OREMUS: 14 October 2005

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Thu Oct 13 17:00:00 GMT 2005


*******************************************************
Visit our website at http://www.oremus.org
There you will find links to each day's Oremus, an archive for the past year,
and the lectionary and calendar we follow. You can access our online
hymnal, collection of liturgical texts and a NRSV Bible Browser at our site.
We also provide links to other forms of Anglican daily prayer
and a site to leave and view prayer requests. An opportunity to support our work
is also now available.
*******************************************************

OREMUS for Friday, October 14, 2005 
Teresa of Avila, Teacher of the Faith, 1582

O Lord, open our lips.
And our mouth shall proclaim your praise.

Blessed are you, O God, the rock of our salvation,
whose gifts can never fail.
You deepen the faith you have already bestowed
and let its power be seen in your servants.
For these and all your mercies, we praise you:
Father, Son, and Holy Spirit:
Blessed be God for ever.

An opening canticle may be sung. 

http://www.oremus.org/ocan.html

Psalm 77

I will cry aloud to God;*
 I will cry aloud and he will hear me.
In the day of my trouble I sought the Lord;*
 my hands were stretched out by night and did not tire;
   I refused to be comforted.
I think of God, I am restless,*
 I ponder and my spirit faints.
You will not let my eyelids close;*
 I am troubled and I cannot speak.
I consider the days of old;*
 I remember the years long past;
I commune with my heart in the night;*
 I ponder and search my mind.
Will the Lord cast me off for ever?*
 will he no more show his favour?
Has his loving-kindness come to an end for ever?*
 has his promise failed for evermore?
Has God forgotten to be gracious?*
 has he, in his anger, withheld his compassion?
And I said, 'My grief is this:*
 the right hand of the Most High has lost its power.'
I will remember the works of the Lord,*
 and call to mind your wonders of old time.
I will meditate on all your acts*
 and ponder your mighty deeds.
Your way, O God, is holy;*
 who is so great a god as our God?
You are the God who works wonders*
 and have declared your power among the peoples.
By your strength you have redeemed your people,*
 the children of Jacob and Joseph.
The waters saw you, O God;
   the waters saw you and trembled;*
 the very depths were shaken.
The clouds poured out water; the skies thundered;*
 your arrows flashed to and fro;
The sound of your thunder was in the whirlwind;
   your lightnings lit up the world;*
 the earth trembled and shook.
Your way was in the sea,
   and your paths in the great waters,*
 yet your footsteps were not seen.
You led your people like a flock*
 by the hand of Moses and Aaron.

A Song of the Justified (Romans 4.24,25; 5.1-5,8,9,11)

God reckons as righteous those who believe,
who believe in him who raised Jesus from the dead;

For Christ was handed over to death for our sins,
and raised to life for our justification.

Since we are justified by faith,
we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ.

Through Christ we have gained access
to the grace in which we stand,
and rejoice in our hope of the glory of God.

We even exult in our sufferings,
for suffering produces endurance,

And endurance brings hope,
and our hope is not in vain,

Because God's love has been poured into our hearts,
through the Holy Spirit, given to us.

God proves his love for us:
while we were yet sinners Christ died for us.

Since we have been justified by his death,
how much more shall we be saved from God's wrath.

Therefore, we exult in God through our Lord Jesus Christ,
in whom we have now received our reconciliation.

Psalm 147:1-12

Alleluia!
   How good it is to sing praises to our God!*
 how pleasant it is to honour him with praise!
The Lord rebuilds Jerusalem;*
 he gathers the exiles of Israel.
He heals the brokenhearted*
 and binds up their wounds.
He counts the number of the stars*
 and calls them all by their names.
Great is our Lord and mighty in power;*
 there is no limit to his wisdom.
The Lord lifts up the lowly,*
 but casts the wicked to the ground.
Sing to the Lord with thanksgiving;*
 make music to our God upon the harp.
He covers the heavens with clouds*
 and prepares rain for the earth;
He makes grass to grow upon the mountains*
 and green plants to serve us all.
He provides food for flocks and herds*
 and for the young ravens when they cry.
He is not impressed by the might of a horse,*
 he has no pleasure in human strength;
But the Lord has pleasure in those who fear him,*
 in those who await his gracious favour.
 Alleluia!

READING [Mark 13:28-31]:

Jesus said, 'From the fig tree learn its lesson: as soon
as its branch becomes tender and puts forth its leaves,
you know that summer is near. So also, when you see these
things taking place, you know that he is near, at the
very gates. Truly I tell you, this generation will not
pass away until all these things have taken place. Heaven
and earth will pass away, but my words will not pass
away.'

For another Biblical reading,

Deuteronomy 10:1-5,10-22

HYMN 
Words: Henry Williams Baker, 1861
Tune: Ravenshaw 
http://www.oremus.org/hymnal/l/l464.html
Hit "Back" in your browser to return to Oremus.

Lord, thy Word abideth,
and our footsteps guideth;
who its truth believeth
light and joy receiveth.

When our foes are near us,
then thy Word doth cheer us,
Word of consolation,
message of salvation.

When the storms are o'er us,
and dark clouds before us,
then its light directeth,
and our way protecteth.

Who can tell the pleasure,
who recount the treasure,
by thy Word imparted
to the simple-hearted?

Word of mercy, giving
succor to the living;
word of life, supplying
comfort to the dying!

O that we, discerning,
its most holy learning,
Lord, may love and fear thee,
evermore be near thee!

The Benedictus (Morning), the 
Magnificat (Evening), or 
Nunc dimittis (Night) may follow.

Prayer:
Faithful God, Lord of all,
we offer our prayers to you
for a world in need.

Lord of the Church, we pray for your people throughout the world,
that we may be one in the witness of saving love
and glorify you with one mind and mouth.
Faithful God,
hear our prayer.

Head of the Body,
give us wisdom to follow your commandments,
to live peacefully and do justly,
and to walk humbly with you.
Faithful God,
hear our prayer.

Creator and ruler of the universe,
give to all who exercise authority
wisdom and virtue to govern justly
and bring peace across the land.
Faithful God,
hear our prayer.

Source of all compassion,
give to all who suffer
the light of your presence and the caring of your people,
to bring calm and comfort.
Faithful God,
hear our prayer.

Giver of good to all,
take from us any evil thought or will
that we may forgive those who offend us or seek our harm
as you have forgiven us.
Faithful God,
hear our prayer.

All-knowing One, you who see us as we are
and know us as we should be:
forgive our sins, set us free from fear,
and give us lives abundant with your guiding presence,
that we may be yours for ever,
through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Majestic God,
you led your people like a flock
and delivered them by your mighty power in times of old:
do not forget your people in their troubles
and raise up your power
to sustain the poor and helpless,
for the honour of your Name. Amen.

Merciful God,
who by your Spirit raised up your servant Teresa of Avila
to reveal to your Church the way of perfection:
grant that her teaching
may awaken in us a longing for holiness,
until we attain to the perfect union of love
in Jesus Christ your Son our Lord,
who is alive and reigns with you,
in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and for ever. Amen.
       
Gathering our prayers and praises into one,
let us pray as our Savior has taught us.

- The Lord's Prayer

Bless the work entrusted to our hands,
that we may offer you an abundance of just works,
a rich harvest of peace. Amen.

*******************************************************
The psalms, the first collect and the invitation to the Lord's Prayer are from
_Celebrating Common Prayer_ (Mowbray), (c) The Society of
Saint Francis 1992, which is used with permission.

The canticle is from _Common Worship: Daily Prayer, Preliminary
Edition_, copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2002.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The opening prayer of thanksgiving and the closing prayer use phrases from a
prayer in _Opening Prayers: Collects in Contemporary Language_.
Canterbury Press, Norwich, 1999.

The intercession is adapted by Stephen Benner from a prayer by Arlene M.
Mark, from _Words for Worship_; used by permission of Herald
Press.

The second collect is from _Common Worship: Services and Prayers for
the Church of England_, material from which is included in this service is
copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2000.

Teresa de Cepeda y Ahumada (later known as Teresa de Jesus) was born in
Avila, Spain, 28 March 1515, one of ten children whose mother died when she
was fifteen. Her family was of partly Jewish ancestry. Teresa, having read the
letters of Jerome, decided to become a nun, and when she was 20, she entered
the Carmelite convent in Avila. There she fell seriously ill, was in a coma for a
while, and partially paralyzed for three years. In her early years as a nun, she
was, by her account, assiduous in prayer while sick but lax and lukewarm in
her prayers and devotions when the sickness had passed. However, her prayer
life eventually deepened, she began to have visions and a vivid sense of the
presence of God, and was converted to a life of extreme devotion.
In 1560 she resolved to reform the monastery that had, she thought, departed
from the order's original intention and become insufficiently austere. Her
proposed reforms included strict enclosure (the nuns were not to go to parties
and social gatherings in town, or to have social visitors at the convent, but to
stay in the convent and pray and study most of their waking hours) and
discalcing (literally, taking off one's shoes, a symbol of poverty, humility, and
the simple life, uncluttered by luxuries and other distractions). In 1562 she
opened a new monastery in Avila, over much opposition in the town and from
the older monastery. At length Teresa was given permission to proceed with
her reforms, and she travelled throughout Spain establishing seventeen houses
of Carmelites of the Strict (or Reformed) Observance (the others are called
Carmelites of the Ancient Observance). The reformed houses were small, poor,
disciplined, and strictly enclosed. Teresa died 4 October 1582.
Teresa is reported to have been very attractive in person, witty, candid, and
affectionate. She is remembered both for her practical achievements and
organizing skill and for her life of contemplative prayer. Her books are read as
aids to the spiritual life by many Christians of all denominations. Her Life is her
autobiography to 1562; The Way of Perfection is a treatise on the Christian
walk, written primarily for her sisters but of help to others as well; The Book
of Foundations deals with establishing, organizing and overseeing the daily
functioning of religious communities; The Interior Castle (or The Castle of The
Soul) deals with the life of Christ in the heart of the believer. Most of these are
available in paperback. 31 of her poems and 458 of her letters survive.
Christ has no body now but yours
No hands, no feet on earth but yours
Yours are the eyes through which He looks
compassion on this world
Christ has no body now on earth but yours.


More information about the oremus mailing list