OREMUS: 2 March 2005

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Tue Mar 1 23:26:14 GMT 2005


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OREMUS for Wednesday, March 2, 2005
Chad, Bishop of Lichfield, Missionary, 672

O God, make speed to save us;
O Lord, make haste to help us.

Blessed are you, God of compassion and mercy:
your steadfast love is shown to every living thing;
your word calls us forth and your law revives and refreshes.
You call us to repent our misuse of your gifts,
that we may be transformed by your wisdom
to manifest for others
the mercy of our crucified and risen Lord.
For these and all your mercies, we praise you:
Father, Son, and Holy Spirit,
Blessed be God for ever!

An opening canticle may be sung. 

http://www.oremus.org/lentocan.html

Psalm 90

Lord, you have been our refuge*
 from one generation to another.
Before the mountains were brought forth,
   or the land and the earth were born,*
 from age to age you are God.
You turn us back to the dust and say,*
 'Go back, O child of earth.'
For a thousand years in your sight
   are like yesterday when it is past*
 and like a watch in the night.
You sweep us away like a dream;*
 we fade away suddenly like the grass.
In the morning it is green and flourishes;*
 in the evening it is dried up and withered.
For we consume away in your displeasure;*
 we are afraid because of your wrathful indignation.
Our iniquities you have set before you,*
 and our secret sins in the light of your countenance.
When you are angry, all our days are gone;*
 we bring our years to an end like a sigh.
The span of our life is seventy years,
   perhaps in strength even eighty;*
 yet the sum of them is but labour and sorrow,
   for they pass away quickly and we are gone.
Who regards the power of your wrath?*
 who rightly fears your indignation?
So teach us to number our days*
 that we may apply our hearts to wisdom.
Return, O Lord; how long will you tarry?*
 be gracious to your servants.
Satisfy us by your loving-kindness in the morning;*
 so shall we rejoice and be glad all the days of our life.
Make us glad by the measure of the days
   that you afflicted us*
 and the years in which we suffered adversity.
Show your servants your works*
 and your splendour to their children.
May the graciousness of the Lord our God be upon us;*
 prosper the work of our hands;
   prosper our handiwork.

A Song of the Word of the Lord (Isaiah 55:6-11)

Seek the Lord while he may be found,
call upon him while he is near;

Let the wicked abandon their ways,
and the unrighteous their thoughts;

Return to the Lord,
who will have mercy;
to our God, who will richly pardon.

'For my thoughts are not your thoughts,
neither are your ways my ways', says the Lord.

'For as the heavens are higher than the earth,
so are my ways higher than your ways
and my thoughts than your thoughts.

'As the rain and the snow come down from above,
and return not again but water the earth,

'Bringing forth life and giving growth,
seed for sowing and bread to eat,

'So is my word that goes forth from my mouth;
it will not return to me fruitless,

'But it will accomplish that which I purpose,
and succeed in the task I gave it.'

Psalm 147:1-12

How good it is to sing praises to our God!*
 how pleasant it is to honour him with praise!
The Lord rebuilds Jerusalem;*
 he gathers the exiles of Israel.
He heals the brokenhearted*
 and binds up their wounds.
He counts the number of the stars*
 and calls them all by their names.
Great is our Lord and mighty in power;*
 there is no limit to his wisdom.
The Lord lifts up the lowly,*
 but casts the wicked to the ground.
Sing to the Lord with thanksgiving;*
 make music to our God upon the harp.
He covers the heavens with clouds*
 and prepares rain for the earth;
He makes grass to grow upon the mountains*
 and green plants to serve us all.
He provides food for flocks and herds*
 and for the young ravens when they cry.
He is not impressed by the might of a horse,*
 he has no pleasure in human strength;
But the Lord has pleasure in those who fear him,*
 in those who await his gracious favour.

READING [John 5:19-24]:

Jesus said to them, 'Very truly, I tell you, the Son can
do nothing on his own, but only what he sees the Father
doing; for whatever the Father does, the Son does
likewise. The Father loves the Son and shows him all that
he himself is doing; and he will show him greater works
than these, so that you will be astonished. Indeed, just
as the Father raises the dead and gives them life, so
also the Son gives life to whomsoever he wishes. The
Father judges no one but has given all judgement to the
Son, so that all may honour the Son just as they honour
the Father. Anyone who does not honour the Son does not
honour the Father who sent him. Very truly, I tell you,
anyone who hears my word and believes him who sent me has
eternal life, and does not come under judgement, but has
passed from death to life.

For another Biblical reading,
Numbers 22:1-21

HYMN 
Words: Percy Dearmer, 1906
Tune: Nun lasst uns Gott dem Herren
http://www.oremus.org/hymnal/a/a002.html
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A brighter dawn is breaking,
and earth with praise is waking;
for thou, O King most highest,
the power of death defiest;

and thou hast come victorious,
with risen Body glorious,
who now for ever livest,
and life abundant givest.

O free the world from blindness,
and fill the world with kindness,
give sinners resurrection,
bring striving to perfection;

in sickness give us healing,
in doubt thy clear revealing,
that praise to thee be given
in earth as in thy heaven.

The Benedictus (Morning), the 
Magnificat (Evening), or 
Nunc dimittis (Night) may follow.

Prayer:
Teach us, O Lord, the way of your statutes:
And lead us in the path of your commandments.

Keep our nation under your care:
And guide us in justice and truth.

O Lord, deal graciously with your servants;
teach us discernment and knowledge.

Let not the needy be forgotten:
Nor the hope of the poor be taken away.

Guide the meek in judgement:
And teach your ways to the gentle.

Lord, remember your people:
Whom you have purchased and redeemed of old.

We pray for your Church, O Lord, especially
the Diocese of Maseno North, Kenya, 
The Rt Revd Simon Mutingole Oketch, Bishop;
the Diocese of Maseno South, Kenya, 
The Rt Revd Francis Mwayi Abiero, Bishop;
and the Diocese of Maseno West, Kenya,
The Rt Revd Joseph Otieno Wasongam, Bishop.
Lord, in your mercy, hear our prayer.

Give ear to our prayers, O Lord, 
and direct the way of your servants in safety 
under your protection, 
that, amid all the changes of our earthly pilgrimage, 
we may be guarded by your mighty aid; 
through Jesus Christ our Lord, 
who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, 
one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

Almighty God,
from the first fruits of the English nation who turned to Christ,
you called your servant Chad
to be an evangelist and bishop of his own people:
give us grace so to follow his peaceable nature,
      humble spirit and prayerful life,
that we may truly commend to others
the faith which we ourselves profess;
through Jesus Christ your Son our Lord,
who is alive and reigns with you,
in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and for ever.Amen.

Trusting in the compassion of God,
let us pray as our Savior taught us:

- The Lord's Prayer

God of love,
turn our hearts to your ways;
and give us peace. Amen.

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The psalms are from _Celebrating Common Prayer_ (Mowbray),
(c) The Society of Saint Francis 1992, which is used with permission.

The canticle, the opening thanksgiving and the invitation to the Lord's Prayer
from _Common Worship: Daily Prayer, Preliminary Edition_,
copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2002.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The opening prayer of thanksgiving adapts phrases from _Opening
Prayers: Collects in Contemporary Language_. Canterbury Press,
Norwich, 1999.

The first collect is from _The Proper for the Lesser Feasts and
Fasts_, 3rd edition, (c) 1980 The Church Pension Fund.

The closing sentence is from An Invitation to Prayer, (c) The Church of
England, 2001-2003.

The second collect is from _Common Worship: Services and Prayers for
the Church of England_, material from which is included in this service is
copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2000.

Chad, Bishop of Lichfield, is perhaps best known for not being Archbishop of
York. He was elected and duly installed, but various persons raised objections,
and rather than cause division in the Church he withdrew in favor of the other
candidate, Wilfrid (see 12 Oct). (The objection was that some of the bishops
who had consecrated him--although not Chad himself--were holdouts who,
even after the Synod of Whitby had supposedly settled the question in 663,
insisted on preserving Celtic customs on the date of celebrating Easter and
similar questions, instead of conforming to the customs of the remainder of
Western Christendom.) He was soon after made Bishop of Lichfield in Mercia.
There he travelled about as he had when Archbishop of York, always on foot
(until the Archbishop of Canterbury gave him a hors and ordered him to ride it,
at least on long journeys), preaching and teaching wherever he went. He served
there for only two and a half years before his death, but he made a deep
impression. In the following decades, many chapels, and many wells, were
constructed in Mercia and named for him. (It was an old custom to dig a well
where one was needed, and to mark it with one's own name or another's, that
thirsty travellers and others might drink and remember the name with
gratitude.) [James Kiefer]



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