OREMUS: 23 December 2005

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Thu Dec 22 17:00:01 GMT 2005


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OREMUS for Friday, December 23, 2005
O Emmanuel

O Lord, open our lips.
And our mouth shall proclaim your praise.

Blessed are you, Emmanuel
gentle Ruler and Giver of Laws,
the nations cry out for you
to rescue them from their exile.
You come and visit us in peace, O Lord,
and we rejoice with renewed hearts.
For these and all your mercies, we praise you:
Father, Son, and Holy Spirit,
Blessed be God for ever!

An opening canticle may be sung. 

http://www.oremus.org/advocant.html

Psalm 76

In Judah is God known;*
 his name is great in Israel.
At Salem is his tabernacle,*
 and his dwelling is in Zion.
There he broke the flashing arrows,*
 the shield, the sword and the weapons of battle.
How glorious you are!*
 more splendid than the everlasting mountains!
The strong of heart have been despoiled;
   they sink into sleep;*
 none of the warriors can lift a hand.
At your rebuke, O God of Jacob,*
 both horse and rider lie stunned.
What terror you inspire!*
 who can stand before you when you are angry?
>From heaven you pronounced judgement;*
 the earth was afraid and was still;
When God rose up to judgement*
 and to save all the oppressed of the earth.
Truly, wrathful Edom will give you thanks,*
 and the remnant of Hamath will keep your feasts.
Make a vow to the Lord your God and keep it;*
 let all around him bring gifts
   to him who is worthy to be feared.
He breaks the spirit of princes,*
 and strikes terror in the kings of the earth.

Psalm 120

When I was in trouble I called to the Lord,*
 I called to the Lord and he answered me.
Deliver me, O Lord, from lying lips*
 and from the deceitful tongue.
What shall be done to you and what more besides,*
 O you deceitful tongue?
The sharpened arrows of a warrior,*
 along with hot glowing coals.
How hateful it is that I must lodge in Meshech*
 and dwell among the tents of Kedar!
Too long have I had to live*
 among the enemies of peace.
I am on the side of peace,*
 but when I speak of it, they are for war.

A Song of the Covenant (Isaiah 42:5-8a)

Thus says God, who created the heavens,
who fashioned the earth and all that dwells in it;

Who gives breath to the people upon it,
and spirit to those who walk in it,

'I am the Lord and I have called you in righteousness,
I have taken you by the hand and kept you;

'I have given you as a covenant to the people,
a light to the nations, to open the eyes that are blind.

'To bring out the captives from the dungeon,
from the prison, those who sit in darkness.

'I am the Lord, that is my name;
my glory I give to no other.'

Psalm 148

Alleluia!
   Praise the Lord from the heavens;*
 praise him in the heights.
Praise him, all you angels of his;*
 praise him, all his host.
Praise him, sun and moon;*
 praise him, all you shining stars.
Praise him, heaven of heavens,*
 and you waters above the heavens.
Let them praise the name of the Lord;*
 for he commanded and they were created.
He made them stand fast for ever and ever;*
 he gave them a law which shall not pass away.
Praise the Lord from the earth,*
 you sea-monsters and all deeps;
Fire and hail, snow and fog,*
 tempestuous wind, doing his will;
Mountains and all hills,*
 fruit trees and all cedars;
Wild beasts and all cattle,*
 creeping things and winged birds;
Kings of the earth and all peoples,*
 princes and all rulers of the world;
Young men and maidens,*
 old and young together.
Let them praise the name of the Lord,*
 for his name only is exalted,
   his splendour is over earth and heaven.
He has raised up strength for his people
   and praise for all his loyal servants,*
 the children of Israel, a people who are near him.
   Alleluia!

Psalm 147:1-12

Alleluia!
   How good it is to sing praises to our God!*
 how pleasant it is to honour him with praise!
The Lord rebuilds Jerusalem;*
 he gathers the exiles of Israel.
He heals the brokenhearted*
 and binds up their wounds.
He counts the number of the stars*
 and calls them all by their names.
Great is our Lord and mighty in power;*
 there is no limit to his wisdom.
The Lord lifts up the lowly,*
 but casts the wicked to the ground.
Sing to the Lord with thanksgiving;*
 make music to our God upon the harp.
He covers the heavens with clouds*
 and prepares rain for the earth;
He makes grass to grow upon the mountains*
 and green plants to serve us all.
He provides food for flocks and herds*
 and for the young ravens when they cry.
He is not impressed by the might of a horse,*
 he has no pleasure in human strength;
But the Lord has pleasure in those who fear him,*
 in those who await his gracious favour.
 Alleluia!

READING [Isaiah 58:1-12]:

Shout out, do not hold back!
   Lift up your voice like a trumpet!
Announce to my people their rebellion,
   to the house of Jacob their sins.
Yet day after day they seek me
   and delight to know my ways,
as if they were a nation that practised righteousness
   and did not forsake the ordinance of their God;
they ask of me righteous judgements,
   they delight to draw near to God.
'Why do we fast, but you do not see?
   Why humble ourselves, but you do not notice?'
Look, you serve your own interest on your fast-day,
   and oppress all your workers.
Look, you fast only to quarrel and to fight
   and to strike with a wicked fist.
Such fasting as you do today
   will not make your voice heard on high.
Is such the fast that I choose,
   a day to humble oneself?
Is it to bow down the head like a bulrush,
   and to lie in sackcloth and ashes?
Will you call this a fast,
   a day acceptable to the Lord?

Is not this the fast that I choose:
   to loose the bonds of injustice,
   to undo the thongs of the yoke,
to let the oppressed go free,
   and to break every yoke?
Is it not to share your bread with the hungry,
   and bring the homeless poor into your house;
when you see the naked, to cover them,
   and not to hide yourself from your own kin?
Then your light shall break forth like the dawn,
   and your healing shall spring up quickly;
your vindicator shall go before you,
   the glory of the Lord shall be your rearguard.
Then you shall call, and the Lord will answer;
   you shall cry for help, and he will say, Here I am.

If you remove the yoke from among you,
   the pointing of the finger, the speaking of evil,
if you offer your food to the hungry
   and satisfy the needs of the afflicted,
then your light shall rise in the darkness
   and your gloom be like the noonday.
The Lord will guide you continually,
   and satisfy your needs in parched places,
   and make your bones strong;
and you shall be like a watered garden,
   like a spring of water,
   whose waters never fail.
Your ancient ruins shall be rebuilt;
   you shall raise up the foundations of many generations;
you shall be called the repairer of the breach,
   the restorer of streets to live in. 

For another Biblical reading,
Jeremiah 23:5-8

HYMN 
Words: Christopher Smart (1722-1771), alt.
Tune: Rustington
http://www.oremus.org/hymnal/w/w407.html
Hit "Back" in your browser to return to Oremus.

Where is this stupendous stranger?
Prophets, shepherds, kings, advise.
Lead me to my Master's manger,
show me where my Savior lies.
O Most Mighty! O Most Holy!
Far beyond the seraph's thought:
art thou then so weak and lowly
as unheeded prophets taught?

O the magnitude of meekness!
Worth from worth immortal sprung;
O the strength of infant weakness,
if eternal is so young!
God all-bounteous, all-creative,
whom no ills from good dissuade,
is incarnate, and a native
of the very world he made.

The Benedictus (Morning),
the 
Magnificat (Evening), or 
Nunc dimittis (Night) may
follow.

Prayer:
Merciful God, 
if we have spent so much time shopping
that we have had little time to spend
with those for whom we are shopping,
forgive us and give us sensitivity.

If we become so busy practicing for the Christmas programs
that we forget to think about what they mean,
forgive us and give us understanding.

If we decorate our houses
but neglect the inner beauty of our homes,
forgive us and grant us love.

If we are worried about how much Christmas is going to cost us,
but have given little thought to how much Christmas cost God,
forgive us and give us perspective.

If we are so consumed with thinking about Christmas
that we have little consideration
of the meaning of the first Christmas,
forgive us and give us insight.

We pray today especially for the Diocese of Zanzibar, Tanzania,
The Rt Revd Douglas Toto, Bishop.

Purify our conscience, Almighty God, by your daily visitation, 
that your Son Jesus Christ, at his coming, 
may find in us a mansion prepared for himself; 
who lives and reigns with you, in the unity of the Holy Spirit, 
one God, now and for ever. Amen. 

Awaiting his coming in glory,
let us pray as our Savior has taught us:

- The Lord's Prayer

Music may be found here

O come, O come, Emmanuel, 
and ransom captive Israel,
that mourns in lonely exile here
until the Son of God appear.
Rejoice! Rejoice! Emmanuel
shall come to thee, O Israel!

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The psalms are from _Celebrating Common Prayer_ (Mowbray),
(c) The Society of Saint Francis 1992, which is used with permission.

The canticle is from _Common Worship: Daily Prayer, Preliminary
Edition_, copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2002.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The opening prayer of thanksgiving is adapted by Stephen Benner and is based
on the antiphons O Emmanuel and Veni Domine.

The intercession is from _Chalice Worship_, (c) Chalice
Press, 1997. Reproduced with permission.

The collect is from The Book of Common Prayer According to the Use
of The Episcopal Church_.



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