OREMUS: 6 December 2004

Steve Benner steve.benner at oremus.org
Sun Dec 5 18:10:43 GMT 2004


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OREMUS for Monday, December 6, 2004
Nicholas, Bishop of Myra, c.326

O Lord, open our lips.
And our mouth shall proclaim your praise.

Blessed are you, God of mercy and might,
with tender comfort and transforming power
you come into our midst.
You remember your ancient promise
and make straight the paths that lead to you
and smooth out the rough ways,
that in our day
we might bring forth your compassion
for all humanity.
For these and all your mercies, we praise you:
Father, Son, and Holy Spirit,
Blessed be God for ever!

An opening canticle may be sung. 

http://www.oremus.org/advocant.html

Psalm 144

Blessed be the Lord my rock!*
 who trains my hands to fight and my fingers to battle;
My help and my fortress,
   my stronghold and my deliverer,*
 my shield in whom I trust,
   who subdues the peoples under me.
O Lord, what are we that you should care for us?*
 mere mortals that you should think of us?
We are like a puff of wind;*
 our days are like a passing shadow.
Bow your heavens, O Lord, and come down;*
 touch the mountains and they shall smoke.
Hurl the lightning and scatter them;*
 shoot out your arrows and rout them.
Stretch out your hand from on high;*
 rescue me and deliver me from the great waters,
   from the hand of foreign peoples,
Whose mouths speak deceitfully*
 and whose right hand is raised in falsehood.
O God, I will sing to you a new song;*
 I will play to you on a ten-stringed lyre.
You give victory to kings*
 and have rescued David your servant.
Rescue me from the hurtful sword*
 and deliver me from the hand of foreign peoples,
Whose mouths speak deceitfully*
 and whose right hand is raised in falsehood.
May our sons be like plants
   well nurtured from their youth,*
 and our daughters like sculptured corners of a palace.
May our barns be filled to overflowing*
 with all manner of crops;
May the flocks in our pastures
   increase by thousands and tens of thousands;*
 may our cattle be fat and sleek.
May there be no breaching of the walls,
   no going into exile,*
 no wailing in the public squares.
Happy are the people of whom this is so!*
 happy are the people whose God is the Lord!

A Song of the Justified (Romans 4.24,25; 5.1-5,8,9,11)

God reckons as righteous those who believe,
who believe in him who raised Jesus from the dead;

For Christ was handed over to death for our sins,
and raised to life for our justification.

Since we are justified by faith,
we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ.

Through Christ we have gained access
to the grace in which we stand,
and rejoice in our hope of the glory of God.

We even exult in our sufferings,
for suffering produces endurance,

And endurance brings hope,
and our hope is not in vain,

Because God's love has been poured into our hearts,
through the Holy Spirit, given to us.

God proves his love for us:
while we were yet sinners Christ died for us.

Since we have been justified by his death,
how much more shall we be saved from God's wrath.

Therefore, we exult in God through our Lord Jesus Christ,
in whom we have now received our reconciliation.

Psalm 150

Alleluia!
   Praise God in his holy temple;*
 praise him in the firmament of his power.
Praise him for his mighty acts;*
 praise him for his excellent greatness.
Praise him with the blast of the ram's-horn;*
 praise him with lyre and harp.
Praise him with timbrel and dance;*
 praise him with strings and pipe.
Praise him with resounding cymbals;*
 praise him with loud-clanging cymbals.
Let everything that has breath*
 praise the Lord.
   Alleluia!

READING [Genesis 1:1-5,14-18]:

In the beginning when God created the heavens and the
earth, the earth was a formless void and darkness covered
the face of the deep, while a wind from God swept over
the face of the waters. Then God said, 'Let there be
light'; and there was light. And God saw that the light
was good; and God separated the light from the darkness.
God called the light Day, and the darkness he called
Night. And there was evening and there was morning, the
first day.
And God said, 'Let there be lights in the dome of the sky
to separate the day from the night; and let them be for
signs and for seasons and for days and years, and let
them be lights in the dome of the sky to give light upon
the earth.' And it was so. God made the two great
lights the greater light to rule the day and the lesser
light to rule the night and the stars. God set them in
the dome of the sky to give light upon the earth, to rule
over the day and over the night, and to separate the
light from the darkness. And God saw that it was good. 

For another Biblical reading,
Revelation 10:1-11

HYMN 
Words: William H Savile (1859-1925)
Tune: Saint Nicolas (LM)

Far-shining names from age to age
Enrich the Church's heritage,
The loyal liegemen of the Lord,
Who found in thee their great reward.

One name from that immortal throng
Inspires to-day our festal song:
In loving memory we hold
The bishop and the saint of old,

Who, far away in eastern land,
With gentle heart and open hand
Loved all things living, shared his store
With homeless men who sought his door.

Friend of the poor, no less was he
The guardian saint of those at sea;
O'er wave-swept rock and sheltered bay
God's churches bear his name to-day.

And his the skill, the tender art
That wins the trustful, child-like heart:
His dearest title to the end
'Saint Nicolas, the children's friend.'

To thee, O Lord, the praise be given
For this true citizen of heaven:
A star above the stormy sea
To lead the wanderer home to thee.

The Benedictus (Morning), the 
Magnificat (Evening), or 
Nunc dimittis (Night) may follow.

Prayer:
O God, you are filled with possibility and mystery.
You hold our anxieties and our hopes. 

Your faithful forget to praise you, consumed by self-centered busyness,
O God of stillness, come into our hearts.

Your beloved community is baffled and broken,
O God of healing, come into our churches.

We pray especially today for the Diocese of 
Kirinyaga, Kenya, The Rt Revd Daniel Munene Ngoru, Bishop.

Your people wander in the streets without a place to lay their head,
O God our resting place, come into our neighborhoods.

Your world is torn apart by war and conflict,
O God of Peace, come into our world.

Night and day, we wait and pray, for you, our Emmanuel. Amen.

O Lord, raise up, we pray, your power
and come among us,
and with great might succour us;
that whereas, through our sins and wickedness
we are grievously hindered
in running the race that is set before us,
your bountiful grace and mercy
may speedily help and deliver us;
through Jesus Christ our Lord,
to whom with you and the Holy Spirit,
be honour and glory, world without end.  Amen.

 Almighty Father, lover of souls,
who chose your servant Nicholas
      to be a bishop in the Church,
that he might give freely out of the treasures of your grace:
make us mindful of the needs of others
and, as we have received, so teach us also to give;
through Jesus Christ your Son our Lord,
who is alive and reigns with you,
in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and for ever. Amen.

Awaiting his coming in glory,
let us pray as our Savior has taught us:

- The Lord's Prayer

Give us grace so to imitate your Son
in the humility and purity of his first coming
that, when he comes again,
we may be ready to greet him
with joyful love and firm faith. Amen.

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The psalms are from _Celebrating Common Prayer_ (Mowbray),
(c) The Society of Saint Francis 1992, which is used with permission.

The canticle is from _Common Worship: Daily Prayer, Preliminary
Edition_, copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2002.

The biblical passage is from The New Revised Standard Version (Anglicized
Edition), copyright (c) 1989, 1995 by the Division of Christian Education
of  the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Used by
permission. All rights reserved.

The opening prayer of thanksgiving uses a sentence from a prayer reprinted
from _Revised Common Lectionary Prayers_, copyright (c)
2002 Consultation on Common Texts; and another sentence from
_Opening Prayers: Collects in Contemporary Language_,
Canterbury Press, Norwich, 1999.

The intercession is adapted from a prayer by Allison Hajdu-Paulen.

The collects are from _Common Worship: Services and Prayers for the
Church of England_, material from which is included in this service is
copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2000.

The closing prayer is adapted from a prayer from _Common Worship:
Services and Prayers for the Church of England_, material from which is
included in this service is copyright (c) The Archbishops' Council, 2000.

Nicholas was a native of the western part of what is now Asiatic Turkey. He
became Bishop of Myra in the fourth century, and there are many stories of his
love for God and for his neighbor.
The best-known story involves a man with three unmarried daughters, and not
enough money to provide them with suitable dowries. This meant that they
could not marry, and were likely to end up as prostitutes. Nicholas walked by
the man's house on three successive nights, and each time threw a bag of gold
in through a window (or, when the story came to be told in colder climates,
down the chimney). Thus, the daughters were saved from a life of shame, and
all got married and lived happily ever after. Because of this and similar stories,
Nicholas became a symbol of anonymous gift-giving. [James Kiefer, abridged]



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