OREMUS: 24 July 2006

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Sun Jul 23 18:45:59 GMT 2006


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OREMUS for Monday, July 24, 2006 
Thomas a Kempis, Priest, 1471

O Lord, open our lips.
And our mouth shall proclaim your praise.

Blessed are you, provident Father;
with the prayer your Son taught us always on our lips,
we ask, we seek, we knock at your door.
For these and all your mercies, we praise you:
Father, Son, and Holy Spirit:
Blessed be God for ever.>

An opening canticle may be sung. 

http://www.oremus.org/ocan.html

Psalm 80

Hear, O Shepherd of Israel, leading Joseph like a flock;*
 shine forth, you that are enthroned upon the cherubim.
In the presence of Ephraim, Benjamin and Manasseh,*
 stir up your strength and come to help us.
Restore us, O God of hosts;*
 show the light of your countenance
   and we shall be saved.
O Lord God of hosts,*
 how long will you be angered
   despite the prayers of your people?
You have fed them with the bread of tears;*
 you have given them bowls of tears to drink.
You have made us the derision of our neighbours,*
 and our enemies laugh us to scorn.
Restore us, O God of hosts;*
 show the light of your countenance
   and we shall be saved.
You have brought a vine out of Egypt;*
 you cast out the nations and planted it.
You prepared the ground for it;*
 it took root and filled the land.
The mountains were covered by its shadow*
 and the towering cedar trees by its boughs.
You stretched out its tendrils to the Sea*
 and its branches to the River.
Why have you broken down its wall,*
 so that all who pass by pluck off its grapes?
The wild boar of the forest has ravaged it,*
 and the beasts of the field have grazed upon it.
Turn now, O God of hosts, look down from heaven;
   behold and tend this vine;*
 preserve what your right hand has planted.
They burn it with fire like rubbish;*
 at the rebuke of your countenance let them perish.
Let your hand be upon the man of your right hand,*
 the son of man you have made so strong for yourself.
And so will we never turn away from you;*
 give us life, that we may call upon your name.
Restore us, O Lord God of hosts;*
 show the light of your countenance
   and we shall be saved.

A Song of God's Children (Romans 8:2,14,15b-19)

The law of the Spirit of life in Christ Jesus
has set us free from the law of sin and death.

All who are led by the Spirit of God are children of God;
for we have received the Spirit that enables us to cry, 'Abba, Father'.

The Spirit himself bears witness that we are children of God
and if God's children, then heirs of God;

If heirs of God, then fellow-heirs with Christ;
since we suffer with him now, that we may be glorified with him.

These sufferings that we now endure
are not worth comparing to the glory that shall be revealed.

For the creation waits with eager longing   
for the revealing of the children of God.

Psalm 150

Alleluia!
   Praise God in his holy temple;*
 praise him in the firmament of his power.
Praise him for his mighty acts;*
 praise him for his excellent greatness.
Praise him with the blast of the ram's-horn;*
 praise him with lyre and harp.
Praise him with timbrel and dance;*
 praise him with strings and pipe.
Praise him with resounding cymbals;*
 praise him with loud-clanging cymbals.
Let everything that has breath*
 praise the Lord.
   Alleluia!

READING [Luke 4:1-13]:

Jesus, full of the Holy Spirit, returned from the Jordan
and was led by the Spirit in the wilderness, where for
forty days he was tempted by the devil. He ate nothing at
all during those days, and when they were over, he was
famished. The devil said to him, 'If you are the Son of
God, command this stone to become a loaf of bread.' Jesus
answered him, 'It is written, "One does not live by bread
alone." '

Then the devil led him up and showed him in an instant
all the kingdoms of the world. And the devil said to him,
'To you I will give their glory and all this authority;
for it has been given over to me, and I give it to anyone
I please. If you, then, will worship me, it will all be
yours.' Jesus answered him, 'It is written,
"Worship the Lord your God,
   and serve only him." '

Then the devil took him to Jerusalem, and placed him on
the pinnacle of the temple, saying to him, 'If you are
the Son of God, throw yourself down from here, for it is
written,
"He will command his angels concerning you,
   to protect you",
and
"On their hands they will bear you up,
   so that you will not dash your foot against a stone."
'
Jesus answered him, 'It is said, "Do not put the Lord
your God to the test." ' When the devil had finished
every test, he departed from him until an opportune time. 

For another Biblical reading,
Tobit 1

HYMN 
Words:  attributed to Thomas … Kempis (1379-1471);
trans. John Mason Neale
Tune: Lewes     
http://www.oremus.org/hymnal/i/i199.html
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If there be that skills to reckon
all the number of the blest,
he perchance can weigh the gladness
of the everlasting rest,
which, their earthly exile finished,
they by merit have possessed.

Through the vale of lamentation
happily and safely past,
now the years of their affliction
in their memory they recast,
and the end of all perfection
they can contemplate at last.

There the gifts of each and single
all in common right possess;
there each member hath his portion
in the Body's blessedness;
so that he, the least in merits,
share the guerdon none the less.

In a glass through types and riddles
dwelling here, we see alone;
then serenely, purely, clearly,
we shall know as we are known,
fixing our enlightened vision
on the glory of the throne.

There the Trinity of persons
unbeclouded shall we see;
there the Unity of essence
perfectly revealed shall be;
while we hail the threefold Godhead
and the simple Unity.

Wherefore man, take heart and courage,
whatso'er thy present pain;
such untold reward through suffering
thou may'st merit to attain:
and for ever in his glory
with the Light of light to reign.

The Benedictus (Morning), the 
Magnificat (Evening), or 
Nunc dimittis (Night) may follow.

Prayer:
We praise you, God our creator, for your handiwork in
shaping and sustaining your wondrous creation. Especially
we thank you for
     the miracle of life and the wonder of living...
                         (We thank you, Lord.)
     particular blessings coming to us in this day...
     the resources of the earth...
     gifts of creative vision and skillful craft...
     the treasure stored in every human life...

We dare to pray for others, God our Savior, claiming your
love in Jesus Christ for the whole world, committing
ourselves to care for those around us in his name.
Especially we pray for
     those who work for the benefit of others... 
                         (Lord, hear our prayer.)
     those who cannot work today...
     those who teach and those who learn...
     people who are poor...
     the Church in Europe... 

Loving God, our Father,
you gave your Son Jesus
to be knitted and fastened to our souls
by good will and a great desire for him:
Grant us that Spirit
which opens the eyes of our mind
to that spiritual knowledge of you.
We ask this through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Holy God, 
you have nourished and strengthened your Church 
by the inspired writings 
of your servant Thomas   Kempis: 
Grant that we may learn from him 
to know what is necessary to be known, 
to love what is to be loved, 
to praise what highly pleases you, 
and always to seek to know and follow your will;
through Jesus Christ our Lord,
who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and for ever. Amen. 
       
Gathering our prayers and praises into one,
let us pray as our Savior has taught us.

- The Lord's Prayer

Out of your never-failing abundance,
satisfy the hungers of body and soul
and lead all peoples of the earth
to the feast of the world to come. Amen.

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The psalms are from _Celebrating Common Prayer_ (Mowbray),
(c) The Society of Saint Francis 1992, which is used with permission.

The canticle is from _Common Worship: Daily Prayer, Preliminary Edition_,
copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2002.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The opening prayer of thanksgiving and the closing prayer use sentences from 
prayers in _Opening Prayers: Collects in Contemporary Language_.
Canterbury Press, Norwich, 1999.

The intercession is from _Book of Common Worship_, 
(c) 1993 Westminster / John Knox Press. 

The second collect is from _The Proper for the Lesser Feasts and
Fasts_, 3rd edition, (c) 1980 The Church Pension Fund.

Thomas Hammerken (or Hammerlein -- both mean "little hammer") was born
at Kempen (hence the "A Kempis") in the duchy of Cleves in Germany around
1380. He was educated by a religious order called the Brethren of the
Common Life, and in due course joined the order, was ordained a priest,
became sub-prior of his house (in the low Countries), and died 25 July 1471
(his feast is observed a day early to avoid conflict with that of James
bar-Zebedee the Apostle).
Thomas is known almost entirely for composing or compiling a manual of
spiritual advice known as The Imitation of Christ, in which he urges the reader
to seek to follow the example of Jesus Christ and to be conformed in all things
to His will. An extract follows:
When God bestows Spiritual comfort, receive it with a grateful heart; but
remember that it comes of God's free gift, and not of your own merit. Do not
be proud, nor over joyful, nor foolishly presumptuous; rather, be the more
humble for this gift, more cautious, and more prudent in all your doings, for
this hour will pass, and temptation will follow it. When comfort is withdrawn,
do not immediately despair, but humbly and patiently await the will of Heaven;
for God is able to restore you to a consolation even richer than before. This is
nothing new or strange to those who know the ways of God, for the great
Saints and Prophets of old often experienced these changes. ...Indeed, the
temptation that precedes is often a sign of comfort to follow. For heavenly
comfort is promised to those who have been tried and tempted."To him who
overcomes," says God, "I will give to eat of the Tree of Life." [James
Kiefer]
The Imitation of Christ can be read at 

www.ccel.org/k/kempis/imitation/imitation.html


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