OREMUS: 29 July 2005

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Thu Jul 28 20:12:52 GMT 2005


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OREMUS for Friday, July 29, 2005 
Mary, Martha and Lazarus, Companions of Our Lord

O Lord, open our lips.
And our mouth shall proclaim your praise.

Blessed are you, provident Father,
with the prayer your Son taught us always on our lips,
we ask, we seek, we knock at your door.
For these and all your mercies, we praise you:
Father, Son, and Holy Spirit:
Blessed be God for ever.

An opening canticle may be sung. 

http://www.oremus.org/ocan.html

Psalm 123

To you I lift up my eyes,*
 to you enthroned in the heavens.
As the eyes of servants look to the hand of their masters,*
 and the eyes of a maid to the hand of her mistress,
So our eyes look to the Lord our God,*
 until he show us his mercy.
Have mercy upon us, O Lord, have mercy,*
 for we have had more than enough of contempt,
Too much of the scorn of the indolent rich,*
 and of the derision of the proud.

Psalm 130

Out of the depths have I called to you, O Lord;
   Lord, hear my voice;*
 let your ears consider well the voice of my supplication.
If you, Lord, were to note what is done amiss,*
 O Lord, who could stand?
For there is forgiveness with you;*
 therefore you shall be feared.
I wait for the Lord; my soul waits for him;*
 in his word is my hope.
My soul waits for the Lord,
   more than the night-watch for the morning,*
 more than the night-watch for the morning.
O Israel, wait for the Lord,*
 for with the Lord there is mercy;
With him there is plenteous redemption,*
 and he shall redeem Israel from all their sins.

A Song of Repentance (1 John 1:5-9)

This is the message we have heard from Christ
and proclaim to you:
that God is light,
in whom there is no darkness at all.

If we say that we have fellowship with God
while we walk in darkness,
we lie and do not do what is true.

But if we walk in the light
as God is in the light,
we have fellowship with one another.

And the blood of Jesus, the Son of God,
cleanses us from all our sins.

If we say that we have no sin,
we deceive ourselves
and the truth is not in us.

If we confess our sins,
the One who is faithful and just will forgive us
and cleanse us from all unrighteousness.

Psalm 147:1-12

Alleluia!
   How good it is to sing praises to our God!*
 how pleasant it is to honour him with praise!
The Lord rebuilds Jerusalem;*
 he gathers the exiles of Israel.
He heals the brokenhearted*
 and binds up their wounds.
He counts the number of the stars*
 and calls them all by their names.
Great is our Lord and mighty in power;*
 there is no limit to his wisdom.
The Lord lifts up the lowly,*
 but casts the wicked to the ground.
Sing to the Lord with thanksgiving;*
 make music to our God upon the harp.
He covers the heavens with clouds*
 and prepares rain for the earth;
He makes grass to grow upon the mountains*
 and green plants to serve us all.
He provides food for flocks and herds*
 and for the young ravens when they cry.
He is not impressed by the might of a horse,*
 he has no pleasure in human strength;
But the Lord has pleasure in those who fear him,*
 in those who await his gracious favour.
 Alleluia!

READING [Ecclesiastes 3:9-15]:

What gain have the workers from their toil? I have seen
the business that God has given to everyone to be busy
with. He has made everything suitable for its time;
moreover, he has put a sense of past and future into
their minds, yet they cannot find out what God has done
from the beginning to the end. I know that there is
nothing better for them than to be happy and enjoy
themselves as long as they live; moreover, it is God's
gift that all should eat and drink and take pleasure in
all their toil. I know that whatever God does endures for
ever; nothing can be added to it, nor anything taken from
it; God has done this, so that all should stand in awe
before him. That which is, already has been; that which
is to be, already is; and God seeks out what has gone by.

For another Biblical reading,
1 Timothy 6:17-21

HYMN 
Words: Hardwicke Drummond Rawnsley (1850-1920)
Tune: Song 18
http://www.oremus.org/hymnal/l/l350.html
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Lord Jesus, who at Lazarus' tomb
to weeping friends from death's dark womb
didst bring new joy to life,
grant to the friends who stand forlorn
a vision of that larger morn
where peace has conquered strife.

May we behold across the bar
the dear immortals as they are,
empowered in act and will,
with purer eyes to see their King,
with fuller hearts his praise to sing,
with strength to help us still.

Not fettered now by fleshly bond,
but tireless in the great beyond,
and growing day by day.
Can we not make their gladness ours,
and share their thoughts, their added powers,
and follow as we pray?

O Holy Ghost, the strength and guide
of those who to this earth have died,
but live more near to God,
give us thy grace to follow on,
till we with them the crown have won
who duty's paths have trod.

The Benedictus (Morning), the 
Magnificat (Evening), or 
Nunc dimittis (Night) may follow.

Prayer:
Let us pray to God for the coming of the Kingdom:

O God, into the pain of the tortured:
breathe stillness.

Into the hunger of those deprived:
breathe fullness.

Into those who have died in you:
breathe life.

Into those who long for you:
breathe your presence.

Into your Church, especially the Diocese of
Polynesia, The Rt Revd Jabez Leslie Bryce, Bishop.
shed forth your renewing Spirit.

Your kingdom come, your will be done:
For the kingdom, the power and the glory
are yours, now and for ever. Amen.

Lord of mercy and redemption,
rescue us, we pray, from the depths of sin and death;
forgive us what we do wrong,
and give us grace to stand in your presence,
to serve you in Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

God our Father,
whose Son enjoyed the love of his friends
Mary, Martha and Lazarus,
in learning, argument and hospitality:
may we so rejoice in your love
that the world may come to know
the depths of your wisdom,
the wonder of your compassion,
and your power to bring life out of death;
through the merits of Jesus Christ, 
our friend and brother,
who is alive and reigns with you,
in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and for ever. Amen.
       
Gathering our prayers and praises into one,
let us pray as our Savior has taught us.

- The Lord's Prayer

Out of your never-failing abundance,
satisfy the hungers of body and soul
and lead all peoples of the earth
to the feast of the world to come. Amen.

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The psalms and the invitation to the Lord's Prayer are from _Celebrating
Common Prayer_ (Mowbray), (c) The Society of Saint Francis
1992, which is used with permission.

The canticle is from _Common Worship: Daily Prayer, Preliminary
Edition_, copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2002.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The opening prayer of thanksgiving and the closing prayer use sentences from 
prayers in _Opening Prayers: Collects in Contemporary Language_.
Canterbury Press, Norwich, 1999.

The intercession is adapted from a prayer in _In Spirit and In
Truth_, (c) World Council of Churches, 1991.
The second collect is from _Common Worship: Services and Prayers for
the Church of England_, material from which is included in this service is
copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2000.

Mary and Martha lived with their brother Lazarus at Bethany, a village not far
from Jerusalem. They are mentioned in several episodes in the Gospels.
On one occasion, when Jesus and His disciples were their guests (Luke
10:38-42), Mary sat at Jesus' feet and listened to Him while her sister Martha
busied herself with preparing food and waiting on the guests, and when Martha
complained, Jesus said that Mary had chosen the better part.
When Lazarus, the brother of Mary and Martha, had died, Jesus came to
Bethany. Martha, upon being told that He was approaching, went out to meet
Him, while Mary sat still in the house until He sent for her. It was to Martha
that Jesus said: "I am the Resurrection and the Life." (John 11:1-44)
Again, about a week before the crucifixion, as Jesus reclined at table, Mary
poured a flask of expensive perfume over Jesus' feet. Mary was criticized for
wasting what might have been sold to raise money for the poor, and again
Jesus spoke on her behalf. (John 12:1-8)
On the basis of these incidents, many Christian writers have seen Mary as
representing Contemplation (prayer and devotion), and Martha as representing
Action (good works, helping others); or love of God and love of neighbor
respectively.



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