OREMUS: 17 October 2005

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Sun Oct 16 21:38:52 GMT 2005


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OREMUS for Monday, October 17, 2005 
Ignatius, Bishop of Antioch, Martyr, c.107

O Lord, open our lips.
And our mouth shall proclaim your praise.

Blessed are you, tireless Guardian of your people,
you are always ready to hear the cry of your chosen ones;
you teach us to rely day and night on your care.
You impel us to seek your enduring justice
and your ever-present help
revealed in your Son, Jesus Christ our Lord.
For these and all your mercies, we praise you:
Father, Son, and Holy Spirit:
Blessed be God for ever.

An opening canticle may be sung. 

http://www.oremus.org/ocan.html

Psalm 110:1-5

The Lord said to my lord, 'Sit at my right hand,*
 until I make your enemies your footstool.'
The Lord will send the sceptre of your power
   out of Zion,*
 saying, 'Rule over your enemies round about you.
'Princely state has been yours
   from the day of your birth,*
 in the beauty of holiness have I begotten you,
   like dew from the womb of the morning.'
The Lord has sworn and he will not recant:*
 'You are a priest for ever after the order of Melchizedek.'

Psalm 111

Alleluia!
   I will give thanks to the Lord with my whole heart,*
 in the assembly of the upright, in the congregation.
Great are the deeds of the Lord!*
 they are studied by all who delight in them.
His work is full of majesty and splendour,*
 and his righteousness endures for ever.
He makes his marvellous works to be remembered;*
 the Lord is gracious and full of compassion.
He gives food to those who fear him;*
 he is ever mindful of his covenant.
He has shown his people the power of his works*
 in giving them the lands of the nations.
The works of his hands are faithfulness and justice;*
 all his commandments are sure.
They stand fast for ever and ever,*
 because they are done in truth and equity.
He sent redemption to his people;
   he commanded his covenant for ever;*
 holy and awesome is his name.
The fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom;*
 those who act accordingly have a good understanding;
   his praise endures for ever.

A Song of Deliverance (Isaiah 12:2-6)

'Behold, God is my salvation;
I will trust and will not be afraid;

'For the Lord God is my strength and my song,
and has become my salvation.'

With joy you will draw water
from the wells of salvation.

On that day you will say,
'Give thanks to the Lord, call upon his name;

'Make known his deeds among the nations,
proclaim that his name is exalted.

'Sing God's praises, who has triumphed gloriously;
let this be known in all the world.

'Shout and sing for joy, you that dwell in Zion,
for great in your midst is the Holy One of Israel.'

Psalm 150

Alleluia!
   Praise God in his holy temple;*
 praise him in the firmament of his power.
Praise him for his mighty acts;*
 praise him for his excellent greatness.
Praise him with the blast of the ram's-horn;*
 praise him with lyre and harp.
Praise him with timbrel and dance;*
 praise him with strings and pipe.
Praise him with resounding cymbals;*
 praise him with loud-clanging cymbals.
Let everything that has breath*
 praise the Lord.
   Alleluia!

READING [Mark 13:32-37]:

Jesus said, 'But about that day or hour no one knows,
neither the angels in heaven, nor the Son, but only the
Father. Beware, keep alert; for you do not know when the
time will come. It is like a man going on a journey, when
he leaves home and puts his slaves in charge, each with
his work, and commands the doorkeeper to be on the watch.
Therefore, keep awake for you do not know when the master
of the house will come, in the evening, or at midnight,
or at cockcrow, or at dawn, or else he may find you
asleep when he comes suddenly. And what I say to you I
say to all: Keep awake.'

For another Biblical reading,
Deuteronomy 12:1-14

HYMN 
Words: J.R. Peacey (1896-1971) (c)
Tune: Deus tuorum militum, Church Triumphant  
http://www.oremus.org/hymnal/a/a401.html
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Awake! Awake! Fling off the night,
for God has sent a glorious light,
and we who live in Christ's new day
must works of darkness put away.

Awake and sing, with praises strong,
in psalm and hymn and spirit-song.
Let love our words and works renew
with all that's good and right and true.

Let in the light; all sin expose
to Christ, whose life no darkness knows.
Before the cross expectant kneel,
that Christ may judge, and judging, heal.

Then rise as children of the light.
Be neither proud, nor hide from sight.
Be careful how you live, and wise
to sift the truth from cunning lies.

Through Christ give thanks to God, and say
to other sleepers on the way:
"Awake, and rise up from the dead
that Christ may shine on you instead!"

The Benedictus (Morning), the 
Magnificat (Evening), or 
Nunc dimittis (Night) may follow.

Prayer:
Almighty God, 
you bring your chosen people together in one communion, 
in the body of your Son, Jesus Christ our Lord.  
We rejoice in your light and your peace 
for your whole Church in heaven and on earth.
We pray especially for the Parish of the Falkland Islands...
Lord of mercy:
Lord, hear us.

Give to all who mourn a sure confidence in your loving care, 
that we may cast all our sorrow on you, 
and know the consolation of your love.
Lord of mercy:
Lord, hear us.

Give your faithful people pardon and peace, 
that we may be cleansed from all our sins, 
and serve you with a quiet mind.
Lord of mercy:
Lord, hear us.

Give us strength to meet the days ahead 
in the joyful expectation of eternal life with those you love.
Lord of mercy:
Lord, hear us.

Give to us who are still in our pilgrimage, 
and who walk as yet by faith, 
your Holy Spirit to lead us 
in holiness and righteousness all our days.
Lord of mercy:
Lord, hear us.

May all who have been made one with Christ 
in his death and in his resurrection 
die to sin and rise to newness of life.
Lord of mercy:
Lord, hear us.

When you came among us in majesty, O God,
you took the form of a servant.
May we whom you call to your priestly service
work to establish justice on earth,
that we may inherit your kingdom in heaven;
through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Almighty God, 
whose servant Ignatius zealously proclaimed 
the true humanity of Christ 
and witnessed to him, both in life and in death: 
keep the Church firm in its faith 
and grant us all the grace of our Savior, Jesus Christ, 
who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, 
one God, now and for ever. Amen.
       
Gathering our prayers and praises into one,
let us pray as our Savior has taught us.

- The Lord's Prayer

Grant us boldness to desire a place in your kingdom,
the courage to drink the cup of suffering,
and the grace to find in service
the glory you promise. Amen.

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The psalms, the second collect  and the invitation to the Lord's Prayer are from
_Celebrating Common Prayer_ (Mowbray), (c) The Society of
Saint Francis 1992, which is used with permission.

The canticle and first collect are from _Common Worship: Daily Prayer,
Preliminary Edition_, copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2002.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The opening prayer of thanksgiving and the closing prayer use phrases from a
prayer in _Opening Prayers: Collects in Contemporary Language_.
Canterbury Press, Norwich, 1999.

Hymn (c) 1991 by Hope Publishing Co., Carol Stream, IL  60188.  
All rights reserved.  Used by permission.
For permission to reproduce this hymn in all territories except the UK, 
contact:  Hope Publishing Company, 
www.hopepublishing.com
In the UK: contact The Revd. Mary J. Hancock, 55 Huntspill Street,
London  SW17 0AA England

The intercession is from _Patterns for Worship_, material from
which is included in this service is copyright (c) The Archbishops'
Council, 1995.

After the Apostles, Ignatius was the second bishop of Antioch in Syria. His
predecessor, of whom little is known, was named Euodius. Whether he knew
any of the Apostles directly is uncertain. Little is known of his life except for
the very end of it. Early in the second century (perhaps around 107 AD, during
the reign of the Emperor Trajan), he was arrested by the Imperial authorities,
condemned to death, and transported to Rome to die in the arena. By thus
dealing with a leader, the rulers hoped to terrify the rank and file. Instead,
Ignatius took the opportunity to encourage them, speaking to groups of
Christians at every town along the way. When the prison escort reached the
west coast of Asia Minor, it halted before taking ship, and delegations from
several Asian churches were able to visit Ignatius, to speak with him at length,
to assist him with items for his journey, and to bid him an affectionate farewell
and commend him to the grace of God. In response he wrote seven letters that
have been preserved: five to congregations that had greeted him, en masse or
by delegates (Ephesians, Magnesians, Trallians, Philadelphians, and
Smyrnaeans), one to the congregation that would greet him at his destination
(Romans), and one to Polycarp, Bishop of Smyrna and disciple of the Apostle
John.
The themes with which he is chiefly concerned in his letters are (1) the
importance of maintaining Christian unity in love and sound doctrine (with
warnings against factionalism and against the heresy of Docetism -- the belief
that Christ was not fully human and did not have a material body or really
suffer and die), (2) the role of the clergy as a focus of Christian unity, (3)
Christian martyrdom as a glorious privilege, eagerly to be grasped.
He writes:
I am God's wheat, ground fine by the lion's teeth to be made purest bread for
Christ.
No early pleasures, no kingdoms of this world can benefit me in any way. I
prefer death in Christ Jesus to power over the farthest limits of the earth. He
who died in place of us is the one object of my quest. He who rose for our
sakes is my one desire. The time for my birth is close at hand. Forgive me, my
brothers. Do not stand in the way of my birth to real life; do not wish me
stillborn. My desire is to belong to God. Do not, then, hand me back to the
world. do not try to tempt me with material things. Let me attain pure light.
Only on my arrival there can I be fully a human being. Give me the privilege of
imitating the passion of my God.


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