OREMUS: 31 August 2006

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Wed Aug 30 17:00:01 GMT 2006


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OREMUS for Thursday, August 31, 2006 
Aidan, Bishop of Lindisfarne, Missionary, 651

O Lord, open our lips.
And our mouth shall proclaim your praise.

Blessed are you, Holy God,
you liberate the oppressed
and make a way of salvation.
You call us to unite ourselves with all who cry for justice,
and lead us together into freedom
through our Lord and Liberator,
Jesus Christ.
For these and all your mercies, we praise you:
Father, Son, and Holy Spirit:
Blessed be God for ever.

An opening canticle may be sung. 

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Psalm 107

Give thanks to the Lord, for he is good,*
 and his mercy endures for ever.
Let all those whom the Lord has redeemed proclaim*
 that he redeemed them from the hand of the foe.
He gathered them out of the lands;*
 from the east and from the west,
   from the north and from the south.
Some wandered in desert wastes;*
 they found no way to a city where they might dwell.
They were hungry and thirsty;*
 their spirits languished within them.
Then they cried to the Lord in their trouble,*
 and he delivered them from their distress.
He put their feet on a straight path*
 to go to a city where they might dwell.
Let them give thanks to the Lord for his mercy*
 and the wonders he does for his children.
For he satisfies the thirsty*
 and fills the hungry with good things.
Some sat in darkness and deep gloom,*
 bound fast in misery and iron;
Because they rebelled against the words of God*
 and despised the counsel of the Most High.
So he humbled their spirits with hard labour;*
 they stumbled and there was none to help.
Then they cried to the Lord in their trouble,*
 and he delivered them from their distress.
He led them out of darkness and deep gloom*
 and broke their bonds asunder.
Let them give thanks to the Lord for his mercy*
 and the wonders he does for his children.
For he shatters the doors of bronze*
 and breaks in two the iron bars.
Some were fools and took to rebellious ways;*
 they were afflicted because of their sins.
They abhorred all manner of food*
 and drew near to death's door.
Then they cried to the Lord in their trouble,*
 and he delivered them from their distress.
He sent forth his word and healed them*
 and saved them from the grave.
Let them give thanks to the Lord for his mercy*
 and the wonders he does for his children.
Let them offer a sacrifice of thanksgiving*
 and tell of his acts with shouts of joy.
Some went down to the sea in ships*
 and plied their trade in deep waters;
They beheld the works of the Lord*
 and his wonders in the deep.
Then he spoke and a stormy wind arose,*
 which tossed high the waves of the sea.
They mounted up to the heavens
   and fell back to the depths;*
 their hearts melted because of their peril.
They reeled and staggered like drunkards*
 and were at their wits' end.
Then they cried to the Lord in their trouble,*
 and he delivered them from their distress.
He stilled the storm to a whisper*
 and quieted the waves of the sea.
Then were they glad because of the calm,*
 and he brought them
   to the harbour they were bound for.
Let them give thanks to the Lord for his mercy*
 and the wonders he does for his children.
Let them exalt him in the congregation of the people*
 and praise him in the council of the elders.
The Lord changed rivers into deserts,*
 and water-springs into thirsty ground,
A fruitful land into salt flats,*
 because of the wickedness of those who dwell there.
He changed deserts into pools of water*
 and dry land into water-springs.
He settled the hungry there,*
 and they founded a city to dwell in.
They sowed fields and planted vineyards,*
 and brought in a fruitful harvest.
He blessed them, so that they increased greatly;*
 he did not let their herds decrease.
Yet when they were diminished and brought low,*
 through stress of adversity and sorrow,
He lifted up the poor out of misery*
 and multiplied their families like flocks of sheep.
He pours contempt on princes*
 and makes them wander in trackless wastes.
The upright will see this and rejoice,*
 but all wickedness will shut its mouth.
Whoever is wise will ponder these things,*
 and consider well the mercies of the Lord.

A Song of the Covenant (Isaiah 42:5-8a)

Thus says God, who created the heavens,
who fashioned the earth and all that dwells in it;

Who gives breath to the people upon it,
and spirit to those who walk in it,

'I am the Lord and I have called you in righteousness,
I have taken you by the hand and kept you;

'I have given you as a covenant to the people,
a light to the nations, to open the eyes that are blind.

'To bring out the captives from the dungeon,
from the prison, those who sit in darkness.

'I am the Lord, that is my name;
my glory I give to no other.'

Psalm 148

Alleluia!
   Praise the Lord from the heavens;*
 praise him in the heights.
Praise him, all you angels of his;*
 praise him, all his host.
Praise him, sun and moon;*
 praise him, all you shining stars.
Praise him, heaven of heavens,*
 and you waters above the heavens.
Let them praise the name of the Lord;*
 for he commanded and they were created.
He made them stand fast for ever and ever;*
 he gave them a law which shall not pass away.
Praise the Lord from the earth,*
 you sea-monsters and all deeps;
Fire and hail, snow and fog,*
 tempestuous wind, doing his will;
Mountains and all hills,*
 fruit trees and all cedars;
Wild beasts and all cattle,*
 creeping things and winged birds;
Kings of the earth and all peoples,*
 princes and all rulers of the world;
Young men and maidens,*
 old and young together.
Let them praise the name of the Lord,*
 for his name only is exalted,
   his splendour is over earth and heaven.
He has raised up strength for his people
   and praise for all his loyal servants,*
 the children of Israel, a people who are near him.
   Alleluia!

FIRST READING [Song of Solomon 1:1-17]:

The Song of Songs, which is Solomon's. 

Let him kiss me with the kisses of his mouth!
For your love is better than wine, 
   your anointing oils are fragrant,
your name is perfume poured out;
   therefore the maidens love you. 
Draw me after you, let us make haste.
   The king has brought me into his chambers.
We will exult and rejoice in you;
   we will extol your love more than wine;
   rightly do they love you. 

I am black and beautiful,
   O daughters of Jerusalem,
like the tents of Kedar,
   like the curtains of Solomon. 
Do not gaze at me because I am dark,
   because the sun has gazed on me.
My mother's sons were angry with me;
   they made me keeper of the vineyards,
   but my own vineyard I have not kept! 
Tell me, you whom my soul loves,
   where you pasture your flock,
   where you make it lie down at noon;
for why should I be like one who is veiled
   beside the flocks of your companions? 

If you do not know,
   O fairest among women,
follow the tracks of the flock,
   and pasture your kids
   beside the shepherds' tents. 

I compare you, my love,
   to a mare among Pharaoh's chariots. 
Your cheeks are comely with ornaments,
   your neck with strings of jewels. 
We will make you ornaments of gold,
   studded with silver. 

While the king was on his couch,
   my nard gave forth its fragrance. 
My beloved is to me a bag of myrrh
   that lies between my breasts. 
My beloved is to me a cluster of henna blossoms
   in the vineyards of En-gedi. 

Ah, you are beautiful, my love;
   ah, you are beautiful;
   your eyes are doves. 
Ah, you are beautiful, my beloved,
   truly lovely.
Our couch is green; 
   the beams of our house are cedar,
   our rafters are pine.

HYMN 
Words: John Newton (1725-1807), 1779
Tune: St. Peter, St. Botolph

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How sweet the Name of Jesus sounds
in a believer's ear!
It soothes his sorrows, heals his wounds,
and drives away his fear.

It makes the wounded spirit whole,
and calms the troubled breast;
'tis manna to the hungry soul,
and to the weary, rest.

Dear Name, the rock on which I build,
my shield and hiding-place,
my never-failing treasury, filled 
with boundless stores of grace!

Jesus! my Shepherd, Brother, Friend,
my Prophet, Priest and King,
my Lord, my Life, my Way, my End,
accept the praise I bring.

Weak is the effort of my heart,
and cold my warmest thought;
but when I see thee as thou art,
I'll praise thee as I ought.

Till then I would thy love proclaim
with every fleeting breath;
and may the music of thy Name
refresh my soul in death!

SECOND READING [James 1:1-8]:

James, a servant of God and of the Lord Jesus Christ,
To the twelve tribes in the Dispersion:
Greetings. 
My brothers and sisters, whenever you face trials of any kind, consider it nothing but
joy, because you know that the testing of your faith produces endurance; and let
endurance have its full effect, so that you may be mature and complete, lacking in
nothing. 
If any of you is lacking in wisdom, ask God, who gives to all generously and
ungrudgingly, and it will be given you. But ask in faith, never doubting, for the one
who doubts is like a wave of the sea, driven and tossed by the wind; for the doubter,
being double-minded and unstable in every way, must not expect to receive anything
from the Lord.

The Benedictus (Morning), 
the Magnificat (Evening), or 
Nunc dimittis (Night) may follow.

Prayer:
God of the apostles and martyrs,
we thank you for the hope that is from the beginning.
We bless you for the good news of Jesus
crucified, risen, and interceding for us
until his coming again in glory.

We commend to your care
all who walk and weep in grief and regret.

We pray in hope of your mercy.

We commend to you
all who live far from your image.
We pray in hope of your salvation.

We commend Holy Church,
We pray in hope of your glory.

We commend to your justice all peoples
who participate in oppression, strife and domination of others.
We pray in hope of your justice and peace.

We commend to you all who have died.
We pray in hope of your resurrection.

We commend to you our unfinished business.
We pray in hope of rest in you.

Give to us, O Lord,
the peace of those who have learned to serve you,
the peace of those who are glad to obey you,
and the peace of those who rejoice in your praise,
through Christ our Lord. Amen.

Everlasting God, 
you sent the gentle bishop Aidan 
to proclaim the gospel in England: 
grant us to live as he taught
in simplicity, humility and love for the poor;
through Jesus Christ your Son our Lord,
who is alive and reigns with you,
in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and for ever. Amen.
       
Gathering our prayers and praises into one,
let us pray as our Savior has taught us.

- The Lord's Prayer

May the mind that was in Christ possess us,
the love that is always at the heart of God enlarge us,
and the joy of the Spirit give us kindly eyes and thankful soul.
Amen.

*******************************************************
The psalms are from _Celebrating Common Prayer_ (Mowbray),
(c) The Society of Saint Francis 1992, which is used with permission.

The canticle is from _Common Worship: Daily Prayer, Preliminary Edition_,
copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2002.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The opening prayer of thanksgiving is based on a prayer from _Common Worship:
Services and Prayers for the Church of England_, material from which is included in
this service is copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2000.

The first collect is by Saint Aidan and the closing sentence is by Bruce Prewer.

The intercession is reprinted from _THE DAILY OFFICE: A Book of
Hours of Daily Prayer after the Use of the Order of Saint Luke_, (c)
1997 by The Order of Saint Luke. Used by permission.

The second collect is from _Common Worship: Services and Prayers for
the Church of England_, material from which is included in this service is
copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2000.

 The Gospel first came to the northern English in 627, When King Edwin of
Northumbria was converted by a mission from Canterbury led by Bishop
Paulinus, who established his see at York. Edwin's death in battle in 632 was
followed by a severe pagan reaction. A year later, Edwin's exiled nephew
Oswald gained the kingdom, and proceeded at once to restore the Christian
mission.
During his exile, Oswald had lived at Columba's monastery of Iona (see 9
June), where he had been converted and baptized. Hence he sent to Iona,
rather than to Canterbury, for missionaries. The first monk to preach was a
man named Corman, who had no success, and returned to Iona to complain
that the Northumbrians were a savage and unteachable race. A young monk
named Aidan responded, "Perhaps you were too harsh with them, and they
might have responded better to a gentler approach." At this, Aidan found
himself appointed to lead a second expedition to Northumbria. He centered his
work, not at York, but in imitation of his home monastery, on Lindisfarne, an
island off the northeast coast of England, now often called Holy Isle.
With his fellow monks and the English youths whom he trained, Aidan restored
Christianity in Northumbria, King Oswald often serving as his interpreter, and
extended the mission through the midlands as far south as London.
Aidan died at the royal town of Bamborough, 31 August, 651. The historian
Bede said of him: "He neither sought nor loved anything of this world, but
delighted in distributing immediately to the poor whatever was given him by
kings or rich men of the world. He traversed both town and country on foot,
never on horseback, unless compelled by some urgent necessity. Wherever on
his way he saw any, either rich or poor, he invited them, if pagans, to embrace
the mystery of the faith; or if they were believers, he sought to strengthen them
in their faith and stir them up by words and actions to alms and good works."
[James Kiefer]



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