lord:
Come in your might, Lord Jesus.

That God may bind up the broken-hearted,
restore the sick and raise up all who have fallen,
let us pray to the Lord:
Come in your might, Lord Jesus.

That the light of God's coming may dawn
on all who live in darkness and in the shadow of death,
let us pray to the Lord:
Come in your might, Lord Jesus.

That with all the saints in light,
we may shine forth as lights of the world,
let us pray to the Lord:
Come in your might, Lord Jesus.

So we commend ourselves and all for whom we pray
to the mercy and protection of our heavenly Father:

Judge of all the earth,
restrain the ambitions of the proud
and the turmoil of the nations;
establish among us the reign of the Messiah,
who drained for us the cup of judgement
and is alive with you and the Holy Spirit,
one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

Eternal God,
whose servant Edmund kept faith to the end,
both with you and with his people,
and glorified you by his death:
grant us such steadfastness of faith
that, with the noble army of martyrs,
we may come to enjoy the fullness of the resurrection life;
through Jesus Christ your Son our Lord,
who is alive and reigns with you,
in the unity of the Holy Spirit, 
one God, now and for ever. Amen.
       
Uniting our prayers with the whole company of heaven,
let us pray as our Savior has taught us.

- The Lord's Prayer

Awaken us to the power and gifts
you pour into us and make us worthy of your trust,
working abundantly to build your kingdom. Amen.

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The psalms are from _Celebrating Common Prayer_ (Mowbray),
(c) The Society of Saint Francis 1992, which is used with permission.

The canticle is from _Common Worship: Daily Prayer, Preliminary Edition_,
copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2002.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The opening prayer of thanksgiving is adapted from Colossians 1:12-17
[NRSV]

The closing sentence is adapted from a prayer reprinted from _Revised
Common Lectionary Prayers_, copyright (c) 2002 Consultation on
Common Texts

The second collect is from _Common Worship: Services and Prayers for
the Church of England_, material from which is included in this service is
copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2000.

When the heathen Anglo-Saxons invaded Christian Britain in the 400's, they
eventually established seven kingdoms: Essex, Wessex, Sussex (East Saxons,
West Saxons, and South Saxons), Mercia, Northumbria, and East Anglia (three
kingdoms of the Angles), and the Jute kingdom of Kent. (The borders between
these ancient kingdoms are still borders between regions speaking English with
different accents today.) Under the influence of missionaries from the Celts and
from continental Europe, these peoples bcame Christian, only to be faced
themselves by a wave of heathen invaders.
Edmund was born about 840, became King of East Anglia in about 855, and in
870 faced a horde of marauding Danes, who moved through the countryside,
burning churches and slaughtering villages wholesale. On reaching East Anglia,
their leaders confronted Edmund and offered him peace on condition that he
would rule as their vassal and forbid the practice of the Christian faith. Edmund
refused this last condition, fought, and was captured. He was ill-treated and
killed. His burial place is the town of Bury St. Edmunds.



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