OREMUS: 24 May 2005

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Mon May 23 17:00:01 GMT 2005


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OREMUS for Tuesday, May 24, 2005
Jackson Kemper, First Missionary Bishop in the United States, 1870 

O Lord, open our lips.
And our mouth shall proclaim your praise.

Blessed are you, Almighty God, 
creator of the world and everything in it,
through Jesus Christ our Lord. 
He is the peace between us,
and has broken down the barrier of hostility.
He has made us one new humanity
and reconciled us to you by the cross:
you chose us all in Christ to praise his glory.
For these and all your mercies, we praise you:
Father, Son, and Holy Spirit:
Blessed be God for ever.

An opening canticle may be sung. 

http://www.oremus.org/ocan.html

Psalm 30

I will exalt you, O Lord,
   because you have lifted me up*
 and have not let my enemies triumph over me.
O Lord my God, I cried out to you,*
 and you restored me to health.
You brought me up, O Lord, from the dead;*
 you restored my life as I was going down to the grave.
Sing to the Lord, you servants of his;*
 give thanks for the remembrance of his holiness.
For his wrath endures but the twinkling of an eye,*
 his favour for a lifetime.
Weeping may spend the night,*
 but joy comes in the morning.
While I felt secure, I said,
   'I shall never be disturbed.*
 You, Lord, with your favour,
   made me as strong as the mountains.'
Then you hid your face,*
 and I was filled with fear.
I cried to you, O Lord;*
 I pleaded with the Lord, saying,
'What profit is there in my blood,
   if I go down to the Pit?*
 will the dust praise you or declare your faithfulness?
'Hear, O Lord, and have mercy upon me;*
 O Lord, be my helper.'
You have turned my wailing into dancing;*
 you have put off my sack-cloth and clothed me with joy;
Therefore my heart sings to you without ceasing;*
 O Lord my God, I will give you thanks for ever.

A Song of the Holy City (Revelation 21:1-5a)

I saw a new heaven and a new earth,
for the first heaven and the first earth had passed away
and the sea was no more.

And I saw the holy city, new Jerusalem,
coming down out of heaven from God,
prepared as a bride adorned for her husband.

And I heard a great voice from the throne saying,
'Behold, my dwelling is with my people.

'I will dwell with them and they shall be mine,
and I myself will be with them.

'I will wipe away every tear from their eyes,
and death shall be no more.

'Neither shall there be mourning,
nor crying, nor pain any more,
for the former things have passed away.'

And the One who sat upon the throne said,
'Behold, I make all things new.'

Psalm 146

Alleluia!
   Praise the Lord, O my soul!*
 I will praise the Lord as long as I live;
   I will sing praises to my God while I have my being.
Put not your trust in rulers,
   nor in any child of earth,*
 for there is no help in them.
When they breathe their last, they return to earth,*
 and in that day their thoughts perish.
Happy are they who have the God of Jacob
   for their help!*
 whose hope is in the Lord their God;
Who made heaven and earth, the seas,
   and all that is in them;*
 who keeps his promise for ever;
Who gives justice to those who are oppressed,*
 and food to those who hunger.
The Lord sets the prisoners free;
   the Lord opens the eyes of the blind;*
 the Lord lifts up those who are bowed down;
The Lord loves the righteous;
   the Lord cares for the stranger;*
 he sustains the orphan and widow,
   but frustrates the way of the wicked.
The Lord shall reign for ever,*
 your God, O Zion, throughout all generations.
   Alleluia!

READING [Proverbs 10:6-8,11-12,27-29]:

Blessings are on the head of the righteous,
   but the mouth of the wicked conceals violence.
The memory of the righteous is a blessing,
   but the name of the wicked will rot.
The wise of heart will heed commandments,
   but a babbling fool will come to ruin.
The mouth of the righteous is a fountain of life,
   but the mouth of the wicked conceals violence.
Hatred stirs up strife,
   but love covers all offences.
The fear of the LORD prolongs life,
   but the years of the wicked will be short.
The hope of the righteous ends in gladness,
   but the expectation of the wicked comes to nothing.

The way of the LORD is a stronghold for the upright,
   but destruction for evildoers.

For another Biblical reading,
1 Corinthians 7:25-31

HYMN 
Words: Horatius Bonar, 1857
Tune: Kingsland      
http://www.oremus.org/hymnal/t/t698.html
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Thy way, not mine, O Lord,
however dark it be;
lead me by thine own hand,
choose out the path for me.

Smooth let it be or rough,
it will be still the best;
winding or straight, it leads
right onward to thy rest.

I dare not choose my lot;
I would not, if I might;
choose thou for me, my God,
so I shall walk aright.

The kingdom that I seek
is thine; so let the way
that leads to it be thine,
else I must surely stray.

Take thou my cup, and it
with joy or sorrow fill,
as best to thee may seem;
choose thou my good and ill.

Choose thou for me my friends,
my sickness or my health;
choose thou my cares for me
my poverty or wealth.

Not mine, not mine the choice
in things or great or small;
be thou my Guide, my Strength
my wisdom and my all.

The Benedictus (Morning), the 
Magnificat (Evening), or 
Nunc dimittis (Night) may follow.

Prayer:
O God our Salvation, you are near to all who call:
hear and answer our prayers.

You are a refuge for the oppressed;
be our stronghold in troubled times.

You stand at the right hand of the needy;
rescue all who are wrongfully condemned.

You raise the poor from the dust;
restore dignity to those who seek refuge.

You give food to the hungry;
uphold the cause of the destitute.

You watch over those who wander and sustain the widow;
provide protection in the face of danger.

You heal the brokenhearted;
bind up the wounds of all who suffer.

You call us to be your Church, especially in the Diocese of
North Dakota, USA, The Rt Revd Michael Gene Smith, Bishop.
send us out to do your will in the world.

You are a mighty God who loves justice;
establish your equity for all people.

Praise be to you, O Lord;
you hear and answer our prayers.

God our Father,
glorious in giving and restoring life,
do not hide your face from your people
overcome with loneliness and fear;
turn our mourning into dancing
and raise us up with your Son,
that we may rejoice in your presence for ever. Amen.

Lord God, 
we give you thank for your servant Jackson Kemper,
who spread the Gospel throughout the western United States:
Grant that the Church may always be faithful to its mission, 
and have the vision, courage, and perseverance 
to make known to all people the Good News of Jesus Christ; 
who with you and the Holy Spirit lives and reigns, 
one God, for ever and ever. Amen.
       
Gathering our prayers and praises into one,
let us pray as our Savior has taught us.

- The Lord's Prayer

Draw your Church together, O God,
into one great company of disciples,
together following our Lord Jesus Christ
into every walk of life,
together serving him in his mission to the world,
and together witnessing to his love. Amen.

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The psalms and the invitation to the Lord's Prayer are from _Celebrating
Common Prayer_ (Mowbray), (c) The Society of Saint Francis
1992, which is used with permission.

The canticle is from _Common Worship: Daily Prayer, Preliminary
Edition_, copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2002.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The opening prayer of thanksgiving and the closing sentence are adapted from
prayers in _New Patterns for Worship_, copyright (c) The
Archbishops' Council, 2002.

The intercession is adapted by Stephen Benner from a prayer by Karen
Moshier Shenk and Rebecca J. Slough, in _MPH Bulletin_,
10/13/85, as adapted in _Words for Worship_; used by permission
of Herald Press.

The second collect is from _The Proper for the
Lesser Feasts and Fasts_, 3rd edition, (c)
1980 The Church Pension Fund.

Jackson Kemper was born 24 December 1789 in Pleasant Valley, New York,
attended Columbia College, and was ordained a priest in 1814. In 1835, the
Episcopal Church undertook to consecrate missionary bishops to preach the
Gospel west of the settled areas, and Kemper was the first to be chosen. He
promptly headed west. Having found that clergy who had lived all their lives in
the settled East were slow to respond to his call to join him on the frontier, he
determined to recruit priests from among men who were already in the West,
and established a college in St. Louis, Missouri, for that purpose. He went on
to found Nashotah House and Racine College in Wisconsin. He constantly
urged a more extensive outreach to the Indian peoples, and translations of the
Scriptures and the services of the Church into Indian languages. From 1859 till
his death in 1870, he was bishop of Wisconsin, but the effect of his labors
covered a far wider area. [James Kiefer]


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