OREMUS: 13 October 2005

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Wed Oct 12 21:12:27 GMT 2005


*******************************************************
Visit our website at http://www.oremus.org
There you will find links to each day's Oremus, an archive for the past year,
and the lectionary and calendar we follow. You can access our online
hymnal, collection of liturgical texts and a NRSV Bible Browser at our site.
We also provide links to other forms of Anglican daily prayer
and a site to leave and view prayer requests. An opportunity to support our work
is also now available.
*******************************************************

OREMUS for Thursday, October 13, 2005 
Edward the Confessor, King of England, 1066

O Lord, open our lips.
And our mouth shall proclaim your praise.

Blessed are you, O God, the rock of our salvation,
whose gifts can never fail.
You deepen the faith you have already bestowed
and let its power be seen in your servants.
For these and all your mercies, we praise you:
Father, Son, and Holy Spirit:
Blessed be God for ever.

An opening canticle may be sung. 

http://www.oremus.org/ocan.html

Psalm 107

Give thanks to the Lord, for he is good,*
 and his mercy endures for ever.
Let all those whom the Lord has redeemed proclaim*
 that he redeemed them from the hand of the foe.
He gathered them out of the lands;*
 from the east and from the west,
   from the north and from the south.
Some wandered in desert wastes;*
 they found no way to a city where they might dwell.
They were hungry and thirsty;*
 their spirits languished within them.
Then they cried to the Lord in their trouble,*
 and he delivered them from their distress.
He put their feet on a straight path*
 to go to a city where they might dwell.
Let them give thanks to the Lord for his mercy*
 and the wonders he does for his children.
For he satisfies the thirsty*
 and fills the hungry with good things.
Some sat in darkness and deep gloom,*
 bound fast in misery and iron;
Because they rebelled against the words of God*
 and despised the counsel of the Most High.
So he humbled their spirits with hard labour;*
 they stumbled and there was none to help.
Then they cried to the Lord in their trouble,*
 and he delivered them from their distress.
He led them out of darkness and deep gloom*
 and broke their bonds asunder.
Let them give thanks to the Lord for his mercy*
 and the wonders he does for his children.
For he shatters the doors of bronze*
 and breaks in two the iron bars.
Some were fools and took to rebellious ways;*
 they were afflicted because of their sins.
They abhorred all manner of food*
 and drew near to death's door.
Then they cried to the Lord in their trouble,*
 and he delivered them from their distress.
He sent forth his word and healed them*
 and saved them from the grave.
Let them give thanks to the Lord for his mercy*
 and the wonders he does for his children.
Let them offer a sacrifice of thanksgiving*
 and tell of his acts with shouts of joy.
Some went down to the sea in ships*
 and plied their trade in deep waters;
They beheld the works of the Lord*
 and his wonders in the deep.
Then he spoke and a stormy wind arose,*
 which tossed high the waves of the sea.
They mounted up to the heavens
   and fell back to the depths;*
 their hearts melted because of their peril.
They reeled and staggered like drunkards*
 and were at their wits' end.
Then they cried to the Lord in their trouble,*
 and he delivered them from their distress.
He stilled the storm to a whisper*
 and quieted the waves of the sea.
Then were they glad because of the calm,*
 and he brought them
   to the harbour they were bound for.
Let them give thanks to the Lord for his mercy*
 and the wonders he does for his children.
Let them exalt him in the congregation of the people*
 and praise him in the council of the elders.
The Lord changed rivers into deserts,*
 and water-springs into thirsty ground,
A fruitful land into salt flats,*
 because of the wickedness of those who dwell there.
He changed deserts into pools of water*
 and dry land into water-springs.
He settled the hungry there,*
 and they founded a city to dwell in.
They sowed fields and planted vineyards,*
 and brought in a fruitful harvest.
He blessed them, so that they increased greatly;*
 he did not let their herds decrease.
Yet when they were diminished and brought low,*
 through stress of adversity and sorrow,
He lifted up the poor out of misery*
 and multiplied their families like flocks of sheep.
He pours contempt on princes*
 and makes them wander in trackless wastes.
The upright will see this and rejoice,*
 but all wickedness will shut its mouth.
Whoever is wise will ponder these things,*
 and consider well the mercies of the Lord.

A Song of the Covenant (Isaiah 42:5-8a)

Thus says God, who created the heavens,
who fashioned the earth and all that dwells in it;

Who gives breath to the people upon it,
and spirit to those who walk in it,

'I am the Lord and I have called you in righteousness,
I have taken you by the hand and kept you;

'I have given you as a covenant to the people,
a light to the nations, to open the eyes that are blind.

'To bring out the captives from the dungeon,
from the prison, those who sit in darkness.

'I am the Lord, that is my name;
my glory I give to no other.'

Psalm 148

Alleluia!
   Praise the Lord from the heavens;*
 praise him in the heights.
Praise him, all you angels of his;*
 praise him, all his host.
Praise him, sun and moon;*
 praise him, all you shining stars.
Praise him, heaven of heavens,*
 and you waters above the heavens.
Let them praise the name of the Lord;*
 for he commanded and they were created.
He made them stand fast for ever and ever;*
 he gave them a law which shall not pass away.
Praise the Lord from the earth,*
 you sea-monsters and all deeps;
Fire and hail, snow and fog,*
 tempestuous wind, doing his will;
Mountains and all hills,*
 fruit trees and all cedars;
Wild beasts and all cattle,*
 creeping things and winged birds;
Kings of the earth and all peoples,*
 princes and all rulers of the world;
Young men and maidens,*
 old and young together.
Let them praise the name of the Lord,*
 for his name only is exalted,
   his splendour is over earth and heaven.
He has raised up strength for his people
   and praise for all his loyal servants,*
 the children of Israel, a people who are near him.
   Alleluia!

READING [Mark 13:24-27]:

Jesus said, 'But in those days, after that suffering,
the sun will be darkened,
   and the moon will not give its light,
and the stars will be falling from heaven,
   and the powers in the heavens will be shaken.
Then they will see "the Son of Man coming in clouds" with
great power and glory. Then he will send out the angels,
and gather his elect from the four winds, from the ends
of the earth to the ends of heaven.'

For another Biblical reading,
Deuteronomy 9:7-29

HYMN 
Words: William Orcutt Cushing, 1866
Tune: Jewels    
http://www.oremus.org/hymnal/w/w287.html
Hit "Back" in your browser to return to Oremus.

When he cometh, when he cometh
to make up his jewels,
all his jewels, precious jewels,
his loved and his own.
Refrain:
Like the stars of the morning,
his brightness adorning,
they shall shine in their beauty,
bright gems for his crown.

He will gather, he will gather
the gems for his kingdom;
all the pure ones, all the bright ones,
his loved and his own. Refrain

Little children, little children,
who love their Redeemer,
are the jewels, precious jewels,
his loved and his own. Refrain

The Benedictus (Morning), the 
Magnificat (Evening), or 
Nunc dimittis (Night) may follow.

Prayer:
Most holy and gracious God,
we praise you for the glorious freedom
we have together in Christ Jesus.

You have called us to be brothers and sisters
in the covenant of your Church.
Hear our desire to live in covenant relationships
of binding and loosing,
so that we may truly be your faithful people.
Gracious God,
hear our prayer.

Enlarge our understandings of how we can work together
to raise up your Church and your mission
in this technological age.
Gracious God,
hear our prayer.

Hear our prayer especially for the Diocese of
Southwark, England, The Rt Revd Thomas Frederick Butler, Bishop.
Gracious God,
hear our prayer.

Forgive us for not being sensitive to one another
and for preferring to be loners instead of joining in our common cause.
Gracious God,
hear our prayer.

As you have forgiven us, may we forgive one another.
May our love flow like an everlasting river,
making our baptismal covenant a daily reality.
Gracious God,
hear our prayer.

O God, your steadfast love endures for ever
and your faithfulness from one generation to another;
rescue your people from their distress,
still the storms of our self-will
and bring us to the haven you have prepared for us
in Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Sovereign God,
who set your servant Edward
upon the throne of an earthly kingdom
and inspired him with zeal for the kingdom of heaven:
grant that we may so confess the faith of Christ
by word and deed,
that we may, with all your saints, inherit your eternal glory;
through Jesus Christ your Son our Lord,
who is alive and reigns with you,
in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and for ever. Amen. 
       
Gathering our prayers and praises into one,
let us pray as our Savior has taught us.

- The Lord's Prayer

Bless the work entrusted to our hands,
that we may offer you an abundance of just works,
a rich harvest of peace. Amen.

*******************************************************
The psalms and the invitation to the Lord's Prayer are from _Celebrating
Common Prayer_ (Mowbray), (c) The Society of Saint Francis
1992, which is used with permission.

The canticle and the collect are from _Common Worship: Daily Prayer,
Preliminary Edition_, copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2002.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The opening prayer of thanksgiving and the closing prayer use phrases from a
prayer in _Opening Prayers: Collects in Contemporary Language_.
Canterbury Press, Norwich, 1999.

The intercession is adapted by Stephen Benner from a prayer by Emma
Richards, Villa Park, Illinois as adapted in _Words for Worship_;
used by permission of Herald Press.

The second collect is from _Common Worship: Services and Prayers for
the Church of England_, material from which is included in this service is
copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2000.

Edward was born in 1003. He was the last Saxon king to rule (for more than a
few months) in England. He is called "Edward the Confessor" to distinguish
him from another King of England, Edward the Martyr (c962-979), who was
assassinated (presumably by someone who wished to place Edward's younger
half-brother on the throne), and who came to be regarded, on doubtful
grounds, as a martyr for the faith. In Christian biographies, the term
"confessor" is often used to denote someone who has born witness to the faith
by his life, but who did not die as a martyr. Edward was the son of King
Ethelred the Unready. This does not mean that he was unprepared, but rather
that he was stubborn and wilful, and would not accept "rede," meaning advice
or counsel.
Aethelred was followed by several Danish kings of England, during whose rule
young Edward and his mother took refuge in Normandy. But the last Danish
king named Edward as his successor, and he was crowned in 1042. Opinions
on his success as a king vary. Some historians consider him weak and
indecisive, and say that his reign paved the way for the Norman Conquest.
Others say that his prudent management gave England more than twenty years
of peace and prosperity, with freedom from foreign domination, at a time when
powerful neighbors might well have dominated a less adroit ruler. He was
diligent in public and private worship, generous to the poor, and accessible to
subjects who sought redress of grievances.
While in exile, he had vowed to make a pilgrimage to Rome if his family
fortunes mended. However, his council told him that it was not expedient for
him to be so long out of the country. Accordingly, he spent his pilgrimage
money instead on the relief of the poor and the building of Westminster Abbey,
which stands today (rebuilt in the thirteenth century) as one of the great
churches of England, burial place of her kings and others deemed worthy of
special honor.
He died on 5 January 1066, leaving no offspring; and after his death, the throne
was claimed by his wife's brother, Harold the Saxon, and by William, Duke of
Normandy. William defeated and slew Harold at the Battle of Hastings (14
October 1066), and thereafter the kings and upper classes of England were
Norman-French rather than Anglo-Saxon. Edward is remembered, not on the
day of his death, but on the anniversary of the moving ("translation") of his
corpse to a new tomb, a date which is also the anniversary of the eve of the
Battle of Hastings, the end of Saxon England.



More information about the oremus mailing list