OREMUS: 9 June 2005

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Wed Jun 8 17:00:01 GMT 2005


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OREMUS for Thursday, June 9, 2005 
Columba, Abbot of Iona, Missionary, 597

O Lord, open our lips.
And our mouth shall proclaim your praise.

Blessed are you, merciful God;
for your Son, our Messiah and Lord,
who did not turn aside from the path of suffering
and did not spare his disciples the prospect of rejection.
You call us through your Spirit
to abandon the security of the easy way
and to follow in Christ's footsteps towards the cross and true life.
For these and all your mercies, we praise you:
Father, Son, and Holy Spirit:
Blessed be God for ever.

An opening canticle may be sung. 

http://www.oremus.org/ocan.html

Psalm 107

Give thanks to the Lord, for he is good,*
 and his mercy endures for ever.
Let all those whom the Lord has redeemed proclaim*
 that he redeemed them from the hand of the foe.
He gathered them out of the lands;*
 from the east and from the west,
   from the north and from the south.
Some wandered in desert wastes;*
 they found no way to a city where they might dwell.
They were hungry and thirsty;*
 their spirits languished within them.
Then they cried to the Lord in their trouble,*
 and he delivered them from their distress.
He put their feet on a straight path*
 to go to a city where they might dwell.
Let them give thanks to the Lord for his mercy*
 and the wonders he does for his children.
For he satisfies the thirsty*
 and fills the hungry with good things.
Some sat in darkness and deep gloom,*
 bound fast in misery and iron;
Because they rebelled against the words of God*
 and despised the counsel of the Most High.
So he humbled their spirits with hard labour;*
 they stumbled and there was none to help.
Then they cried to the Lord in their trouble,*
 and he delivered them from their distress.
He led them out of darkness and deep gloom*
 and broke their bonds asunder.
Let them give thanks to the Lord for his mercy*
 and the wonders he does for his children.
For he shatters the doors of bronze*
 and breaks in two the iron bars.
Some were fools and took to rebellious ways;*
 they were afflicted because of their sins.
They abhorred all manner of food*
 and drew near to death's door.
Then they cried to the Lord in their trouble,*
 and he delivered them from their distress.
He sent forth his word and healed them*
 and saved them from the grave.
Let them give thanks to the Lord for his mercy*
 and the wonders he does for his children.
Let them offer a sacrifice of thanksgiving*
 and tell of his acts with shouts of joy.
Some went down to the sea in ships*
 and plied their trade in deep waters;
They beheld the works of the Lord*
 and his wonders in the deep.
Then he spoke and a stormy wind arose,*
 which tossed high the waves of the sea.
They mounted up to the heavens
   and fell back to the depths;*
 their hearts melted because of their peril.
They reeled and staggered like drunkards*
 and were at their wits' end.
Then they cried to the Lord in their trouble,*
 and he delivered them from their distress.
He stilled the storm to a whisper*
 and quieted the waves of the sea.
Then were they glad because of the calm,*
 and he brought them
   to the harbour they were bound for.
Let them give thanks to the Lord for his mercy*
 and the wonders he does for his children.
Let them exalt him in the congregation of the people*
 and praise him in the council of the elders.
The Lord changed rivers into deserts,*
 and water-springs into thirsty ground,
A fruitful land into salt flats,*
 because of the wickedness of those who dwell there.
He changed deserts into pools of water*
 and dry land into water-springs.
He settled the hungry there,*
 and they founded a city to dwell in.
They sowed fields and planted vineyards,*
 and brought in a fruitful harvest.
He blessed them, so that they increased greatly;*
 he did not let their herds decrease.
Yet when they were diminished and brought low,*
 through stress of adversity and sorrow,
He lifted up the poor out of misery*
 and multiplied their families like flocks of sheep.
He pours contempt on princes*
 and makes them wander in trackless wastes.
The upright will see this and rejoice,*
 but all wickedness will shut its mouth.
Whoever is wise will ponder these things,*
 and consider well the mercies of the Lord.

A Song of the Redeemed (Revelation 7. 9-10,14b-17)

Behold, a great multitude
 which no one could number,

>From every nation,
from all tribes and peoples and tongues,
 standing before the throne and the Lamb.

They were clothed in white robes
 and had palms in their hands,
 and they cried with a loud voice, saying,

'Salvation belongs to our God
 who sits on the throne,
 and to the Lamb.'

These are they
who have come out of the great tribulation,
 they have washed their robes
 and made them white in the blood of the Lamb;

Therefore they stand before the throne of God,
 whom they serve day and night within the temple.

And the One who sits upon the throne
 will shelter them with his presence.

They shall never again feel hunger or thirst,
 the sun shall not strike them,
 nor any scorching heat.

For the Lamb at the heart of the throne
 will be their Shepherd,

He will guide them to springs of living water,
 and God will wipe away every tear from their eyes.

To the One who sits on the throne and to the Lamb
 be blessing and honour and glory and might,
 for ever and ever. Amen.

Psalm 147:13-end

Alleluia!
Worship the Lord, O Jerusalem;*
 praise your God, O Zion;
For he has strengthened the bars of your gates;*
 he has blessed your children within you.
He has established peace on your borders;*
 he satisfies you with the finest wheat.
He sends out his command to the earth,*
 and his word runs very swiftly.
He gives snow like wool;*
 he scatters hoarfrost like ashes.
He scatters his hail like bread crumbs;*
 who can stand against his cold?
He sends forth his word and melts them;*
 he blows with his wind and the waters flow.
He declares his word to Jacob,*
 his statutes and his judgements to Israel.
He has not done so to any other nation;*
 to them he has not revealed his judgements.
   Alleluia!

READING [Matthew 9:18-26]:

While Jesus was saying these things to them, suddenly a
leader of the synagogue came in and knelt before him,
saying, 'My daughter has just died; but come and lay your
hand on her, and she will live.' And Jesus got up and
followed him, with his disciples. Then suddenly a woman
who had been suffering from haemorrhages for twelve years
came up behind him and touched the fringe of his cloak,
for she said to herself, 'If I only touch his cloak, I
will be made well.' Jesus turned, and seeing her he said,
'Take heart, daughter; your faith has made you well.' And
instantly the woman was made well. When Jesus came to the
leader's house and saw the flute-players and the crowd
making a commotion, he said, 'Go away; for the girl is
not dead but sleeping.' And they laughed at him. But when
the crowd had been put outside, he went in and took her
by the hand, and the girl got up. And the report of this
spread throughout that district.

For another Biblical reading,
Genesis 19:1-11

HYMN 
Words: John Greenleaf Whittier (1807-1892), 1867
Tune: Bishopthorpe
http://www.oremus.org/hymnal/i/i226.html
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Immortal love, forever full,
forever flowing free,
forever shared, forever whole,
a never ebbing sea!

Our outward lips confess the name
all other names above;
love only knoweth whence it came,
and comprehendeth love.

We may not climb the heavenly steeps
to bring the Lord Christ down;
In vain we search the lowest deeps,
for him no depths can drown.

But warm, sweet, tender, even yet,
a present help is he;
and faith still has its Olivet,
and love its Galilee.

The healing of his seamless dress
is by our beds of pain;
we touch him in life's throng and press,
and we are whole again.

Through him the first fond prayers are said
our lips of childhood frame,
the last low whispers of our dead
are burdened with his Name.

O Lord and Master of us all,
whate'er our name or sign,
we own thy sway, we hear thy call,
we test our lives by thine.

The Benedictus (Morning), the 
Magnificat (Evening), or 
Nunc dimittis (Night) may follow.

Prayer:
God of the apostles and martyrs,
we thank you for the hope that is from the beginning.
We bless you for the good news of Jesus
crucified, risen, and interceding for us
until his coming again in glory.

We commend to your care
all who walk and weep in grief and regret.

We pray in hope of your mercy.

We commend to you
all who live far from your image.
We pray in hope of your salvation.

We commend Holy Church,
especially the Diocese of the Northern Territory, Australia,
The Rt Revd Philip Leslie Freier, Bishop.
We pray in hope of your glory.

We commend to your justice all peoples
who participate in oppression, strife and domination of others.
We pray in hope of your justice and peace.

We commend to you all who have died.
We pray in hope of your resurrection.

We commend to you our unfinished business.
We pray in hope of rest in you.

Lord, here we have no abiding city,
but seek that which is to come:
guide and deliver us in all earthly changes
and direct our way towards the haven of salvation;
through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Almighty God,
who filled the heart of Columba
with the joy of the Holy Spirit
and with deep love for those in his care:
may your pilgrim people follow him,
strong in faith, sustained by hope,
and one in the love that binds us to you;
through Jesus Christ your Son our Lord,
who is alive and reigns with you,
in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and for ever. Amen.
       
Gathering our prayers and praises into one,
let us pray as our Savior has taught us.

- The Lord's Prayer

In your great power,
transform all our fear
into faith and awe in your saving presence; 
through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

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The psalms, first collect and the invitation to the Lord's Prayer are from
_Celebrating Common Prayer_ (Mowbray), (c) The Society of
Saint Francis 1992, which is used with permission.

The canticle is from _Common Worship: Daily Prayer, Preliminary
Edition_, copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2002.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The opening prayer of thanksgiving and the closing prayer are adapted from
prayers in _Opening Prayers: Collects in Contemporary Language_.
Canterbury Press, Norwich, 1999.

The intercession is reprinted from _THE DAILY OFFICE: A Book of
Hours of Daily Prayer after the Use of the Order of Saint Luke_, (c)
1997 by The Order of Saint Luke. Used by permission.

The second collect is from _Common Worship: Services and Prayers for
the Church of England_, material from which is included in this service is
copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2000.

In the troubled and violent Dark Ages in Northern Europe, monasteries served
as inns, orphanages, centers of learning, and even as fortresses. The light of
civilization flickered dimly and might have gone out altogether if it had not
been for these convent-shelters.
Columba, a stern and strong monk from Ireland, founded three such
establishments. He founded the monasteries of Derry and Durrow in his native
Ireland, and the island monastery of Iona on the coast of Scotland. Iona was
the center of operations for the conversion of the Scots and Picts, and became
the most famous religious house in Scotland. There Columba baptized Brude,
King of the Picts, and later a King of the Scots came to this Abbot of the "Holy
Isle" for baptism.
The historian Bede tells us that Columba led many to Christianity by his
"preaching and example." He was much admired for his physical as well as
spiritual prowess. He was a strict ascetic and remained physically vigorous and
unflagging in his missionary and pastoral journeys throughout his seventy-six
years of life. The memory of Columba lives on in Scotland, and Iona, though
desecrated during the Reformation, today houses a flourishing ecumenical
religious community. [James Kiefer]


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